Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 30
  1. #11
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,930
    Location
    Up State S.C.
    Tractor
    AC WD 34 hp/3500 lbs MF 261 60 hp/5380 lbs

    Default Re: Making hay without a bailer

    Quote Originally Posted by tucker2 View Post
    No, I was told bush hog made models where one side was removable, this was for cutting hay. I plan to cut out one side of a old cutter I have.
    Someone, maybe Bushog, called the removable side a 'hay door'. The theory is, that being knocked around under the deck crushes the crop giving a result similar to a conditioner, and makes it dry faster. In my experience the mower threw the hay out the side before chopping it up too fine.
    I've used a 5' Woods Cadet with a hay door to cut hay and was well satisfied with the job it did in springy, pasture grasses. I wasn't satisfied with the way it cut long stemmed crops like Sudan Grass or Millet because the tractor tires bent and broke the stems and the mower would't pick them back up, or cut them, causing me to lose hay.
    Last edited by stuckmotor; 04-16-2013 at 08:26 PM.

  2. #12
    Super Member flusher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    7,067
    Location
    Sacramento
    Tractor
    Getting old. Sold the ranch. Sold the tractors. Moved back to the city.

    Default Re: Making hay without a bailer

    Quote Originally Posted by stuckmotor View Post
    Someone, maybe Bushog, called the removable side a 'hay door'. The theory is, that being knocked around under the deck crushes the crop giving a result similar to a conditioner, and makes it dry faster. In my experience the mower threw the hay out the side before chopping it up too fine.
    I've used a 5' Woods Cadet with a hay door to cut hay and was well satisfied with the job it did in springy, pasture grasses. I wasn't satisfied with the way it cut long stemmed crops like Sudan Grass or Millet because the tractor tires bent and broke the stems and the mower would't pick them back up, or cut them, causing me to lose hay.

    Bush Hog made models 305 and 306 hogs that have a removable door on the left side of the mower for haying. There also was a windrowing attachment that mounted on the left side of the mower.

  3. #13
    Platinum Member 3v0's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    520
    Location
    Oklahoma Pan Handle, United States
    Tractor
    Kubota BX2200

    Default Re: Making hay without a bailer

    Or you can find an old side delivery rake.

  4. #14
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,930
    Location
    Up State S.C.
    Tractor
    AC WD 34 hp/3500 lbs MF 261 60 hp/5380 lbs

    Default Re: Making hay without a bailer

    Quote Originally Posted by flusher View Post
    Bush Hog made models 305 and 306 hogs that have a removable door on the left side of the mower for haying. There also was a windrowing attachment that mounted on the left side of the mower.
    I used to have an advertising brochure that showed one of the windrowing attachments. Have you ever seen one in operation? I haven't and was curious as to how well they worked.

  5. #15
    Super Member flusher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    7,067
    Location
    Sacramento
    Tractor
    Getting old. Sold the ranch. Sold the tractors. Moved back to the city.

    Default Re: Making hay without a bailer

    Quote Originally Posted by stuckmotor View Post
    I used to have an advertising brochure that showed one of the windrowing attachments. Have you ever seen one in operation? I haven't and was curious as to how well they worked.

    Nope, but they're simple to fabricate. I assume that it works as well as a combo rake-tedder for windrowing.

  6. #16
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,930
    Location
    Up State S.C.
    Tractor
    AC WD 34 hp/3500 lbs MF 261 60 hp/5380 lbs

    Default Re: Making hay without a bailer

    Quote Originally Posted by flusher View Post
    Nope, but they're simple to fabricate. I assume that it works as well as a combo rake-tedder for windrowing.
    Do combo rake-tedders use a board of some kind to catch the hay, similar to the hay door on tubing?

  7. #17
    Super Member flusher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    7,067
    Location
    Sacramento
    Tractor
    Getting old. Sold the ranch. Sold the tractors. Moved back to the city.

    Default Re: Making hay without a bailer

    Quote Originally Posted by stuckmotor View Post
    Do combo rake-tedders use a board of some kind to catch the hay, similar to the hay door on tubing?
    Yep. Google "tedder rake" to see the pictures.
    I don't own one of those things. But from what I read they are just average at doing tedding and raking.

