Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23
  1. #1
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    353
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Tractor
    JD 4210 E-Hydro

    Default Chainsaw Chain 101

    I'm attaching a picture of my chainsaw chain. Would you folks give me a Chainsaw Chain 101 Class ?? I've read threads on here about different style chains & different angles. I cut about a 50/50 mix of hardwood & softwood & sizes from 1" to 12". I also was told by someone about cutting the stub on the leading edge so the chain takes a better bite. I'd appreciate any tips on the chain/bar & even any saw tips. My saw is a Partner Pioneer 5000 about 15 years old but very little hours.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    353
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Tractor
    JD 4210 E-Hydro

    Default Re: Chainsaw Chain 101

    Another picture of the Chain. When I file the chain with my 5/32" round file, all I do is follow the existing angle. Any tips as to how to file the chain "properly".
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #3
    Platinum Member GregJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    703
    Location
    Washington
    Tractor
    Kubota B7500/LA302FEL/4672BH ; John Deere LX277

    Default Re: Chainsaw Chain 101

    Goodguy,
    The best thing I did for my chain saw was buy the Dremel tool chainsaw sharpening attachment. I can sharpen a chain in about 5 minutes. My personal experience has been that "sharp" is way more important than "angle". The Dremel tool makes it so easy that I sharpen more often and it does a much better job than hand filing. The chain I'm using right now, I used to cut roots that were covered with dirt. I figured I'd be throwing this chain away, but I keep touching it up and it cuts great. As I remember, the attachment was only around $20. Of course, you have to have a Dremel tool too, and they're around $70.

    Greg

  4. #4
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    305

    Default Re: Chainsaw Chain 101

    good guy, they make a filling guide, that's simply a U shaped peice of steel, about 6-8" long. it sits over the chain and shows you the angle to file at, and it also has relifs that show you how much your rakers are worn.( the little bump infront of the tooth)

    you don't want to file the rakers too much, or the saw will tend to grab things on you, and kick. i think the gage shows 0.035" below the tooth hight. other then that, your chain looks good. the very tip of the tooth is what gets dull, and you can usually see it.
    it is better to file a saw evey couple hours, with 1 or 2 rubs, then wait 8-10 hours and have to file it alot to get it sharp.

    those dremel sharpeners are nice, but i find it only takes 4-5 min's to file and service a saw anyway, course i used to work in the woods at one time.

    that old 5000 is a great saw, we've got 2 of them, and they have been the toughest saws we've ever had. thier comfortable to operate too. mind ya, i like my 257 huskey a little better, but if i hadn't cut wood for a living, i wouldn't have bought it.

  5. #5
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    1,162
    Location
    Lecompton, Kansas
    Tractor
    AgKing 2840 shuttle shift

    Default Re: Chainsaw Chain 101

    One thing to watch for is the gap in the bar where the chain runs. Keep the narrow side down on the saw (it makes it cut straighter) Also when you tighten the chain, keep the chain and bar in the upper most position as you tighten the bar clamp bolts. To sharpen with a file, I have a vise mounted on a wood bench (3" or 4") and I clamp the bar in the middle of the bar (so not to bend the chain guide shut). You can buy a file handle from Walmart that shows the correct angle and the cutter wraps around the holder. The handle is around $5. I always used 3 passes on each cutter with the file, no more or less. This method worked pretty well for me and my chains lasted the longest too.

    Bill

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    151
    Location
    Northwest Georgia
    Tractor
    Kubota GL 3430 - Massey TL30 - Ford 1700

    Default Re: Chainsaw Chain 101

    Here is some pretty good reading about saw chains

    Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Saw Chain, but Didnít Know Who to Ask

    GareyD

  7. #7
    Super Member Henro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    5,364
    Location
    Few miles north of Pgh, PA
    Tractor
    Kubota B2910, BX2200, Yardman 20HP pos...

    Default Re: Chainsaw Chain 101

    Great link, GareyD!

    Especially for guys like me who know very little about chainsaw chains... [img]/forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif[/img]

  8. #8
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Posts
    112

    Default Re: Chainsaw Chain 101

    Using your round file follow the same angle and file each tooth the same number of times. If it is still fairly sharp try five full strokes for each tooth. If it is dull try 10 to 15 full strokes. Then move to the rackers in front of the teeth. Use a flat file and file the top of each racker down the same amount. Try 5 full strokes and see if this lets the teeth bite into the wood. You have to file the rackers down just enough to let the teeth actually cut into the wood other wise they hold the teeth just above the wood.
    I usually sharpen the saw by standing it straight up while setting it on its handle and resting the bar between my legs as I sit on a block of wood. I do every other tooth to keep the angle right on one side and then turn the saw 180 degrees and get the teeth on the other side. Helps to mark the point where you start.
    Once the saw is sharp you can keep it sharp by filing the chain this way about every second tank of gas or when the blade hits something hard like metal or dirt. Once you get used to it you can sharpen it in about five minutes and the saw will be much more productive, more than saving you the five minutes you invested.
    When the chain stretches to far of when you really tear up and deform the teeth it will be time to buy a new chain.

  9. #9
    Gold Member johndeere2210's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    347
    Location
    Nebraska
    Tractor
    John Deere 2210

    Default Re: Chainsaw Chain 101

    I keep three chains, one on the saw and two spares. I keep them sharp with this sharpener from HF. It came with simple instructions but works good.

    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=40208

    [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img] [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]

  10. #10
    Super Member SPIKER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    5,000
    Location
    Ohio, Jeromesville, Ashland County
    Tractor
    Jinma 284

    Default Re: Chainsaw Chain 101

    I agree with the other guys about using a file to sharpen the chain a bit. I use 3 strokes when touching up the chain, (once per tank or so) and then 10 or so every 3 or so tanks. I ran into a deal at HF and bought about 15 files one day at .25 cents each. so I grabbed a hand full. they so far are lasting better than my oragan one did from wallyworld.

    NOTE: only file one dirrection "PUSHING AWAY and INTO THE ANGLE" do not drag the file back and forth as that will not put an EDGE on the tooth. the cutting edge/angle should be filed so that when you PUSH the file into the chain the leading edge of the file hits the upright /vertical part and leaves the flat top of the tooth. I usually never worry about the rakers as they will ware faster than the tooth if you keep the teeth sharp... though over shapreming them means having to file the rakers too....

    other NOTE:

    DON'T PUSH DOWN very hard push BACK which actually LIFTS the chain/tooth a bit, this makes sure the file stays in contact with the flat top of the tooth and keeps you from fileing down into the tooth root area which will keep the top flat chissel of the tooth from getting a good sharp edge which is as if not more important than the vertical cutting board part...
    also NOTE: if using a dremel be sure the rotation is correct for the chain just like the file the rotation should rotate over the top of the tooth flat. if it spins the other way it will leave a edge which will not stay sharp and can over heat when sharpening it too. (think of sharpening a knife the edge should be basacally cutting at an angle into the stone...)



    Mark M

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2016 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.