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  1. #11
    Super Member flusher's Avatar
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    Jun 2005
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    6,358
    Location
    Northern California-Tehama Co.
    Tractor
    2008 Mahindra 5525, 1964 MF-135 diesel, 1951 Farmall Super A, 1951 Minneapolis Moline BF, 1945 Oliver 60 Row Crop, 1949 JD B widefront

    Default Re: My Cub is toast

    Quote Originally Posted by Soundguy View Post
    preheat.. use propane .. it's cheap.

    consider stitch / dowling the repair first if you can.. they will help prevent distortion too, also if you can bolt the flange to a jig to keep it true instead of drawing like it will want too.

    slow cool.. peen to reduce stress...
    Thanks for the hints.
    I thought stitching (Lock-n-Stitch?) only worked on cracks where the pieces were cracked partially and are still together. My problem is different since that bolster attachment flange cracked off completely from the block.

  2. #12
    Gold Member mjw357's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    361
    Location
    The Sticks, Ohio
    Tractor
    Kubota B3200

    Default Re: My Cub is toast

    Don't know squat about welding or the particulars of how this thing goes together, but could you make some sort of gusset or backing plate out of 1" steel plate? Might have to get a little machining done to make holes and shapes line up. Just thinking out loud, closest I have ever gotten to welding is sweating copper water pipes.
    Kubota B3200 with LA504 FEL and Woods HC54 brushhog

    Looking for: Pallet Forks

  3. #13
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    47,271
    Location
    Central florida
    Tractor
    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: My Cub is toast

    my reference is towards stitch / dowling. ie, see if you can find places to drill thru the broken off flange into the parent metal and then prep for a dowel or threaded dowel (stud ) machine the area of the flange so you can put a pal nut on and literally bolt he part into place using a couple studs and nuts and then weld up and weld the studs head in or grind off, etc.. etc.

    Think of it like rebar in concrete. ie.. something bridging the 2 parts.

    iv'e done it on cracked shotgun but stocks using dowel rod to secure 2 parts before gluing, then trimming dowels off, sanding and re-staining.

    have done it on limited basis with metal repair.

    as for the jig.. weld up something that can bolt to the block and mate with t he flange to hold it true once you have it doweled ( if you go that route, or otherwise hold it true and tight, and then do the welds. this will prevent the flange from drawing one way or the other and thus being deformed and not stressed and try to re-crack along the repair when you bolt it up and are forcing pressure against the bent part.

    ps.. go into this repair knowing you have a bad block, and think of it as a practice or learning experience.. if the repair fails.. you still learned some techniques.. if it works, you went from a bad block, to one that may be bad again.. at some point or may not...

    one last thing. if there are areas that you could add external stiffeners on either the inside or outside, investigage that and then find some plate or thick angle you can heat and form on an anvil to match contour perfectly, and then find appropriate places to bolt it thr/to the block and damaged flange. BT/DT using a 'sandwich plate on a broken ear on a casting /flange where I had access to both sides .. ie.. to the top/outside of the damaged flange and to the back side of the flange it mated with.. used a plate on either side and long bolts thru.. plates were shaped like the flange and extened thru a couple more bolt holes down each side to spread out streeses to areas past the damage. I see repairs liek that on loader tractors all the time where soemthing breaks out a loader attach pont in a piece of cast, adn they scab a subframe around it using other fasteners to carry the weight , plus the repaired area.

    soundguy

  4. #14
    Elite Member jonyyuma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,972
    Location
    35 miles North of Memphis,TN
    Tractor
    kubota L3000dt, ford 8n1952

    Default Re: My Cub is toast

    I repaired Cub Head ,,with these methods, Be sure not weld too much at a time..Like soundman said about 1 inch..Watch for flux when you are peening..I had to touch up a spot,, as it was a water jacket. I had a deep vee ground out and used the nickle rods.
    Okay, Legal disclaimer: Old but not senile, definitely do not have the answer to everything!

  5. #15
    Super Member flusher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    6,358
    Location
    Northern California-Tehama Co.
    Tractor
    2008 Mahindra 5525, 1964 MF-135 diesel, 1951 Farmall Super A, 1951 Minneapolis Moline BF, 1945 Oliver 60 Row Crop, 1949 JD B widefront

    Default Re: My Cub is toast

    Quote Originally Posted by Soundguy View Post
    my reference is towards stitch / dowling. ie, see if you can find places to drill thru the broken off flange into the parent metal and then prep for a dowel or threaded dowel (stud ) machine the area of the flange so you can put a pal nut on and literally bolt he part into place using a couple studs and nuts and then weld up and weld the studs head in or grind off, etc.. etc.

