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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    52
    Tractor
    Jinma 284

    Default Locking the differential.

    Hi everyone, I have been reading these pages for over 3 months and I wanted to say thank you for all of the good information that I have found here. It was in great part because of this web site that I decided to give Jinma a try and I purchased a 284 with a loader, tiller and box-blade. The tractor has exceeded every expectation I had when I purchased it. I was expecting the poor fit and finish that I had read about, And I was very pleasantly surprised to see that this is not the case with my tractor. Even Walt my neighbor who owns a new 22HP JD was impressed when he came over to look at it.


    My question is really a simple one and a little embarrassing to ask but here it goes. As I was working with the tractor I wanted to lock my differential to get through a slick area, I pushed the locking lever by the seat forward and it went down, pushing the pin into the rear transmission housing. However the lever would not stay down on its own. I needed to hold it down to keep it locked. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif[/img] Latter I looked closely at this lever and it does not seem to have any mechanism to hold it in the locked position. Am I missing something? Now I am wondering if this was done to keep people from accidentally leaving the differential locked.


    Thanks . [img]/forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif[/img]

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Locking the differential.

    My Farm pro 25hp is the same way. I think it is, like you said, to prevent it from being left engaged and destroying something. I don't know about yours, but mine was metal against metal where the lever actually pushes the pin (ball)into the differential. I put a gob of heavy grease on it and now the handle is much smoother. Before it was actually cutting a groove in the metal.

  3. #3
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    39,196
    Location
    Texas

    Default Re: Locking the differential.

    I don't know anything about your tractor, but I'll bet it's working as it's supposed to. The differential lock on each of my Kubotas was a pedal you held down with your left heel and they released when you removed your foot.

  4. #4
    Super Member greg_g's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    6,086
    Location
    Western Kentucky
    Tractor
    JD3720 Cab, 300X loader with 4-in-1 bucket

    Default Re: Locking the differential.

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( I pushed the locking lever by the seat forward and it went down, pushing the pin into the rear transmission housing. However the lever would not stay down on its own. )</font>


    Assuming the non-drive wheel actually engaged by the lever, then your diff lock is working as designed. The return spring is internal, disengaging the locking fork when you back off on the throttle.

    Consider engaging your 4wd instead, especially before transiting such known "slick spots". I find that the front wheels will pull you through a lot of stuff that would ordinarily make 2wd owners grab for the diff lock handle/lever/pedal. My tractors spend about 99% of the time on grass and gravel. I seldom come out of 4wd except for the infrequent occasions when tires meet asphalt or concrete.

    //greg//

  5. #5
    Old Timer Soundguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    51,392
    Location
    Central florida
    Tractor
    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: Locking the differential.

    Ditto.. on my ex-Nh1920 the diffylock was a pedal under the right heal... hold down for lock.

    At the moment.. I can't remember what/where the pedal on my NH 7610s is [img]/forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif[/img] You'd think i would know that!!!???

    It's got so many darn levers and pedals.. it's hard to know what is what! [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

    Soundguy

  6. #6
    Elite Member SnowRidge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    3,091
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Tractor
    Power Trac PT-425 / Branson 3520

    Default Re: Locking the differential.

    One of my neighbors had his MF "borrowed" by a "friend." The "friend" got stuck somewhere and slammed the diff lock pedal down with the throttle wide open.

    The bill was $800.

  7. #7
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    110
    Location
    Central Massachusetts
    Tractor
    Jinma's and Guilin Dozers

    Default Re: Locking the differential.

    Don't worry, it's working as designed. The diif lock is for
    "temporary" application to get you through a slick or muddy
    spot. It pretty much disables your steering so it's designed
    to require a conscious effort to keep engaged. One safety
    tip as one of the posters notes, ALWAYS engage gentley
    at a low engine speed. You are coupling the non-drive wheel
    directly to the drive wheel with NO give. Do that fast
    and you can chip or shatter the spider gears or do other
    EXPENSIVE damage to the rear drive line...Slow and easy
    is the best way to stay out of trouble..

    Cheers
    Graham

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    52
    Tractor
    Jinma 284

    Default Re: Locking the differential.

    Thanks everyone, this confirms what I thought earlier. I have been around tractors all of my life but this is the fist tractor I have ever owned and I am learning all of the time. Thanks for the advice to engage the lock (if I ever need it) with low rpms. I am planning on dumping all of the factory fluids out of the tractor next and replacing them with new. I am sure this will bring up more questions.

    Cheers.
    [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

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