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  1. #21
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    Basically yes, the professional saws can take more abuse. They can run all day, every day and can be rebuilt more so than the others. But that does not mean the homeowner or ranch saws can't satisfy a whole lot of people that use their saws on weekend type of thing.

  2. #22
    Elite Member s219's Avatar
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    Default Re: Husqy 435 Cutting "on a curve"

    The pro saws have better internal/external construction and metal casings/castings (on some of the homeowner saws, even the engine block is plastic!). As mentioned, that means they can run harder/longer and are much more re-buildable.

    If you do visit a Stihl dealer, compare the 261 to the 290 to see the difference a pro model Stihl can make (of course, it costs more too). The 261 will outcut the 290 despite being down 5cc, it uses less fuel, and is 2 pounds lighter. It's just got better technology all the way through. The metal construction and overall design is much better too.

    The MS-250 is an OK saw, but not remarkable. It has poor efficiency/emissions specs, and is larger and heavier than it needs to be. In that size range, I honestly think Echo makes a better saw. The 250 and 290 are Stihl's best selling saws, mainly because of price.

  3. #23
    Veteran Member Treemonkey1000's Avatar
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    Default Re: Husqy 435 Cutting "on a curve"

    1st Peter 1:6-9

  4. #24
    Super Star Member LD1's Avatar
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    Default Re: Husqy 435 Cutting "on a curve"

    Boy did we go off topic Going from a saw cutting crooked that simply needs a chain......to new saw fever

    I like the way you think.

    Heres my on what is being discussed.

    Pro saws, are indeed a lot more money, but as others mentioned, more durable, faster, and lighter. You get what you pay for.

    That said, Looking at all saws in the MS250-MS290 range here, I dont think their is enough difference in size and performance to justify two saws in that range. That just my opinion though. If you want a second saw of SIMILAR size just for a back-up, thats fine, but what would you get???? The 270 is heavy like the 290 but slower. The 250 is lighter but also even slower yet. And if you got the 260, you might as well sell the 290 cause you'll never use it again.

    Also, have you considered other brands. In particular Dolmar. If you have a dealer, check out a 5105. It is REALLY similar to the 260 performance wise, but will cost less $$$.

    I guess my question to you would be this: You have the 290 and seem to like it. But want a second saw. Do you want that second saw to be similar in size? Smaller for trimming, or bigger than the 290 for bucking?
    ".........there is only one way to find out."
    "Ok, hold my beer and watch this.........."


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  5. #25
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    Default Re: Husqy 435 Cutting "on a curve"

    Quote Originally Posted by LD1 View Post
    Boy did we go off topic Going from a saw cutting crooked that simply needs a chain......to new saw fever

    I like the way you think.

    Heres my on what is being discussed.

    Pro saws, are indeed a lot more money, but as others mentioned, more durable, faster, and lighter. You get what you pay for.

    That said, Looking at all saws in the MS250-MS290 range here, I dont think their is enough difference in size and performance to justify two saws in that range. That just my opinion though. If you want a second saw of SIMILAR size just for a back-up, thats fine, but what would you get???? The 270 is heavy like the 290 but slower. The 250 is lighter but also even slower yet. And if you got the 260, you might as well sell the 290 cause you'll never use it again.

    Also, have you considered other brands. In particular Dolmar. If you have a dealer, check out a 5105. It is REALLY similar to the 260 performance wise, but will cost less $$$.

    I guess my question to you would be this: You have the 290 and seem to like it. But want a second saw. Do you want that second saw to be similar in size? Smaller for trimming, or bigger than the 290 for bucking?
    I want a second saw that would primarily be used when I need to either cut a lot of small stuff (like branches that are being cut down to stove / firepit size) or limbing a downed tree. When the heavier cutting is at hand (like cutting 14"-16" diameter and up stuff), I would use the 290.

