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  1. #1
    Elite Member thcri's Avatar
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    Default Finding my Raspberry Plants

    Haven't been around here much in years but if I remember right the group had a full forum dedicated to just gardening, flowers and other yard stuff forum. I thought it was called gardenbynet. No equipment or machinery so not sure if it exists anymore so will ask my question here.

    I planted a whole bunch of raspberries oh ten years ago. The last two years I have ignored them and allowed them to grow over themselves. I want to make raised beds and transplant the original shoots and not the wild shoots. I cut them off at the ground last year hoping I could find them but it did not help. Has anyone done this before and what do you look for or can I use any of the wild shoots being they will do as good as the originals?
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  2. #2
    Elite Member Baby Grand's Avatar
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    Default Re: Finding my Raspberry Plants

    Gardenweb?

    GardenWeb - The Internet's Garden Community

    Sorry - I don't know much about the raspberries, but I do think there are different types that you have to treat differently.
    I think some bear fruit on new vs old wood? I do know there's few things so nice as a fist full of just picked raspberries.
    Someone on here will show up with better info ...
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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Finding my Raspberry Plants

    The original plants and the shoots are same plant, they propogate by sending out shoots underground. Just transplant the shoots. It's my understanding that in general two-year-old shoots bear fruit, after that they will mainly die off.

  4. #4
    Elite Member thcri's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TCJatko View Post
    The original plants and the shoots are same plant, they propogate by sending out shoots underground. Just transplant the shoots. It's my understanding that in general two-year-old shoots bear fruit, after that they will mainly die off.
    Yes I know they are of the same plant. I have had good luck over the years with raspberries I just left them get out of control. I did find one of the originals that I will be able to break up so that will be good.
    "This country was founded and built by people with great dreams and the courage to take great risks."

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Finding my Raspberry Plants

    Don't transplant them right now. (July) Their root system is really spread out, and you will get serious wilt back. Build your raised beds for them, get them weed free. This fall, when the leaves start changing, go in there and find the canes that had fruit, and snip them at the ground. Any new growth, snip at about 12-16 inches. Transplant with a full shovel of soil. (I cut the root ball on 4 sides with a trenching shovel.) Working carefully for resale I can lift about 10 raspberries per hour this way, and trim to fit a pot. You don't need to do that.


    Water them in with 1 rounded tablespoon per 5 gallon pail of water soluble 10-51-10 fertilizer.

    Plant them about 18" to 2 feet apart. Mulch with 10-12 layers of newspaper and wood chip mulch for weed control. You will need to remove the mulch for a few weeks in spring to allow new shoots to start.


    Raspberries need support. The easiest way is a post at each end of the row, with a wire every foot. As the canes grow in spring, tie them to the wire. One trick: Alternate sides each year if they are floricanes (bear on 2nd year wood.) That makes fall maintenance easier. You can use scraps of yarn for tying. But you can also get double sided velcro tape. This is reusuable, and can be moved up the wire ladder as needed.

    Primacane raspberries bear on first year wood in fall. Floricane on 2nd year wood in mid summer. If you seriously like raspberries on your cornflakes, plant a row of both for raspberries for 2-3 months.

    New canes are cheap, 5-10 bucks per dozen, and you get some advances in breeding. Right now, here, Souris (a descendent of Boyne) rules because it has better yield and better winterkill resistance. For primacane, Double Delight is popular.

    One of the advantages of new canes is you aren't bringing in weedy soil into your raised bed. But they tend to be small.

    You can do similar by cleaning all the soil of your transplants, but for that wait until they are fully dormant. You can trim ahead of time, but don't transplant until the 2nd or 3rd killing frost.
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  6. #6
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    Default Re: Finding my Raspberry Plants

    Maybe someone can enlighten me. Why bother to move to "original plants", of even focus on them? If you transplant runners, they will mature into exact copies of the original, won't they? Am I missing something? I understand not moving plants until after the growing season, but why focus on original plants? Are they somehow superior to the runners?

  7. #7
    Elite Member thcri's Avatar
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    Default

    Yes I plan on building the beds now in the next few weeks but will not transplant until late fall as you say.



    This video here is the bed I plan on making. I got the fence posts and everything.


    http://youtube.com/watch?v=cgPxW4NmN1o
    "This country was founded and built by people with great dreams and the courage to take great risks."

  8. #8
    Elite Member thcri's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SGBotsford View Post
    Don't transplant them right now. (July) Their root system is really spread out, and you will get serious wilt back. Build your raised beds for them, get them weed free. This fall, when the leaves start changing, go in there and find the canes that had fruit, and snip them at the ground. Any new growth, snip at about 12-16 inches. Transplant with a full shovel of soil. (I cut the root ball on 4 sides with a trenching shovel.) Working carefully for resale I can lift about 10 raspberries per hour this way, and trim to fit a pot. You don't need to do that.

    Water them in with 1 rounded tablespoon per 5 gallon pail of water soluble 10-51-10 fertilizer.

    Plant them about 18" to 2 feet apart. Mulch with 10-12 layers of newspaper and wood chip mulch for weed control. You will need to remove the mulch for a few weeks in spring to allow new shoots to start.

    Raspberries need support. The easiest way is a post at each end of the row, with a wire every foot. As the canes grow in spring, tie them to the wire. One trick: Alternate sides each year if they are floricanes (bear on 2nd year wood.) That makes fall maintenance easier. You can use scraps of yarn for tying. But you can also get double sided velcro tape. This is reusuable, and can be moved up the wire ladder as needed.

    Primacane raspberries bear on first year wood in fall. Floricane on 2nd year wood in mid summer. If you seriously like raspberries on your cornflakes, plant a row of both for raspberries for 2-3 months.

    New canes are cheap, 5-10 bucks per dozen, and you get some advances in breeding. Right now, here, Souris (a descendent of Boyne) rules because it has better yield and better winterkill resistance. For primacane, Double Delight is popular.

    One of the advantages of new canes is you aren't bringing in weedy soil into your raised bed. But they tend to be small.

    You can do similar by cleaning all the soil of your transplants, but for that wait until they are fully dormant. You can trim ahead of time, but don't transplant until the 2nd or 3rd killing frost.



    Yes I plan on building the beds now in the next few weeks but will not transplant until late fall as you say.



    This video here is the bed I plan on making. I got the fence posts and everything.


    http://youtube.com/watch?v=cgPxW4NmN1o
    "This country was founded and built by people with great dreams and the courage to take great risks."

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