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  1. #11
    Veteran Member Marveltone's Avatar
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    Jun 2010
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    Somewhere north of Roseau, MN
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    Fordson Major Diesel, McCormick Deering W4, Ford 1510, John Deere L111

    Default Re: are automatic chain sharpeners too hard on a chain?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fossil Farm View Post
    Have an attachment from Oregon that fits on the bar. Set the 2 angles based on the chain type and manually sharpen each tooth with the proper size file. With the attachment, the angles don't vary as it does just free-handing the sharpening. Takes maybe a minute to setup on the bar and does a real nice job. Gives you a chance to inspect each tooth too to see if there are any chips or problems that need corrected. Seems like most people wait too long to sharpen a chain. Needs sharpened way before you think it does to keep a good saw going. Should only take a few strokes on each tooth most of the time.
    I know the attachment you're talking about. I have the same one. Works very slick! Takes a little longer than grinding, but with the fine control you have with a file, I think the chains last longer.

    Joe
    Joe

    Fordson Major Diesel: Case 3-bottom Trip Plow, Case 12' Trip Field Cultivator, Kewanee 130 Disc, John Deere 1209 Mower Conditioner, John Deere 594LW Side Delivery Rake, New Holland Hayliner 273 Baler, 18' Spike-Tooth Harrow
    Ford 1510: Du-Al 105 Loader, "The Thumb" Grapple, Bush Hog RBC60 Rear Blade, Woods HC54 Rotary Cutter, Tarter 5' Heavy-Duty Hinge Back Box Blade, Buhler Farm King Y600 Snowblower

  2. #12
    Gold Member ncnurseryman's Avatar
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    Jan 2012
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    In the Piedmont, NC
    Tractor
    John Deere 970

    Default

    I've used the dremel sharpening attachment and its easy to use but the chain seems to get dull again very quickly. But, it could just be me, I tend to be hard on the saw.

  3. #13
    Member
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    May 2012
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    47
    Location
    Stanwood, WA
    Tractor
    New Holland T1510

    Default Re: are automatic chain sharpeners too hard on a chain?

    I have used one of the "automatic" chain grinders and found it to be expensive (20 bucks around here) but quite effective. Produced a wicked sharp chain and the salesguy kept talking up the "special" geometry it was putting on the chain. The chain cut fantastic until I put it in the dirt by accident. This cost me the equivalent of 5 sharpenings on the fancy machine, Northern Industrial Bench- or Wall-Mount Chain Grinder | Chain Saw Sharpeners, Maintenance Repair| Northern Tool + Equipment and have been thrilled with the results. Plus I do it on my own schedule and its available whenever brain fade winds me up with a dull chain.

    Chris.

  4. #14
    Elite Member
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    May 2012
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    2,972
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    Knoxville, TN
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    Bobcat CT225

    Default Re: are automatic chain sharpeners too hard on a chain?

    I used to have one of the Granberg jigs. I thought I would like its repeatability and control, but it was more of a pain in the butt than it was worth. With a bit of practice, I can do a fine job just filing by hand, and it is much faster. Frankly, I am not sure that the file angle is that critical. A few passes with the file, lined up with the angle on the front of the tooth, and away I go. It is possible that I would get some nth degree more sharpness if I used a jig instead of freehand, but I doubt I would notice in practice.

  5. #15
    Gold Member
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    Mar 2012
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    NSW Australia
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    Tractors16-600hp Farm & Earthmoving Equip, Trucks etc.

    Default Re: are automatic chain sharpeners too hard on a chain?

    My preference is always to use a hand file where practical, if required we may use a Dremel to reset any major angle adjustments (the Dremel Chain saw sharpener works fine but use at very low RPM, although the instructions are wrong as you need to sharpen from only one side the offset chain teeth) then finish with a hand file sharpen.

    I don't like grinders as they may remove too much metal & heat the chain teeth excessively if used at high RPM in the hands of an inexperienced operator (which is more the case than not, even in a shop they usually put the least skilled labour on the task) - And the chain is never as sharp as the edge you achieve with a quality hand file, a hand file is always a better option to produce a sharper edge & easier on the chain making it last.

    There are various types of hand file sharpening jig/guides available from a simple roller jig to something with far greater accuracy for the inexperinced/unskilled like the Timberline..all will achieve the same excellent result, just takes at little patience & perseverance to master......use only 1 way fiing strokes from the "inside" to the outside of tooth edge......I prefer not to use a jig as I manually adjust the angles according the characteristics of the timber.

