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  1. #1
    Veteran Member bluechip's Avatar
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    Jun 2003
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    1,840
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    Arkansas, USA

    Default 8n Oil in water?

    Just took another 8N on trade. This one seems to have black oil in the crankcase (not milky) and black oil in the radiator. I'm having a hard time guessing the cause since this is flathead and there would be little reason to have oil in the head, which rules out head gasket. Seems most problems would allow water into the oil easier than oil into the water?

    Anyone have an idea?

  2. #2
    Platinum Member Pooh_Bear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    739
    Location
    Dunlap TN 25 miles north of Chattanooga
    Tractor
    Early 1949 Ford 8N

    Default Re: 8n Oil in water?

    Black oil in the crank case?
    Pull the dipstick and smell the oil.
    Does is smell burnt. Change it anyway.

    I recently aquired my 49 8n.
    The coolant in the radiator seems to have a oily slimy feel to it.
    It has a dark color to it, maybe blackish.
    I'm guessing it is full of stop leak.
    I plan on changing all fluids soon as it gets warm enough.
    Could yours have the same problem.

    Pooh Bear

  3. #3
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
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    Mar 2002
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    Central florida
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    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: 8n Oil in water?

    While it is true that the flathead 8n doesn't have oil in the head, I've seen dozens of examples of combustion byproduct accumulation in the radiator from a blown head gasket. Let it go on for years and you can build up quite a bit 'oil' in the water.. though it usually does emulsify.

    That's the 'easy' idea.. and you can pull the head and invest in a new gasket to check that. Also.. by just looking the old gasket over, you may find an area that is bypassing.

    Starting the tractor cold and looing for compression in the radiator is another good way. keep in mind that the radiator on the 8n is a massive 4 psi system.. it's way easier for combustion gasses to get into the water than the other way around. And if you are unlucky enough to have a cracked block.. same thing applies. Even 15 psi of oil pressure will force into the radiator rather than letting 4 psi of water into the oil.

    Good luck

    I vote for the easy 15$ test of the headgasket first.

    And don't forget to clean the radiator good. I've seen units that had blown headgaskets manafest 'extra' oil in the water days later, just from 'leftovers' in the repaired system.

    Soundguy

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
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    579
    Location
    California , Idaho and a little island in Panama
    Tractor
    Kioti DK45TLB

    Default Re: 8n Oil in water?

    We had a tool in our shop that would check for a head leak by sampling the radiator coolant . Most better radiator shops should have this tool and it keeps you from having to pull the head to check it . I would call around and see if a radiator shop in your area has one . It only take a few minutes and we never charged for this service .
    Big Al

  5. #5
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
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    Central florida
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    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: 8n Oil in water?

    If it is checking for combustion by products.. it may be a tad useless on an old tractor that may have had lots of leaks over the years.. and no 100% cleanouts.

    If it is dye based however.. it may work pretty good after some run time.

    Soundguy

  6. #6
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    157
    Location
    Sebastopol, Ca.
    Tractor
    Kioti LK3054XS TLB, Ford 650, Ford 2000 Industrail w/loader

    Default Re: 8n Oil in water?

    If you know any shop with an infra-red tailpipe smog sniffer, that will work very well. Suction out 1"-2" or so of coolant from the system. While the engine is running, put the exhaust probe in the radiator, be sure not to get the probe into the coolant, just the air pocket. if you get more than 4-5 ppm on the HC's then you have a blown head gasket. works every time. Gary

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