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  1. #1
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    50
    Location
    Alberta
    Tractor
    Kubota b2400

    Default converting my Kubota B2400 into a logging tractor

    OK. Sitting up sick with what is either a nasty cold, or the flu. I'm up, I'm bored, so the time has come to write up the "transformation" of my little kubota B2400 into a small woodlot logging machine. This has happened over the course of a few years now, with me humming and hawing as to what I wanted.

    The first modification was to transform the loader to a bobcat quick attach style loader. Although I didn't have a need at that time, things were very slow at work, and I was about to be laid off. In order to have me handy in the event I was needed, the boss let me bring in the tractor and use his equipment. This was great because I am NOT a welder, and I was able to get advice when needed. Unfortunately, I did not take pictures along the way. To start, I cut the pads off the bucket. This was done with a grinder. In retrospect, much as I loath the process, carbon arc would have been much faster and cleaner. With the pads off the bucket but still attached to the loader, I began the fabrication (please note - if you are doing any welding onto any vehicle, disconnect the battery and place your grounds in the most appropriate place you can).






    Modifications I will be doing later to the project is entirely with the locking system. I will be putting bends in the handle, and making the "connecting rod" much stronger. All pivot points are shoulder bolts. Dimensions came from drawings linked to a forum I frequent, and a bobcat blank plate. It was very handy to have the blank available. If anybody else is looking to do this modification, I'd recommend purchasing a blank plate from a place like Northern Tools or TSC to use. You will come up with a project for the plate at some point anyway. Being almost unemployed, I used scrap pieces of 1/4" steel with the boss' permission to make the mounts onto the bucket. I was fortunate in being able to use the big press brake to put some bends into the mounts. This has worked well and held together for some fairly serious use for several years now (I was very worried about my welds). I hadn't painted it due to fears of failure, repairs or modifications, and I guess I probably should now at some time.

    The next item I got was actually a self releasing snatch block for changing direction of a load pull (made in the USA). I was researching this and was fortunate to stumble on a deal, so this part of the review is NOT totally impartial but extremely favourable. This will be reviewed in detail later (as in additional post).



    It was to be used with the little logging winch I got for my tractor, a Wallenstein FX65 (made in Canada). I was worried about my little tractor being too light, but it turns out not to have been a real concern. The tractor is easily able to handle the winch, although towing a full load up hill challenges it at times. I would probably not be able to get away with as much if I was out east in hardwood country. I suspect I would need/want another 20hp or so. A couple of small beefs with the winch are it will not work at all with my quick attach, so the quick attach had to be removed from the tractor. I also would have liked a place to store my chokers and saw during transportation. Otherwise this winch is slick.



    It works very well, and the "blade" really helps my light tractor from being dragged around. I know this safety message is repeated often, but again, be very careful about direction of pulls. The winch would easily upset the tractor.

    I don't live in logging country, so supplies for chokers were a little more echallenging. I wound up making my own. The jig for bending the "needle" was simply two bolts and two nuts welded together. Worked very well as a quick, cheap method. The "eyes" were closed using the vice. No welds needed.




    After using the tractor to clean up a mess of willow, I felt I needed a grapple to aid in cleanup, and to keep things generally tidy. I will also be using it to cut the logs into stove length later with greater safety. More digging, and on one of my favourite forums I found reference to an affordable grapple, the wildkat economy 48" grapple. I could buy this American made grapple for not much difference in price than the steel was going to cost me, so I bit the bullet and ordered it. Shipping was fairly reasonable using their suggested shipper, and I cleared customs myself. I ordered mine with the bobcat style attachment and without the quick connects for the hydraulics, as they would have been bobcat flat style instead of pioneer to make my life simple. The hose ends came a larger size than the hose, or my tractor, so a quick visit to a hydraulics shop, and I had new ends the correct size crimped on (originally 3/8" fittings on 1/4" hose). I added Pioneer quick attach (one male and one female, with the same on the hydraulic lines for this both to prevent accidental reversing, and because any attachments I add later can use one set instead of two male or female).






    Time to move onto the hydraulics for the tractor

    Since I was going to be adding a hydraulic circuit, and me not being a hydraulics guy, I had to do a lot of thinking to get my head wrapped around this. I also got a lot of advice from a fellow on a different, non-related forum. Since I had to take the valve off to make a new mount for the new solenoid valve, I figured I'd just open up the valve and replace the rings. I got an end cap off, looked at the mess, and put it back together. I used it until the replacement (Brand Hydraulics, made in USA) arrived. When I tried to mount this, I discovered I had goofed. I was either going to have to return it, or totally fabricate a new mount. I chose the latter due to time, and border/brokerage issues. It turns out there are 4 possible orientations for the valve, and I saw the picture and thought it was the correct orientation. I should have read further. Instead of the valve being flat as it was on my Kubota, the valve was oriented on it's side (this was determined by the movement of the joystick to keep the positioning the same). I also ordered the power beyond valve with the new loader valve.

