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  1. #11
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    906
    Location
    Armstrong, BC
    Tractor
    Kioti DK35 SE HST (2011)

    Default

    Perhaps it would be easiest just to fell the dozen or so larger trees with a chain saw and remove the stumps with the excavator.

  2. #12
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    3,748
    Location
    Stowe, Vermont
    Tractor
    Kubota L3240HST, KX-121-3S

    Default Re: Tree Clearing w/KX121-3

    While I second all the cautionary words, I think this is doable with the equipment and the timeframe you've mentioned. I harvest firewood with my B3030 and KX-121S. The largest trees are rock maple about 18" across. While too heavy for the mini-ex to pick up and move, I have been able to lift portions and use the chainsaw to cut off 8-12' sections which are then easily carried away. Or I slice them into stove length and use the RTV to haul them down to the splitter.

    The largest tree I harvested was a massive black cherry with a diameter at the base of 42". With that tree I sawed it into six foot sections and used the blade to roll it across the meadow; the girth was simply too large for my thumb to get a grip on it. If you have an angled blade you can make mid-course corrections as it rolls.

    Pete
    Kubota L3240HST, LA721 FEL, Farmi 531 winch, Woods 72" Brush Bull, LandPride RB2584 blade with hydraulic angle
    Kubota KX121-3S, angle blade w/ float, hydraulic thumb
    2012 BMW R1200GSA for solo adventures
    2010 BMW R1200GSA w/ sidecar for adventures with my dog - www.TravelsWithBarley.com

  3. #13
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    133
    Location
    Columbus, MS
    Tractor
    Gehl AL340

    Default Re: Tree Clearing w/KX121-3

    Cut the bigger trees and dig out the stumps if you don't feel comfortable pushing them over whole. I would suggest leaving the stumps taller than I did, however it still works.

    That's a "24 inch" bucket in the picture; I haven't measured its outside dimension. kubota 121-3.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -img_6153-jpg   -img_6156-jpg  
    Last edited by lumberjack1986; 02-18-2013 at 07:11 AM.

  4. #14
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    924
    Location
    Central NH (God's Country)
    Tractor
    Kubota 1982 B7200 , L-39(2005) Kubota RTV 900 (2005), Komatsu PC75UU2E(1997), Mahindra Max28XL Shuttle (2013)

    Default Re: Tree Clearing w/KX121-3

    Quote Originally Posted by tlbuser View Post
    I have to agree here. Things can, and do, go very wrong quickly. A simple move of the wrist in the wrong direction can make for a bad day. Pushing a pile of trees, things can roll over the top or side and come right into the operators station. Stuff you never expect can get brought up by the tracks and into the operators area (cable, vines, roots, etc.). Every day, I'm thankful for making it through safe. I posted this awhile back, but it's still fresh in our minds when we're working.
    http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/c...-accident.html
    Yuck, I missed that thread back in 2011. Very sad. Guess I have angels looking after me. A KX121 has no business clearing anything but small trees & brush. Yes it can slowly work at the roots of a large tree, but that tree can get revenge real fast.

  5. #15
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    133
    Location
    Columbus, MS
    Tractor
    Gehl AL340

    Default Re: Tree Clearing w/KX121-3

    There's no reason a 121 couldn't clear a large tree, provided it's fairly neutral in weight/lean and you can install a high line/rope to pull with another piece of suitable equipment to pull it into the lay.

    The 121 has no business pushing any "large" tree over by itself. Cut the tree then dig out the stump!

    This is a 30" stump, 20 minutes between the pictures, another 10 minutes to roll the stump out and fill the hole back in.
    -img_6236-jpg
    -img_6237-jpg


    This stump took a while longer, it's my biggest to date with a machine this small. Guessing it's near 40" if it was ALAPed. (Cut as low as practical).

    -img_6242-jpg

  6. #16
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    148
    Location
    Port Angeles, WA
    Tractor
    Kubota 3130HST w/LA723, HD bucket

    Default Re: Tree Clearing w/KX121-3

    Don't you hate it when folks don't follow up with results? I''ll rectify my guilty behavior.

    After going over many options and taking in opinions here and elsewhere, I decided to tackle it myself - mostly.

    First up - I did it with even a smaller excavator. The rental place I had in mind didn't have KX-121's, I was mistaken - all they had was a KX-91. Based on no universal opinion regarding the 121's capabilities, this caused me some concern.

    In chatting with my local excavator/dozer pro, he mentioned another outfit in town that rented Cat equipment. They don't advertise to the public very much - they primarily cater to contractors and the timber industry. Chatted with them, and ended up renting a 304E...still smaller than a 121, but I was assured it was up to the task in the right hands, and given enough time. I had the latter part covered...the former, not so much.

