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  1. #1
    New Member
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    Jun 2010
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    3

    Default First time tractor buyer for haying

    Looking for a tractor w/ 65 to 125 HP for 50 acres of alfalfa. Have looked at IH 1066 and 1086, JD 3020 and 4020, seen New Hollands and Branson 5530 and 6530. Would like to be able to also disk and rip in addition to baling etc.
    Does anyone have any input on tractors above or suggestions? Especially on the Bransons.
    Thanks in advance,
    Sunup

  2. #2
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    173
    Location
    Fon du Lac, Wisconsin
    Tractor
    Kubota L3130,Case SC,Case D,John Deere 335.

    Default Re: First time tractor buyer for haying

    I have been out of farming for a while but when I was farming and when hay was ready getting parts if I had a breakdown was number one. I had a John Deere baler and a part broke when I have a lot of hay down. Went to the dealer and was told the part would have to be ordered and would be there next day. Told him I wish it were today I have hay down and rain coming. He went out in the lot a removed the part from another baler and off I went. Point is all those tractors will do the job but what brand will get you up and running fastest. In my area it would be first Deere and next Case IH.

  3. #3
    Elite Member JasG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,163
    Location
    CNY
    Tractor
    Kubota L3240

    Default Re: First time tractor buyer for haying

    I agree with James. The Deere will be the easiest to maintain, but also get a feel for you local dealer. Both our CaseIH dealer and the Deere dealer we deal with are great. Go out of there way even for our very small operation.

    The IH 1066 and 1086 were very good strong tractors. The torque amplifiers were kind of a weak spot but for 50 acrers pobably won't be an issue. I never liked the stacked PTO's due to the 540 shaft never seemed to line up right. These were also cold blooded compared to a Deere 20 or 40 series. Parts aren't always stocked, but usually a day away.

    The 3020 and 4020 are great tractors. I have spent many hours on several 4020's and my backhoe is a 500a which is a heavy duty 3020 with a backhoe frame wrapped around it. You might want to add 4040 and 4240 to your Deere model list. You might be able to pick up one of these for similar money to a 4020 due to the 4020's seem to be "hot" right now. I wouldn't recommend a 30 series Deere, they were cold blooded and didn't have the pulling power of the 20 or 40 series IMO. The 40 series also had the quad range tranny vs the 20 series syncro. They both had powershift with is a good trans, but expensive if something goes wrong.

    The 30 series are reliable tractors, just don't start good or have the torque rise of other Deere models.

    Search these forum and you will find lots more information.

  4. #4
    Platinum Member civesnedfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    599
    Location
    Central Maine
    Tractor
    2007 Mahindra 4530----1972 Massey Ferguson 1100

    Default Re: First time tractor buyer for haying

    Take a look at the JD 4320. I believe it was tested at 116hp. I have a buddy with a dairy farm that has one. It is basically the big brother to the 4020. Price seems to be better than the 4020. It is a 6 cyl turbo charged. In my opinion it is a real work horse and nimble too. He pulls a JD 1360 moco and no matter how tall or thick the grass is this tractor doesn't even break a sweat. If you have a choice go for the Power shift vs the Select shift.

  5. #5
    Super Member flusher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    6,344
    Location
    Northern California-Tehama Co.
    Tractor
    2008 Mahindra 5525, 1964 MF-135 diesel, 1951 Farmall Super A, 1951 Minneapolis Moline BF, 1945 Oliver 60 Row Crop, 1949 JD B widefront

    Default Re: First time tractor buyer for haying

    Quote Originally Posted by sunup View Post
    Looking for a tractor w/ 65 to 125 HP for 50 acres of alfalfa. Have looked at IH 1066 and 1086, JD 3020 and 4020, seen New Hollands and Branson 5530 and 6530. Would like to be able to also disk and rip in addition to baling etc.
    Does anyone have any input on tractors above or suggestions? Especially on the Bransons.
    Thanks in advance,
    Sunup
    Two of my neighbors have 35 hp Bransons and seem to like them. Heavy tractors, pretty simple--much like my Mahindra 5525 (54 hp engine, 45 hp pto).