    I was able to order a joystick handle from my local mens boutique/emporium, with a two way, normally open switch on it. From the same location I got a solenoid and base for the hydraulics. After assembling everything, I had a working tractor. After fixing some minor hydraulic leaks, that is...







    Action shots will be coming... I need to get them, and to do a writeup of the individual components.
    Last edited by Iron Brew; 04-20-2012 at 01:47 PM.

  2. #2
    Elite Member Ductape's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    4,855
    Location
    Central New Hampshire
    Tractor
    Kubota B3030HSDC

    Default Re: converting my Kubota B2400 into a logging tractor

    All great modifications. I think yours may be the smallest tractor I've seen with a SSQA, but I would have done the same. Nice work on the hydraulics too.

  3. #3
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    50
    Location
    Alberta
    Tractor
    Kubota b2400

    Default Re: converting my Kubota B2400 into a logging tractor

    LOL. Hydraulics weren't quite done the way I wanted... due to the valve orientation. Too many 90 degree bends. You takes what you can get though...

    Thanks

  4. #4
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    510
    Location
    nc PA.
    Tractor
    kubota b3200: kubota b7800: kubota rtv900

    Default Re: converting my Kubota B2400 into a logging tractor

    excellent set up and very good job with your modifications and builds! looks like you are ready to go. i too use a kubota b series tractor to do firewood for a business. (b7800, 30hp, tractor weight with fel/loaded tires=2600 lbs, fransgard 3ph winch=7000lbs pull capacity) do around 200 face cords a year. this year, with the weather being the way it has been here in the north east (u.s.), i was able to get a jump on it and will probably come in with around 300 face cords, if the weather stays nice. it is amazing how well these light tractors do handle the 3ph winches. alot of it has to do with the dozer blade anchoring the winch into the ground like you said. i was afraid the pulling force of the winch would rip the back of the tractor apart when i first got it, but no problems yet. i do skid with mine, depending on the circumstances, but mostly just get the logs to the logging roads and block up the fire wood there and haul it out in block form in my kubota rtv and trailer (keeps the fire wood cleaner=customers like and doesn't dull saw as much=i like, and doesn't tear up peoples logging roads as i cut on their property after they have it timbered and doesn't leave a mess on their landing as only good fire wood blocks are brought down and no unwanted/unuseable chunks). like you said, the weight of the b2400/b7800 can be too light at times to skid with. extra hp and weight would help, but with that also comes size and for me that would not always work better. i need to get sideways on logging roads cut out of steep hills, so there is not much room for a bigger tractor. i love working with my b7800.

    nice job with the front grapple as well. i have never used one, but i am sure would be handy. a lot of work went in to your project to set it up and make it look as nice and well built as you did. i wish you many good safe years with your set up. and i can't wait to see your action shots!

  5. #5
    Silver Member IntervaleFarms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    108
    Location
    Burtts Corner, New Brunswick Canada
    Tractor
    Case IH 485

    Default Re: converting my Kubota B2400 into a logging tractor

    Great looking setup!
    Case IH 485
    John Deere 430W
    Polaris Ranger 400

  6. #6
    Platinum Member archerynut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    671
    Location
    Near Pittsburgh, PA
    Tractor
    Looking again

    Default

    Great job. Nice looking mods.

  7. #7
    Gold Member davygp38's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    478
    Location
    where NY,NJ, and PA all meet
    Tractor
    Kubota L4400

    Default Re: converting my Kubota B2400 into a logging tractor

    Nice job. Seeing that winch on your tractor gets me to thinking.
    How do you like me now?

  8. #8
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    462

    Default Re: converting my Kubota B2400 into a logging tractor

    all I did was make a big grill guard and weld a chain hook anchor on the bucked to hand some tongs on.

  9. #9
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    50
    Location
    Alberta
    Tractor
    Kubota b2400

    Default Re: converting my Kubota B2400 into a logging tractor

    Way too many sticks for that... and the grapple has been awesome for dealing with slash/brush.

  10. #10
    Super Star Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    14,436
    Location
    Yanceyville, North Carolina
    Tractor
    Kubota L4400

    Default Re: converting my Kubota B2400 into a logging tractor

    Innovative.
    The PUPIL who does not surpass his Master, fails his Master.

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