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  1. #1
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    Default Help!

    Hello,

    I am looking for the names of small/medium sized, inexpensive, and servicable tractors that would be useful for plowing snow, mowing 5+ acres, and row cultivating a small hobby garden.

    I've restored old vehicles (Willy's Jeeps), so I am very comfortable with fixing, welding, and restoring older vehicles.

    I guess what I'm getting at is I want are the makes/models of older (re: affordable) serviceable tractor for which parts are still available. I am new to tractors, so I don't really know where to start. [For example do ford 8n's or farmall A's fit this category?]

    Kindly,
    M

  2. #2
    Platinum Member MFRED's Avatar
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    Mar 2006
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    954
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    Connecticut
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    MF 5435, MF 165

    Default Re: Help!

    The cheapest would probably be the N-series fords, the TO-fergusons, the farmalls would work as well. I would think the fords & fergusons first. The 3pt hitch wil help make it easier to find mowers and cultivator and such.

    Parts are pretty easy to come by on any of those older models. They can be bought pretty cheap, even cheaper if you can and are willing to tinker with them.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Help!

    Quote Originally Posted by MFRED View Post
    The cheapest would probably be the N-series fords, the TO-fergusons, the farmalls would work as well. I would think the fords & fergusons first. The 3pt hitch wil help make it easier to find mowers and cultivator and such.

    Parts are pretty easy to come by on any of those older models. They can be bought pretty cheap, even cheaper if you can and are willing to tinker with them.
    MFred,

    I'm in Northern NY (near Canada), I've checked the local want ads and there seem to be Ford 8/9n's, Fergusen TO-s that are nearly identical (visually anyway) to the fords, several allis B/C's, and Farmall A's, H's, and cubs in my price range.

    Besides the 3pt hitch on the N-series and TO-s, is there any reason to consider these over the others?

    PS - I enjoy tinkering ...

    Kindly,
    Matt

  4. #4
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    2,876
    Location
    Carroll, Ohio
    Tractor
    IH Farmall 656 gas/ IH 240 Utility/ 2, Super C Farmalls/ 2, Farmall A's/ Farmall BN/McCormick-Deering OS-6/McCormick-Deering O-4/ '36 Farmall F-12/ 480 Case hoe. '65 Ford 2000 3 cyl., 4 spd. w/3 spd Aux. Trans

    Default Re: Help!

    Both will do the job, just a preference of ease of changing implements, and usage. The Farmalls had the culti-vision feature, which was great for cutlivating. You're actually looking right down on one row, to keep on track. The drawback..? Mounting the cultivators... Takes a while, and can be dangerous...

    Or unless you are like a buddy of mine who has several Allis CA's. Dedicating a tractor for one job..., except the one he plow's and disks with. One for the mounted planter, and the one to cultivate with...

    Ford and Fergies..?? Most implements are 3 pt. Ease of hooking up and going. Drawbacks..?? Looking back to see what you're cultivating. Probably best to not..., LOL.. At least I have a tendency to maybe turn the wheel a bit, and would probably root out some plants... So many more options for implements with the 3pt.

    Parts readily available for either...

    Either way you go, I would suggest models with hydraulics to raise implements... The IH Fast Hitch System is pretty handy in the hooking, and unhooking catagory, but seem to be expensive now, if you can find them.

    I myself use both... Plow or disk with which ever one strikes my fancy. As far as cultivating, I use my trusty ole' Sears and Roebuck David Bradley to do the cultivating. When the sweetcorn gets too high for it, I bring out the Lodge & Shipley single wheeler.

  5. #5
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    2,876
    Location
    Carroll, Ohio
    Tractor
    IH Farmall 656 gas/ IH 240 Utility/ 2, Super C Farmalls/ 2, Farmall A's/ Farmall BN/McCormick-Deering OS-6/McCormick-Deering O-4/ '36 Farmall F-12/ 480 Case hoe. '65 Ford 2000 3 cyl., 4 spd. w/3 spd Aux. Trans

    Default Re: Help!

    Quote Originally Posted by stoichiometry View Post
    MFred,

    I'm in Northern NY (near Canada), I've checked the local want ads and there seem to be Ford 8/9n's, Fergusen TO-s that are nearly identical (visually anyway) to the fords, several allis B/C's, and Farmall A's, H's, and cubs in my price range.

    Besides the 3pt hitch on the N-series and TO-s, is there any reason to consider these over the others?

    PS - I enjoy tinkering ...

    Kindly,
    Matt
    If it came down between a Ford or Ferguson, I myself would prefer the Fergie, because of the OHV engine vs. the flathead Ford.... Again, just personal preference...

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Help!

    Quote Originally Posted by DJ54 View Post
    Both will do the job, just a preference of ease of changing implements, and usage. The Farmalls had the culti-vision feature, which was great for cutlivating. You're actually looking right down on one row, to keep on track. The drawback..? Mounting the cultivators... Takes a while, and can be dangerous...

    Or unless you are like a buddy of mine who has several Allis CA's. Dedicating a tractor for one job..., except the one he plow's and disks with. One for the mounted planter, and the one to cultivate with...

    Ford and Fergies..?? Most implements are 3 pt. Ease of hooking up and going. Drawbacks..?? Looking back to see what you're cultivating. Probably best to not..., LOL.. At least I have a tendency to maybe turn the wheel a bit, and would probably root out some plants... So many more options for implements with the 3pt.

    Parts readily available for either...

    Either way you go, I would suggest models with hydraulics to raise implements... The IH Fast Hitch System is pretty handy in the hooking, and unhooking catagory, but seem to be expensive now, if you can find them.

    I myself use both... Plow or disk with which ever one strikes my fancy. As far as cultivating, I use my trusty ole' Sears and Roebuck David Bradley to do the cultivating. When the sweetcorn gets too high for it, I bring out the Lodge & Shipley single wheeler.