    Whatever option you choose only sharpen a chain when it's cool/cold & better to sharpen more frequently than wait to the chain is near blunt (2 maybe 3 passes of hand file is all that should be required on each tooth & every c.3rd chain sharpen reset the depth gauges) & if you're planning all day cutting carry multiple sharp chains & swap to newly sharpened chains frequently ( we carry 4-5 chains for a days heavy dead hardwood cutting/fencing & then sharpen by hand the 4-5 chains in "bulk", makes a welcome break from cutting)

    We own/operate many saws on our farms, & with 35yr+ professional rural chainsaw use & logging experience .....a sharp chain & a patient safe operator who plans their cuts (& path of retreat) will make up for most limitations when using a chainsaw (including those of environment/saw brands/models/size).

  6. #16
    Platinum Member caver's Avatar
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    Sikeston, MO
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    Fisher Price, toddlers first tractor.

    Default Re: are automatic chain sharpeners too hard on a chain?

    I bought this one from Timber Tuff
    It looks like the same knockoff many sell. It was on sale for maybe $100 at the local Orscheln store. Now if I hit a rock, which is common in the Ozarks, not a big deal. I've taken some might as well throw away chains and brought them back to life.
    Claude farmer

  7. #17
    Silver Member
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    Mar 2012
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    128
    Location
    Sydney , Australia
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    Cub Cadet Gt2550

    Default Re: are automatic chain sharpeners too hard on a chain?

    Bought an electric chainsaw sharpener do it all myself , take my time doing it and get a very sharp set of cutters.
    The two angles needed to sharpen a chain , one is set the other adjustable , the biggest mistake I see is people grinding to much of the length of the tooth and trying to get it right in one go.
    The grinding disc should just brush/rub the front of the tooth and you should have 2 goes so that you do not put to much heat into the tooth (wrecks the hardness)
    I cut real hardwood Eucalyptus etc and have very few problems
    My Wife said I do not listen
    At least I think thats what she said

  8. #18
    Platinum Member JD 4520's Avatar
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    Apr 2011
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    Brinnon, WA
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    John Deere 4520

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by daugen
    There was some dirt on the back of a log I didn't see and my nice wood chips started mixing in with sawdust, so i knew I had dulled the chain. I've never sharpened a chain, and actually know people who just buy new ones when the chain gets dull. That sure seems wasteful to me, but I don't have the confidence in getting it right myself. So if, like Bird has asked, there's a good sharpener out there that won't eat up half the cutting edge, i'd be interested too.
    I hand sharpen mine 95% of the time and probably once in a chains life I will take it in to one of the machines and have it cleaned up. I am told a lot my chains are the sharpest. It's real easy once you get the hang of it to hand sharpen. It may take a swipe or two on each blade to keep them sharp. Key is to have the right file and guide, know the fill of the chain and sharpen often with limited sharpening. Big chips and fills like cutting butter - that's the goal.
    Gary

    JD 4520, 400X FEL, Frontier Front Blade, Box Blade, Rotary Cutter, Landscape Rake, 48" Wildkat Grapple and PHD

  9. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
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    Location
    Deer Island, Oregon/ Appleton, Washington
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    kubota L3400,Stilh Saws 045-ms250-ms390, Echo weedeaters,Ford Truck,CJ-5 fordv8,Super Glide bike.

    Default Re: are automatic chain sharpeners too hard on a chain?

    I bought a good bench grinder for my chain links.My saws are all stilh's.I do all my own and only take off what is needed to sharpen link.I cut about 10 cord a year so my saws do get a work out. A sharp saw is a safe saw.It is not that hard to take a saw chain off a saw. After all if you are giving you saw respect you should loosen the chain when done to take pressure off bearing on cutting side. Ford or Chevy. What ever works for you.I get a better angle with a bench grinder.

  10. #20
    Elite Member
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    Feb 2012
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    Washington NC (Inner Banks)
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    Kubota L5740, Gravely 8199G

    Default Re: are automatic chain sharpeners too hard on a chain?

    one of the things I enjoy greatly is to take my manual diamond file and sharpen all the kitchen knives. Definitely gets them sharper than the little six dollar pull through gadget, which works amazingly well by itself for the price.
    After reading all this good info, and thanks greatly guys, I think I'll try the manual method with a guide first. Probably just for touching up, as if I hit a nail or stone, I'm likely to let the dealer grind it back to shape. I like a sharp chain, I'm sure like all of you, and when the big chunky chips start getting smaller and smaller, it's time to change the chain and get out the spare. I'm doing a lot of woodcutting as a retirement way to get some exercise, nothing really huge, and my Echo 450 works real nicely. Probably the topic for another thread, but the new Oregon "self sharpening" setup looks pretty interesting, but I wonder if it does a consistent fair job and not a good job. It must sharpen the outside edge and not the inside, which means doing things very differently. I'll stick with the file for now and try to get some skills with that. There's a lot of good info also in the "similar threads" at the bottom of the page, my head is swirling with all the different options. Here's the pile I'm attacking now, slow and steady, a few hours each day, and I come home sweaty and happy, though my wife never likes getting the woods chips out of my socks...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -p1010745-2-jpg  

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