    A 250 is lighter and slower than the 290, but has "enough" power that I could use it as a backup if the 290 conked out on my while trying to carve up the bigger stuff. Yes, it would take longer and go slower, but I wouldn't have to shut down the rest of the cutting for the day to get the 290 up and running again.

    For that reason, I could seemingly equip the 250 with a 16" bar and chain so that it's running at peak for the smaller work. In the event that the 290 quits and I have to go to the 250 as a backup, I could swap on the bar / chain from the 290 and go to it. Or, if the work is not above about 14" in diameter, I could leave the 16" bar and cut away. This is one of the attractive features of the 250 - it uses the same bar/chain setup as the 290.

  6. #26
    Elite Member s219's Avatar
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    Default Re: Husqy 435 Cutting "on a curve"

    Quote Originally Posted by meburdick View Post
    This is one of the attractive features of the 250 - it uses the same bar/chain setup as the 290.
    Just be careful -- that's no guarantee that the 250 can provide enough oil to keep longer bars lubricated. That's of key importance with modern Stihls, as they are quite stingy with oil now (for environmental reasons). I've run a 250 with an 18" bar and I think the oiling is marginal. The saw is generally sold with a 16" bar.

    If you do go with a 250, make sure it has the right chain/sprocket setup to really be interchangeable with the 290. I know the 290 has alternately been available with 0.325 or 3/8 pitch, 0.063 and 0.050 gauge, respectively. The 250 can come 0.325/0.063 or 3/8-Picco/0.050. Most dealers will let you pick, but I have seen some that only want to stock them one way. Sometimes they will cut a deal on extra bars and chains.

    The best chain selections are in 3/8 pitch and 0.063 gauge, which is what I will probably move my 261 to at some point. I'd like to buy a full-skip chain, but there are none available in 0.325.

  7. #27
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    Default Re: Husqy 435 Cutting "on a curve"

    Quote Originally Posted by s219 View Post
    Just be careful -- that's no guarantee that the 250 can provide enough oil to keep longer bars lubricated. That's of key importance with modern Stihls, as they are quite stingy with oil now (for environmental reasons). I've run a 250 with an 18" bar and I think the oiling is marginal. The saw is generally sold with a 16" bar.

    If you do go with a 250, make sure it has the right chain/sprocket setup to really be interchangeable with the 290. I know the 290 has alternately been available with 0.325 or 3/8 pitch, 0.063 and 0.050 gauge, respectively. The 250 can come 0.325/0.063 or 3/8-Picco/0.050. Most dealers will let you pick, but I have seen some that only want to stock them one way. Sometimes they will cut a deal on extra bars and chains.

    The best chain selections are in 3/8 pitch and 0.063 gauge, which is what I will probably move my 261 to at some point. I'd like to buy a full-skip chain, but there are none available in 0.325.
    18" chain is standard on that saw, my 290 is .325 and the 250 will be too.

  8. #28
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    I looked at a MS250 today and think for the price and size it would be a good weekend saw for many users.

    Of course I looked at the MS261 destined to retire my 026 and back up my MS441. That 261 is sure a nice saw and being good enough to retire a 026 is not an easy task.

  9. #29
    Elite Member s219's Avatar
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    Default Re: Husqy 435 Cutting "on a curve"

    Quote Originally Posted by meburdick View Post
    18" chain is standard on that saw, my 290 is .325 and the 250 will be too.
    Stihl *used* to spec the 250 with an 18" bar off-the-shelf, but for the 2012 model year it's now officially 16" (see page 32 of the new catalog). You can still buy whatever bar you want of course, but I'd stick to 16" as it's marginal oiling an 18" bar in my experience. Just not enough oil for long cuts in hardwood.

  10. #30
    Veteran Member Treemonkey1000's Avatar
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    Default Re: Husqy 435 Cutting "on a curve"

    s19 isn't the oiler adustable on that 250? 16" is my limbing saws up in the tree typically or for doing ground work when I don't want to pack a heavy saw around all day.
    1st Peter 1:6-9

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