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  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    31
    Location
    Northern Wisconsin
    Tractor
    Kubota B 2910

    Default hyd. operating temperature

    Does anyone that uses a remote hyd. valve notice how warm it gets? This summer I added a Tatro grapple to my B2910. I used a Prince open center valve rated at 25 gpm. I believe I plumbed it correctly, I ran a hose from the loader valve's PB port to the remote valve's IN side. Then a hose from the valve's OUT back to the tractor where the PB had originally been connected. The whole system works fine, but after working it for ,say, an hour on a hot day, the remote gets so warm you can't touch it for more than 10 -15 seconds. The loader valve gets warm too but not to the point where you can't hang on to it. Is this normal? I don't know how hot hydraulic oil is supposed to operate. The oil level is up to the top mark on the stick, and both filters and the hyd. system oil were changed at the 300 hr. mark which was about 25 hrs. ago. Any thoughts? I fear I may be cooking the HST pump.
    Thanks, Mike

  2. #2
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    721
    Location
    Columbus, Georgia
    Tractor
    Kuborta B2400, L2900, L4330; Caterpillar D3B, John Deere 455D

    Default Re: hyd. operating temperature

    Mike:

    I don't think you have a problem. Most pump and motor specifications assume the oil will reach at least 185 deg F (70deg F) and therefore the viscosity recommended is high enough that the moving parts are adequately lubricated at that temperature.

    Water just out of a hot water heater may be 140 deg F, and if you soak a piece of metal in it you (at least I) will have great difficulty holding it tightly in your hand for more than a few seconds. So your oil is probably under 140 deg F. The FEL valve probably feels cooler because its greater surface dissipates heat more rapidly than does the auxiliary valve. And is is probably bolted fairly tightly to a metal plate that serves as a good heat sink.

  3. #3
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
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    Mar 2000
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    39,487
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    Texas

    Default Re: hyd. operating temperature

    Mike, a sorta rule of thumb is 100 degrees F above the ambient temperature. So you can expect things to get too hot to touch. After I added the top 'n tilt to my B2710 and noticed how hot that valve got, I did some testing of my own with a probe into the hydraulic oil and had to agree with what I'd read about 100 over ambient.
    Bird

  4. #4
    Epic Contributor
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    jinman's Avatar
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    Feb 2001
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    21,014
    Location
    Texas - Wise County - Sunset
    Tractor
    NHTC45D, NH LB75B, Ford Jubilee

    Default Re: hyd. operating temperature

    Hydraulic oil can stand temperatures above 220 F, but the oil will deteriorate rapidly as it goes over 250 F. Your oil is probably heated much more by the HST transmission than the operation of the remote. Just think, the water in your radiator is probably 180-200 F and the engine oil is even slightly higher. Any of these temperatures would be way too high for anything more than momentary skin contact.
    Jim


  5. #5
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    113
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Tractor
    Kubota BX2350

    Default Re: hyd. operating temperature

    A lot of new construction and compact construction vehicles (BHL's, SSL's, etc...) can hit 240F as intermittant for max ambient conditions (desert).

    Only takes a few seconds to get a very nasty burn at those temps.


    IowaAndy

  6. #6
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    2,352
    Location
    Wayne County Pa.
    Tractor
    Massey Ferguson model 85, Allis-Chalmers WD-45

    Default Re: hyd. operating temperature

    Oils can hit those temps no problem. But what about the other components? Under high pressure, your seals that are rated for 212 degrees will begin to deform and extrude. If they don't extrude, they become brittle when they cool.

    Anyway Mike, you have nothing to worry about. Everything is normal.
    Knowing is not enough, you must apply.
    Willing is not enough, you must do.
    Bruce Lee

  7. #7
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Posts
    6,595

    Default Re: hyd. operating temperature

    I have some old specs on my ford industrial that show cycle times with fluid at 160F, which is normal operating temperature.

    You NEED to get up to that temp or a bit higher to get the moisture out or you will have issues.

    jb

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    31
    Location
    Northern Wisconsin
    Tractor
    Kubota B 2910

    Default Re: hyd. operating temperature

    Thanks to all who replied. As always, this form is a wealth of experience
    JB, I've noticed you always stress the importance of running a machine long and hard enough to dissipate condensation. As a result, in cooler weather, I save up smaller tractor chores so I can do this. Thanks, Mike

  9. #9
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    2,352
    Location
    Wayne County Pa.
    Tractor
    Massey Ferguson model 85, Allis-Chalmers WD-45

    Default Re: hyd. operating temperature

    A little isopropyl will do the same thing. Running your equipment up to temperature is a good thing, but if you can't run it hard for a long time, adding a little isopropyl will help.
    Knowing is not enough, you must apply.
    Willing is not enough, you must do.
    Bruce Lee

  10. #10
    Super Star Member J_J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
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    18,922
    Location
    JACKSONVILLE, FL
    Tractor
    Power-Trac 1445, KUBOTA B-9200HST

    Default Re: hyd. operating temperature

    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne County Hose View Post
    A little isopropyl will do the same thing. Running your equipment up to temperature is a good thing, but if you can't run it hard for a long time, adding a little isopropyl will help.
    Most people will not know that they have water in their system until they check the fluid, or notice diminished operation.

    Are you saying to add isopropyl to hydraulic oil? What is the purpose of this? I am guessing it is to remove or absorb the water, but what then. You have now changed the chemistry of the hydraulic fluid. Most hydraulic oils have some kind of detergent in them, and therefore will emulsify the water in with the oil, and I don't think there is enough heat to vaporize the water. What you will have is a milky looking oil that will need changing real quick.

    I haven't tried it, but I don't think you can cook the water out of emulsified oil.

    I have read in hydraulic literature that non-detergent oil is better, because the water is heavier, and will go to the bottom of the tank, which can be drained off before causing any trouble.

    Even is non-detergent oils, if the pump can pick up the water and mix it under pressure, It is still bad hydraulic fluid.
    J.J.

    When I works, I works hard. When I sits and thinks, I goes to sleep.

    Git er done.

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