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  1. #1
    Bronze Member barrybro's Avatar
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    Default Baling Twine

    For small square bales that will sit outside for an extended period of time, what is the right kind of baling twine to use?

    Barry

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Baling Twine

    Quote Originally Posted by barrybro View Post
    For small square bales that will sit outside for an extended period of time, what is the right kind of baling twine to use?
    Poly twine, anything else will fall apart in short order.

    Aaron Z
    A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
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  3. #3
    Bronze Member barrybro's Avatar
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    Default Re: Baling Twine

    I have seen some different strenghts (110, 130, 170), when would you use the higher strenths?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Baling Twine

    Quote Originally Posted by barrybro View Post
    I have seen some different strenghts (110, 130, 170), when would you use the higher strenths?
    When you make the bales tighter/heavier. If you run the bales light you can use the lighter stuff, however if you crank down on the bales and make 60-100# bales you will need heavier twine.

    Aaron Z
    A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Baling Twine

    I think your bigger problem will be your hay rotting if left to the elements. Square bales don't shed water.

  6. #6
    Bronze Member barrybro's Avatar
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    Default Re: Baling Twine

    My wife runs a pumpkin patch and we use them for hay bale mazes etc...

    Then I use the hay in the spring to fill in some ruts I have in my property.

  7. #7
    Bronze Member barrybro's Avatar
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    Default Re: Baling Twine


  8. #8
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    Default Re: Baling Twine

    Most square baler manufacturers recommend nothing less than 130 knot strength twine. I use 130 poly twine and have made up to an 80# bale with no problems at all. I would never use 110 and really don't have any need for 170 so 130 is where i would stay.

  9. #9
    Bronze Member barrybro's Avatar
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    Default Re: Baling Twine

    I will be doing straw next year, do I need to think about anything else?

    Barry

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Baling Twine

    I see twine talk going on here, and I've wondered for awhile what the scoop is on the various kinds. I've read a little buried in another posting from some time ago, but I've wondered about the expected performance of the various kinds of square baler twine.

    I'd been using sisal 10,000 twine in a JD 336 I used last year and in a Ford 532 I bought the end of last season. It seemed "normal" to me--just fairly decent wothout outstanding issues. (The 532 ongoing troubles are posted.) I've been going through knotter issues in that baler and just replaced both bill hooks with new ones, and haven't even tried them out yet--it has been torrential here, can't catch a break.

    It seems most guys here in this area of Va. use 9,000 sisal twine. I switched over to poly twine to see if that would help matters with my knotters before I replaced the bill hooks. It seems to act the same.

    The one thing I have notice with my bales, and those of other farmers, is that the poly seems to just pack a tighter bale. I realize this should be adjustable with the bale box squeezer cranks, but it just seems the poly bales are more tight and springy, which I rather like. I wondered if it just has some elasticity the sisal doesn't? I also had a couple rolls of 10,000 sisal twine get funky from setting in my twine box too long. They got spots on the bottom from the old half rusty metal floor (need to get to that, but actual baling is priority, you know), so every few feet there was a brown weak spot that would break occasionally. I assume poly would have a better shelf life under such circumstances.

    Anyway, if there is any particular reason to go with one over another other than bale weight, or perhaps just what a finicky knotter likes best, I'd like to know.

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