    Think of it like rebar in concrete. ie.. something bridging the 2 parts.

    iv'e done it on cracked shotgun but stocks using dowel rod to secure 2 parts before gluing, then trimming dowels off, sanding and re-staining.

    have done it on limited basis with metal repair.

    as for the jig.. weld up something that can bolt to the block and mate with t he flange to hold it true once you have it doweled ( if you go that route, or otherwise hold it true and tight, and then do the welds. this will prevent the flange from drawing one way or the other and thus being deformed and not stressed and try to re-crack along the repair when you bolt it up and are forcing pressure against the bent part.

    ps.. go into this repair knowing you have a bad block, and think of it as a practice or learning experience.. if the repair fails.. you still learned some techniques.. if it works, you went from a bad block, to one that may be bad again.. at some point or may not...

    one last thing. if there are areas that you could add external stiffeners on either the inside or outside, investigage that and then find some plate or thick angle you can heat and form on an anvil to match contour perfectly, and then find appropriate places to bolt it thr/to the block and damaged flange. BT/DT using a 'sandwich plate on a broken ear on a casting /flange where I had access to both sides .. ie.. to the top/outside of the damaged flange and to the back side of the flange it mated with.. used a plate on either side and long bolts thru.. plates were shaped like the flange and extened thru a couple more bolt holes down each side to spread out streeses to areas past the damage. I see repairs liek that on loader tractors all the time where soemthing breaks out a loader attach pont in a piece of cast, adn they scab a subframe around it using other fasteners to carry the weight , plus the repaired area.

    soundguy
    OK, now I understand what you're saying. Good idea--I'll see what I can do along those lines. There are plenty of holes close to the break area for the timing gear cover. I could use several of these to carry a backing plate to align the broken part on the block prior to drilling and welding.

    Don't know about a permanent stiffener-- i.e. if it's feasible to scab something in that area of the block. I'll check some of the Cub enthusiasts websites later today to see if anyone there has come up with a stiffener design or some other neat fix.

  6. #16
    Super Member flusher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    6,358
    Location
    Northern California-Tehama Co.
    Tractor
    2008 Mahindra 5525, 1964 MF-135 diesel, 1951 Farmall Super A, 1951 Minneapolis Moline BF, 1945 Oliver 60 Row Crop, 1949 JD B widefront

    Default Re: My Cub is toast

    Quote Originally Posted by jonyyuma View Post
    I repaired Cub Head ,,with these methods, Be sure not weld too much at a time..Like soundman said about 1 inch..Watch for flux when you are peening..I had to touch up a spot,, as it was a water jacket. I had a deep vee ground out and used the nickle rods.
    Thanks for the input. I'll practice welding with the nickel rods on some scrap cast iron. None of the local welding suppliers had any in stock so I ordered some Ferroweld sticks off the Web.

  7. #17
    Veteran Member chad22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    1,368
    Location
    Kansas right now but Arkansas soon
    Tractor
    Sears Garden Tractor with home built loader

    Default Re: My Cub is toast

    That's a nice old tractor. Hope your able to get it fixed.

    Chad
    Fixing Up Old 1960's Santafe Travel Trailer
    Click the above link to see pics of a travel trailer I scored for free that I'm going to fix up to go camping in.

    Welded A new Spindle Into Axle
    I repaired a broken axle by welding a new spindle into the old axle for my camper trailer. Click the link to see pics.

  8. #18
    Super Member flusher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    6,358
    Location
    Northern California-Tehama Co.
    Tractor
    2008 Mahindra 5525, 1964 MF-135 diesel, 1951 Farmall Super A, 1951 Minneapolis Moline BF, 1945 Oliver 60 Row Crop, 1949 JD B widefront

    Default Re: My Cub is toast

    Quote Originally Posted by chad22 View Post
    That's a nice old tractor. Hope your able to get it fixed.

    Chad
    It's kaput--I'm parting it out.

  9. #19
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
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    Mar 2002
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    47,271
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    Central florida
    Tractor
    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: My Cub is toast

    too bad.. sorry to hear it wasn't repairable. i knew with that type of damage it was going to be a long shot anyway.

    oh well.. do part it.. don't scrap anything but the single broken casting. every single piece can be used.. piston crank and all..

  10. #20
    Super Member flusher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    Location
    Northern California-Tehama Co.
    Tractor
    2008 Mahindra 5525, 1964 MF-135 diesel, 1951 Farmall Super A, 1951 Minneapolis Moline BF, 1945 Oliver 60 Row Crop, 1949 JD B widefront

    Default Re: My Cub is toast

    Quote Originally Posted by Soundguy View Post
    too bad.. sorry to hear it wasn't repairable. i knew with that type of damage it was going to be a long shot anyway.

    oh well.. do part it.. don't scrap anything but the single broken casting. every single piece can be used.. piston crank and all..
    You're right--everything is usable except the block. I'm looking for another Cub locally. No hurry--the hunt is the best part of the deal

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