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  1. #1
    Elite Member Richard's Avatar
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    Default Death & dealing with her son

    No condolences needed to me, as my emotional attachment here isn't as high as it could have been.

    My wifes father has had a girlfriend for say... 15 years now. Ever since his wife passed away. She moved in with him about 13 years ago (technically uninvited but I don't think he cared TOO much!!)

    Over the 13 years, she has looked out for him, cooked for him and so on. MANY of her belongings have osmosed to his house over the years. She has kept her house in working order, about an hour away.

    Last summer she developed clots in her lungs and that was the beginning of her downward spiral.

    Several months ago, Walt FINALLY told her he (in his mid 80's and tons of health issues) can't look after her (in her mid 70's and otherwise, in prior great health).

    She got antsy about that & moved back to HER house. She's been on oxygen since last summer.

    Over the weeks of her moving home, she asked him to bring her, her clothes & belongings. He did take her most of (if not all) her clothes, however, he simply can NOT take her a treadmill she had at his house.

    He mentioned the treadmill and perhaps other items to her son who lives in between the two houses.

    She didn't want to put her son out to come get these things and she suggested that possibly I be the one to deliver them to her (of course, I don't have any truck or trailer either, just like her son)

    Her son never did come out to get anything. He simply ignored the reality and "we" weren't going to go rent a truck or something to deliver said items to her.

    To be clear... there are no anamosities here, other than a large disdain to her son who has never lifted a finger to dig in and help out. He's much too busy (at 55 ?) to go to swim competitions in the AARP class so he can beat up on other guys who are 70 years old it seems.

    Ok... I know this is long winded but I think some of the history is needed.


    She passed last night. her treadmill is STILL at Walt's house. Her son(s) have NEVER made any comment, effort or the like, to retrieve it nor any other of her belongings.

    Now that she's gone, I think it's even LESS likely they'll put any effort into it.

    One of them (the local son) happens to be an attorney.

    The wife, sister in law & Walt have chatted about these things and how they are going to "tell" the son he needs to do such & such...

    Realizing he's shown ZERO interest & effort to date, to do ANYTHING our way to help his mother, I'm not so sure words are the way to deal with him.

    I've told them they need to move all her things into the garage and that I'd help. List it all and then send him a certified letter, telling him he's got "X" days to get it all or we'll dispose of it however we see fit.

    Seeing as he's an attorney and as I recall once, has laughingly said "it's my JOB to piss people off" (or some derivation of that) I don't want to get into a situaton of "he said, she said" with him.

    He's a fairly arrogant idiot, shown little regard for his mother (as far as we saw her in OUR world...which, since she LIVED here, was actually quite a bit).

    I want to somehow make this clean and give him ONE chance to deal with it and if he fails to deal with it, then his door of recourse, will be closed.

    Any suggestions, or is my "move to garage, make list, send certified with receipt letter" sufficient???

    Thanks for any thoughts and for reading the small novel.

  2. #2
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
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    Default Re: Death & dealing with her son

    Richard, I think your best bet would be to tell an attorney (not related to, or associated with, her son) what you just told us and get his opinion. Laws may vary in different states.

    Now that said, and for a purely uneducated personal opinion, I think it would be a good idea to do exactly as you suggested.
    Bird

  3. #3
    Elite Member AlanB's Avatar
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    Default Re: Death & dealing with her son

    I guess I would just call and ask if he wanted to come get the stuff, or if he would just like us to donate it to goodwill. I doubt he wants too fool with that stuff. Most places goodwill or similar organisations will come by and pick it up.

  4. #4
    Super Member scott_vt's Avatar
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    Default Re: Death & dealing with her son

    Quote Originally Posted by Bird
    Richard, I think your best bet would be to tell an attorney (not related to, or associated with, her son) what you just told us and get his opinion. Laws may vary in different states.

    Now that said, and for a purely uneducated personal opinion, I think it would be a good idea to do exactly as you suggested.
    Afternoon Richard,
    I have to agree with Bird. Speak to an independent attorney in your area familiar with the local laws and go from there ! Armed with that info you will be better prepared to make an educated decision that wont backfire on you !

    Good Luck !
    scotty

    ,,,course,,it is gas,and gas is,,well,gas,,so,,but it kills the @#$$ oughta them yellow jackets,,,thingy

    http://www.tractorbynet.com/content/...onth-scott_vt/

  5. #5
    Super Star Member EddieWalker's Avatar
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    Default Re: Death & dealing with her son

    Is it really allot of stuff? In the light of her passing and you'd just as soon not deal with them anymore, I'd rent or borrow a truck/trailer and just bring it back to her. It will take you half a day and you'd be done wtih it. Forever.

