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  1. #11
    Gold Member 6thgpSF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    356
    Location
    N.E. Kansas
    Tractor
    YM1610d

    Default Re: serated plastic blades on trimmer vs string?

    I've got a Sthil FS90 and have tried the plastic blades and was'nt impressed.The metal blade works good,just have to be careful around rocks etc. One thing I found odd about the Sthil plastic blades,the instructions say to soak them in water.Maybe someone can shed some insight into why one has to do this....russ

  2. #12
    Silver Member Branchchipper's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    118
    Location
    So. Washington Cascades

    Default Re: serated plastic blades on trimmer vs string?

    Quote Originally Posted by 6thgpSF View Post
    I've got a Sthil FS90 and have tried the plastic blades and was'nt impressed.The metal blade works good,just have to be careful around rocks etc. One thing I found odd about the Sthil plastic blades,the instructions say to soak them in water.Maybe someone can shed some insight into why one has to do this....russ
    Our Stihl dealer has always said that when soaked in water, the plastic cutters are a bit denser and last a little longer. I did so for years, but they just wore down too quickly regardless. I finally settled on just heavy-duty string instead, with very heavy metal blades on an FS250 as an alternative for the worst stuff. There is a special replacement shield called a Limit Stop that Stihl makes for use with the heavier blades. It is all aluminum, and not that expensive. You can saw down small trees with the FS250 so equipped. We use two different styles of metal blades made locally- one is round and works with the limit stop to cut almost anything (Includes downward-facing shredder blades), and the other is a 3-lobe style that works with the plastic shield and cuts berry canes and such just as well (but doesn't "saw"). We field sharpen them (hand file) several times per day when really using them hard. Any of the metal blades require the steel spacer underneath to keep the blade off of the ground.
    Finally, I can attest to the importance of PPE, especially steel-toed boots (and sawyer's chaps) for any hard-core brush cutting, even when using string...
    Branchchipper

  3. #13
    Bronze Member Susanjoyce's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    60
    Location
    Alexandria, ohio
    Tractor
    Craftsman

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Branchchipper

    Our Stihl dealer has always said that when soaked in water, the plastic cutters are a bit denser and last a little longer. I did so for years, but they just wore down too quickly regardless. I finally settled on just heavy-duty string instead, with very heavy metal blades on an FS250 as an alternative for the worst stuff. There is a special replacement shield called a Limit Stop that Stihl makes for use with the heavier blades. It is all aluminum, and not that expensive. You can saw down small trees with the FS250 so equipped. We use two different styles of metal blades made locally- one is round and works with the limit stop to cut almost anything (Includes downward-facing shredder blades), and the other is a 3-lobe style that works with the plastic shield and cuts berry canes and such just as well (but doesn't "saw"). We field sharpen them (hand file) several times per day when really using them hard. Any of the metal blades require the steel spacer underneath to keep the blade off of the ground.
    Finally, I can attest to the importance of PPE, especially steel-toed boots (and sawyer's chaps) for any hard-core brush cutting, even when using string...
    I've now got a really bum shoulder and my Husqvarna L323 has been to the shop one too many times. The last time I was there, I looked at the Stihls, especially the one that takes different attachments. And a friend suggested I get an electric start. Does anyone have experience with either of these, and can advise? Thanks a lot!

    (Oh,, and my shins attest to the need for protection. I used to work for a lawn care guy and I approached him to ask a question while he was trimming. He turned--and I screamed. Later, when I'd started to heal, he told me, "That's why you shouldn't be wearing shorts.". I kept wearing them--just poked him with a stick when he was trimming and I needed him.)

  4. #14
    Silver Member JOE G's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    237
    Location
    Eastern NY
    Tractor
    Husqvarna / John Deere

    Default Re: serated plastic blades on trimmer vs string?

    I use the Plastic Blades from Stihl ( Cutting head also takes string so you can use both at once ) when I am clearing some real thick or heavier grass. The plastic blades work very well and hold up well also.
    Husqvarna YTH24V48LS
    John Deere LT 133
    Husqvarna 7021P
    Husqvarna 562XP Woods Ported with .025 pop up Muffler Mod
    Husqvarna Rancher 55 2005
    Husqvarna 450 Anniversary Edition 2010
    STIHL 009 1998
    STIHL HT 131 Pole Saw 2012
    STIHL FS 110 R Trimmer 2010
    STIHL BR 600 Magnum Blower2012

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