    Another neighbor does 30 acres of irrigated alfalfa. He uses a MF 294 for planting with a Brillion seeder, for discing (when needed), and for raking with a dual side delivery rake setup. When he established the field a few years ago, he used a D7 Cat to pull a subsoiler to break up the hardpan down to about 2 feet depth. He does shallower ripping with an IH 4366

    -dscf0052-small-jpg

    He mows with a Hesston swather (13-ft head)

    -dscf0181-small-jpg

    and bales with a self-propelled NH500 baler

    -dscf0002-small-jpg

  6. #6
    Gold Member dmay's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    440
    Location
    Winnipeg, MB
    Tractor
    2010 JD2320

    Default Re: First time tractor buyer for haying

    Quote Originally Posted by sunup View Post
    Looking for a tractor w/ 65 to 125 HP for 50 acres of alfalfa. Have looked at IH 1066 and 1086, JD 3020 and 4020, seen New Hollands and Branson 5530 and 6530. Would like to be able to also disk and rip in addition to baling etc.
    Does anyone have any input on tractors above or suggestions? Especially on the Bransons.
    Thanks in advance,
    Sunup
    What you really need to do is choose your haying equipment before you choose your tractor. The equipment size will dictate the tractor size. Do you own any hay equipment currently? What size of bales do you intend to produce. Big equipment difference between what is needed for small squares and large round/squares. Also you mention only 50 acres. You may want, but for the acreage size, you do not need big equipment. I would save my money and get only what I need to bale the size of bale I want.

    Curious about your need to disk/rip a hay field? You only do this once ever 5-7 years when the hay field declines to produce and you want to renew/refresh the field. Why not custom this work out every 5 years and save your money buying a tractor and equipment suitable for this once per 5 year job.

    I used to own and hay 80 acres. I baled small squares. I used a MF265 tractor (65HP). A NH489 (9ft) mower/conditioner. A MF124 small square baler. A NH1002 bale wagon (55 bales). All 1973. Due to weather/rain being crazy I would often cut and bale just 25 acres each time. That way every task (cut/bale/pick&stack) was a pleasant 6 hour/day task. Check weather and repeat until done.

    Everyone is different. This worked for me.

  7. #7
    Super Member RickB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
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    7,213
    Location
    Eastern NY
    Tractor
    Case 885, JD 730D, Ford 4000

    Default Re: First time tractor buyer for haying

    Quote Originally Posted by civesnedfield View Post
    Take a look at the JD 4320. I believe it was tested at 116hp. I have a buddy with a dairy farm that has one. It is basically the big brother to the 4020. Price seems to be better than the 4020. It is a 6 cyl turbo charged. In my opinion it is a real work horse and nimble too. He pulls a JD 1360 moco and no matter how tall or thick the grass is this tractor doesn't even break a sweat. If you have a choice go for the Power shift vs the Select shift.
    He's going to have to look pretty hard for a 4320 powershift. They never built any.
    We have too much gun control.
    What we need is more idiot control.

  8. #8
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    3

    Default Re: First time tractor buyer for haying

    thank you all for your response and input
    sunup

  9. #9
    Platinum Member civesnedfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    599
    Location
    Central Maine
    Tractor
    2007 Mahindra 4530----1972 Massey Ferguson 1100

    Default Re: First time tractor buyer for haying

    Quote Originally Posted by RickB View Post
    He's going to have to look pretty hard for a 4320 powershift. They never built any.
    Yes you are correct sorry for my FOPA. Even so it is still the tractor I would recommend.

  10. #10
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
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    6,173
    Location
    central New York
    Tractor
    all makes and models

    Default Re: First time tractor buyer for haying

    Quote Originally Posted by JasG View Post
    I agree with James. The Deere will be the easiest to maintain, but also get a feel for you local dealer. Both our CaseIH dealer and the Deere dealer we deal with are great. Go out of there way even for our very small operation.

    The IH 1066 and 1086 were very good strong tractors. The torque amplifiers were kind of a weak spot but for 50 acrers pobably won't be an issue. I never liked the stacked PTO's due to the 540 shaft never seemed to line up right. These were also cold blooded compared to a Deere 20 or 40 series. Parts aren't always stocked, but usually a day away.

    The 30 series are reliable tractors, just don't start good or have the torque rise of other Deere models.

    Search these forum and you will find lots more information.
    I have worked in central NY with winter temps down to twenty plus below 0, Many a green farmer with 20 through 40 series that owned a red tractor for the manure spreader because as they would say "they start better unplugged then the green ones plugged in!

    Watch the 30 series, they had the same rear end as he 20 series and with the added weight they did have an update to the 40 series as they had a lot of failures within the first few years.

    I hadn't heard any farmer who disliked the two pto's on the back of the red tractors, beat having the oil running out because of not backing up step enough of a slope to have the oil running out the back when changing shafts from 1000 to 540 or vise-versa.

    The torque amplifiers when used properly would last 7,000-8,000 hours and longer. When used as a brake for the tractor to slow down they normally ran about 2,500 hours before failure. Many failures happened because of lack of knowledge of proper adjustments as well as the charge pump to the system got weak and kept driving and using the tractor because it still worked some!

    I don't know where other then you are more familier with the deere line that they are easier to work on? Pto job on red, four hours, deere split it! Brake job on red four hours, deere split it!

    Watch out for those that just had new pumps put in but not a brake job! Older deere's only filters the return not the pick-up on the oil so the first sign of the brake failure is actually the hydraulic pump failure!

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