    The first two days were brutal...but then, it started to click. I noticed I was no longer thinking about what control did what, and was just starting to move the sticks without thinking too much about it. Another day was spent practicing being smooth, then a couple more days honing technique. After two weeks, the trees were down - but doing it again today, I could probably knock them out in under a week.

    As it turns out, the biggest problem wasn't knocking the trees down - it was moving and stacking them. The little Cat had no swing power, and the alder grove was thick - so there was a lot of dragging trees around to clear them from obstructions, instead of picking them up and simply swinging them to a stack. Also, another shortcoming that was quickly noticed - limited reach. Creating tall burn piles just ain't possible with these little guys, so I ended up with about 20 or so smaller piles instead of two or three.

    With the trees down, I had to call in the pro to grade for the pole barn - quite a bit of dirt needed to be moved about, and I took heed of the advice to bring in somebody who knew what they were doing. While he was here doing that, he took a couple hours to consolidate my 20 piles into two, and we got one lit off before the burn ban kicked in.

    While I definitely saved money doing it myself, my time is now free. Were I still working for a living, hiring it out would have been a no-brainer. And, I readily tell folks now that should the opportunity present itself, there are few things in life more enjoyable than running an excavator. The fun factor alone was worth it, and now that I've a little skill under my belt - renting it again for future chores will be far more productive.

    Pics show the final result. A little different, eh? Last remaining pile gets burned soon, pasture grass seed going down after the ashes are spread. Then, everything sits as-is until we can afford to build.

    Another update in a couple years.

    -cleared4-jpg-cleared3-jpg-cleared2-jpg-cleared1-jpg

  7. #17
    Veteran Member Bob Rooks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    2,278
    Location
    Bothell & Silverdale, WA
    Tractor
    Yuchai Bulldozer

    Default Re: Tree Clearing w/KX121-3

    That turned out very nice. Good job.
    Yuchai 306R dozer, Mustang 2040 skid steer, Mitsubishi MS035 Mini-Ex with four buckets and a rake, Trimble equipped 7' Dual Dozer with twin GCR-2 laser receivers, and a LiTW BH7600 back hoe (sold).

  8. #18
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    6,965
    Location
    SF Bay Area-Ca Olympia WA Salzburg Austria
    Tractor
    Cat D3, Deere 110 TLB, Kubota BX23 and L3800 Craftsman Mower, Deere 350C Dozer

    Default Re: Tree Clearing w/KX121-3

    Quote Originally Posted by DaNag View Post
    Don't you hate it when folks don't follow up with results? I''ll rectify my guilty behavior.

    After going over many options and taking in opinions here and elsewhere, I decided to tackle it myself - mostly.

    First up - I did it with even a smaller excavator. The rental place I had in mind didn't have KX-121's, I was mistaken - all they had was a KX-91. Based on no universal opinion regarding the 121's capabilities, this caused me some concern.

    In chatting with my local excavator/dozer pro, he mentioned another outfit in town that rented Cat equipment. They don't advertise to the public very much - they primarily cater to contractors and the timber industry. Chatted with them, and ended up renting a 304E...still smaller than a 121, but I was assured it was up to the task in the right hands, and given enough time. I had the latter part covered...the former, not so much.

    The first two days were brutal...but then, it started to click. I noticed I was no longer thinking about what control did what, and was just starting to move the sticks without thinking too much about it. Another day was spent practicing being smooth, then a couple more days honing technique. After two weeks, the trees were down - but doing it again today, I could probably knock them out in under a week.

    As it turns out, the biggest problem wasn't knocking the trees down - it was moving and stacking them. The little Cat had no swing power, and the alder grove was thick - so there was a lot of dragging trees around to clear them from obstructions, instead of picking them up and simply swinging them to a stack. Also, another shortcoming that was quickly noticed - limited reach. Creating tall burn piles just ain't possible with these little guys, so I ended up with about 20 or so smaller piles instead of two or three.

    With the trees down, I had to call in the pro to grade for the pole barn - quite a bit of dirt needed to be moved about, and I took heed of the advice to bring in somebody who knew what they were doing. While he was here doing that, he took a couple hours to consolidate my 20 piles into two, and we got one lit off before the burn ban kicked in.

    While I definitely saved money doing it myself, my time is now free. Were I still working for a living, hiring it out would have been a no-brainer. And, I readily tell folks now that should the opportunity present itself, there are few things in life more enjoyable than running an excavator. The fun factor alone was worth it, and now that I've a little skill under my belt - renting it again for future chores will be far more productive.

    Pics show the final result. A little different, eh? Last remaining pile gets burned soon, pasture grass seed going down after the ashes are spread. Then, everything sits as-is until we can afford to build.

    Another update in a couple years.

    -cleared4-jpg-cleared3-jpg-cleared2-jpg-cleared1-jpg
    Enjoyed following your updates...

    Must be a great feeling of satisfaction know all that you have acomplished!

    Don't wait so long to post next time!

    When do you find time for the C-Dory boat?

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