    DJ54,

    If you had just under 2k and found a fergie T0-020, Ford 8n (also a 9n), farmall A, Farmall cub, and Allis C all in your price range, which one would you look at first?

    Kindly,
    M

  7. #7
    Elite Member
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    Jan 2009
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    Location
    Carroll, Ohio
    Tractor
    IH Farmall 656 gas/ IH 240 Utility/ 2, Super C Farmalls/ 2, Farmall A's/ Farmall BN/McCormick-Deering OS-6/McCormick-Deering O-4/ '36 Farmall F-12/ 480 Case hoe. '65 Ford 2000 3 cyl., 4 spd. w/3 spd Aux. Trans

    Default Re: Help!

    If I were going to be using multiple, strictly 3pt. attachments, The TO-20 first, Ford second. If you're planning on a finish mower application, and using it to plow, disk, and cultivate in a garden, realistically, you're looking at changing the mower, and cultivators at least once a week, in normal growing conditions. If not, one or the other is going to get away from you.

    I just always liked the little Continental OHV engines, over the flatheads. As mentioned, just personal preference.

    If you were truck patching 2-3 acres, I'd have both.., 3 pt for 75% of the work, and dedicate the cultivating to something with the cultivision... But since you are not, and want a multi-use, row crop tractor, I'd choose the TO.

    I worked with an older fellow that he and his brother farmed 160 acres with 2, TO-20's. Of course that was back when things were a lot more diversified on the farm. Maybe 1/3 of that acreage was divided equally, into row crops, hay, and pasture.

    If that sounds like a lot for those two little tractor's, there is a family farm in the county that has been passed down through the generations. Back in the early 1900's they farmed 800-1000 acres with 22 teams of horses. That was until they bought their first new John Deere unstyled B, with 2 bottom plow to help out with the plowing... can you imagine..??

    I guess no worse than busting up the Prarie with 4 or so bottoms, and not seeing the end of the field in sight..., LOL...

  8. #8
    Super Member flusher's Avatar
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    Sacramento
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    Getting old. Sold the ranch. Sold the tractors. Moved back to the city.

    Default Re: Help!

    Quote Originally Posted by stoichiometry View Post
    Hello,

    I am looking for the names of small/medium sized, inexpensive, and servicable tractors that would be useful for plowing snow, mowing 5+ acres, and row cultivating a small hobby garden.

    I've restored old vehicles (Willy's Jeeps), so I am very comfortable with fixing, welding, and restoring older vehicles.

    I guess what I'm getting at is I want are the makes/models of older (re: affordable) serviceable tractor for which parts are still available. I am new to tractors, so I don't really know where to start. [For example do ford 8n's or farmall A's fit this category?]

    Kindly,
    M
    Farmall Cub, Farmall A, Farmall Super A. These tractors are designed for small acreage mowing and cultivating. Used mowers and cultivators are available on eBay and craigslist. And there are a lot of them still around and running.

    My Cub cost $1100 (no implements, just a pto and simple hitch)

    Help!-dscf0082-small-jpgHelp!-dscf0083-small-jpgHelp!-dscf0084-small-jpgHelp!-dscf0085-small-jpg

    my Super A cost $1300 including a 6-ft sicklebar mower and 3-point hitch.

    Help!-dscf0126-small-jpgHelp!-dscf0129-small-jpg

    Parts are readily available and these old tractors are easy to service and repair. You can get the manuals on CD and there are DVDs available to help you service and repair these old girls. Working on these simple tractors is a quick way to learn tractor repair.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Help!

    Quote Originally Posted by flusher View Post
    Farmall Cub, Farmall A, Farmall Super A. These tractors are designed for small acreage mowing and cultivating. Used mowers and cultivators are available on eBay and craigslist. And there are a lot of them still around and running.

    My Cub cost $1100 (no implements, just a pto and simple hitch)

    Help!-dscf0082-small-jpgHelp!-dscf0083-small-jpgHelp!-dscf0084-small-jpgHelp!-dscf0085-small-jpg

    my Super A cost $1300 including a 6-ft sicklebar mower and 3-point hitch.

    Help!-dscf0126-small-jpgHelp!-dscf0129-small-jpg

    Parts are readily available and these old tractors are easy to service and repair. You can get the manuals on CD and there are DVDs available to help you service and repair these old girls. Working on these simple tractors is a quick way to learn tractor repair.
    Flusher,

    I assume you are in favor of one of the farmalls? If you had to choose b/w a farmall A, Farmall cub, and farmall H [each of these are for sale within a reasonable driving distance] for snow plowing, some gardening, and mowing [and some brush hogging], which one?

    Kindly,
    M

  10. #10
    Veteran Member
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    Jul 2003
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    Location
    Central VA, USA
    Tractor
    Mahindra 6000 MWFD, 2 1950's Farmalls, 1974 Farmall 140, 1967 Mf 135Delux

    Default Re: Help!

    Stay away from the Farmall H if you plan on plowing snow...that is if its a tricyle..the front tires/wheels will fill with snow very easily as they are slightly "canted" and close together...also when that happens, you won't be able to steer it hardly at all...as far as the Super A, find a Super A, 100, 130, or 140 (this was the last iteration) with a 1pt fast hitch...the 3pt on Flushers is custom and didn't come on the SA. Woods still makes their finish mowers available with the 1pt attachment for them. Personally, I've got a Super C, 230, 140 Farmalls (all with Fast Hitch and have the 3pt adapter arms for the Super C and 230. Down here in the middle Atlantic any of the above Farmalls in good shape will run you $2500 to $4000 (without any implements). If you find one with implements for those prices its not a bad deal... BobG in VA

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