  8. #18
    Platinum Member econometrics's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    689
    Location
    East Texas
    Tractor
    Deere 5075E MFWD OOS w/PR, 540E; Gator 825i

    Default Re: Making hay without a bailer

    Yeah, like others have suggested, I think you would get a better product if you used a sickle. I'm sure you can find a 3PT sickle used somewhere. Then just haysweep that stuff up!

  9. #19
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    633
    Location
    SW OH - near Dayton, OH
    Tractor
    1978 Kubota L285, 1951 Farmall h, 1946 Farmall m, 1950 John Deere A, 1953 Ford NAA Golden Jubilee, 195? Ford 850, 1948 Case DC

    Default Re: Making hay without a bailer

    Quote Originally Posted by tucker2 View Post
    No, I was told bush hog made models where one side was removable, this was for cutting hay. I plan to cut out one side of a old cutter I have.
    To the OP, Many of bales of hay have been cut with an old bush hog with either one side of it removed or sometimes simply with the back end raised slightly higher than the front. Really whatever it takes to get it to discharge most of the hay out cleanly without shredding it up. The great thing about using a bush hog is there is little to no maintenance to it. Also, it will "poor man" condition the hay to help it dry a bit quicker as compared to a plain ole sickle mower (which is a high maintenance cutter). All these claims that the hay will be inferior is total hogwash and take this from a guy who hayed for several years using a plain ole square back bush hog as his cutter. While I might agree with the claims of inferior hay using a bush hog in a pristine field of alfalfa as there would be some leaf loss, but frankly what idiot is going to cut a pristine field of expensive alfalfa hay with a bush hog? Frankly, if all you have is tough, stemmy, less than desirable grasses then I would argue that the bush hog will actually make a better quality hay by tenderizing those tough grasses a bit and make them more palatable to your goats or cows. (i.e. think along the lines of how humans tenderize a low quality round steak to make it more tender and appetizing). When I used a bush hog as my cutter, the animals ate every bit of that hay with almost zero waste.

    There are only 2 Disadvantages to using a bush hog cutter in my opinion : First, you will suffer some yield loss expect 30% or so over using a true dedicated hay cutter. What I mean by that is that if your hay is yielding 1000 lbs per acre you will only get 700 lbs per acre using a bush hog. If your haying for money that yield loss can be significant, but for a guy planning to do what you are doing then it should not really matter. Even if baling for money you need to insure that the yield loss if you were able to gain it back pays for the added expense of using the more expensive dedicated hay cutter (easy to justify in high dollar hay, not so much in low dollar cheap hay). The second disadvantage to using the bush hog is that in a really tall stand of grass the tractor travel speed can be pretty slow. No big deal on slow travel speeds long as you have the time and a big enough weather drying window to get everything done.

    I would recommend that you do plan on picking up an old inexpensive hay rake. I am talking something real cheap like a $100 John Deere 594 on steel wheels (I use a rake like this). You can use that rake for making windrows and then flippying the windrows for better drying properties. These rakes are very durable, can be bought cheap (basically scrap iron price), and do an excellent job of raking hay. It will make your job a whole bunch easier.

    Loose hay was put up for centuries in barn lofts. Hay quality in a barn loft would be the same as if it were in a square bale - albeit harder to handle.

    Loose hay has also been put up for centuries outside in a proper water shedding shock. As long as a proper shock is made so the shock sheds water and the hay does not mold then you are good to go...
    Last edited by rankrank1; 04-20-2013 at 01:00 PM.

  10. #20
    Platinum Member 3v0's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    520
    Location
    Oklahoma Pan Handle, United States
    Tractor
    Kubota BX2200

    Default Re: Making hay without a bailer

    John Deere 594
    aka side delivery rake

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. New Holland Hay bailer s68
    By iamtheman in forum Ag Tractors & Machinery
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-25-2011, 05:10 PM
  2. How wide driveway for hay bailer
    By Bob Vanderlinde in forum Projects
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-25-2011, 06:46 AM
  3. Hay Bailer for new TC
    By Tanberry in forum New Holland Owning/Operating
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 04-22-2006, 06:03 AM
  4. Value of old hayliner hay bailer?
    By tillboy2001 in forum New Holland Buying/Pricing
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12-27-2005, 06:06 PM
  5. hay making
    By barticus73 in forum Owning/Operating
    Replies: 73
    Last Post: 06-13-2003, 02:01 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2016 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.