    Messing around, moving it from one place to another, sending letters, talking to lawyers and all that is more effort and stress then just getting it done.

    Eddie

  6. #6
    Elite Member Richard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Death & dealing with her son

    I've got a friend who's an attorney (not estate however)

    He said my idea of collect/list/letter would be a good idea.

    The idea has further evolved inside my head... the wake is this Saturday and funeral Sunday.

    I think I'll suggest father in law or perhaps myself take that as an opportunity to express our sorrows... & let them know we have a couple things. It's not many in quantity however, I don't know if the items would have any sentimental value to the boys. The treadmill is probably the most expensive item and I'd guess it's worth several hundred??? (clueless)

    Anyway, what I think I'll suggest we do is grab one/both of them and say we have this stuff and would be happy to hold it for them...and can they perhaps make arraingements to pick it up within 30 days.

    After 30 days when they (as I suspect) ignore it, THEN I can send the 'reminder letter' and give them another 30 days. The letter will tell them 30 more days then off to Goodwill it goes (or trash heap, depending on what it is)

    This way we can be the 'nice guy' looking out for their best interests, yet keep the wheels turning and hopefully, the fire lit under their feet to deal with this.

  7. #7
    Super Star Member IslandTractor's Avatar
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    Default Re: Death & dealing with her son

    Quote Originally Posted by EddieWalker
    Is it really allot of stuff? In the light of her passing and you'd just as soon not deal with them anymore, I'd rent or borrow a truck/trailer and just bring it back to her. It will take you half a day and you'd be done wtih it. Forever.

    Messing around, moving it from one place to another, sending letters, talking to lawyers and all that is more effort and stress then just getting it done.

    Eddie
    I want Eddie as my lawyer. Very reasonable advice. Forget the litiginous route and just be a good neighbor. After all, even if her son is a jerk, she was certainly nice to your FIL for many years.
    Last edited by IslandTractor; 02-08-2007 at 03:49 PM.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Death & dealing with her son

    Richard,

    probably others wil disagee but I feel 'funny' reading about your idea to approach the family at the wake/funeral about her belongings. I'm jsut not thinking that it is the "right" setting. it may offer a convenient opportunity for you, but it jsut doesn't seem right to me. You asked for advice so I am not writing this to criticize, not by any means, jsut to give you a different opinion.
    1 Goldini Tractor & 1 Articulated Staub Tractor
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  9. #9
    Elite Member Richard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Death & dealing with her son

    Rox, I actually appreciate that and think you might be right. I hadn't really thought of that angle as MOST of the family thoughts for the last several months have been how to get them to get this stuff.

    Not to sound like a sphincter but since her house is an hour away and I don't have any truck, I'm clearly NOT inclined to go rent something and take care of this. Heck... I can't even LIFT the silly thing to get it to the truck. Regardless of what happens..this will be a couple person job. I don't mind helping them & being that second person but I DO clearly view it as their situation to deal with.

    Rox...thank you. I'm taking your thoughts to heart and will not bring it up for at least a time frame after this is all over.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Death & dealing with her son

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard
    Rox, I actually appreciate that and think you might be right. I hadn't really thought of that angle as MOST of the family thoughts for the last several months have been how to get them to get this stuff.

    Not to sound like a sphincter but since her house is an hour away and I don't have any truck, I'm clearly NOT inclined to go rent something and take care of this. Heck... I can't even LIFT the silly thing to get it to the truck. Regardless of what happens..this will be a couple person job. I don't mind helping them & being that second person but I DO clearly view it as their situation to deal with.

    Rox...thank you. I'm taking your thoughts to heart and will not bring it up for at least a time frame after this is all over.

    Richard your very clear on your feelings but I've learned a few times in the past that sucking it up and just getting it done sometimes gets things over faster than other methods.

    So I'm with Eddie that renting a truck, loading such items and dropping them off a few weeks after the funeral might be less painful than all the other idea's which just drag all of this out for you and everyone else.

    But again you've been very clear and such but your story seems to just bring back memories of my situation. I just wished I'd did all the BS earlier vs all the lost sleep, phone calls and such. You might want to think about that rental truck.

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