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  1. #1
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    Default RO Hydraulic oil

    does this work in a FEL. the manual states ATF. but the backhoe and FEL both list different oils.
    thanks steve

  2. #2
    Elite Member DieselPower's Avatar
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    JD 3020, JD 4230, JD 7410, JD 2440, MF 750, NH LS170

    Default Re: RO Hydraulic oil

    What kind of equipment? R&O hydraulic oil is just a oil with a rust and anti-oxidation additive package. Is the oil used for a hydrostatic transmission? Is it a common sump system?

  3. #3
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    Default Re: RO Hydraulic oil

    a backhoe/FEL system

    steve

  4. #4
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    Massey Ferguson model 85, Allis-Chalmers WD-45

    Default Re: RO Hydraulic oil

    In hydraulic systems, ATF is commonly used as a low temp fluid. I can't see anything that ATF would do in your hydraulic system that straight hydraulic wouldn't, other than low temp usage. I use ATF in my log splitter because I frequently split wood in cold temps. Most forklift manufacturers recommend ATF for use in freezer applications, AW 32 for standard applications.
    Maybe DP can confirm this, but I have been told by my oil rep that R&O oil doesn't last as long as straight hyd oil because of the R&O additives.
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  5. #5
    J_J
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    Default Re: RO Hydraulic oil

    DieselPower,
    Wayne County Hose , or anybody that is up on oils for hydraulics.

    What would you guys think about the use of motor oil as hydraulic fluid? I hear so much about this oil and that oil, that it leaves one in doubt about what is what. Lubricant is lubricant, but with additives to do a certain function. For instance, the Power-Trac is all hydraulic machine using 10W-30 or 40 motor oil as the hydraulic fluid of choice, with some saying that is because you can find that grade of oil just about anywhere. It appears to be doing an outstanding job as far as I know. Not that it is just Power-Trac is using it , some larger industrial machines are using motor oils as the hydraulic oil. My Case manual says to use 10W-30, but to add Case special additive, which probably improves certain characteristics. Some of this stuff is so confusing and some of the people you talk to are also confused as well. I ask the question to a hydraulic tech one time, is there any advantage or disadvantage to using motor oil in a hydraulic system? and he said why would they do that. When you hear things like that, you have to wonder, just who the he** is right. I believe some of the PT guys have switched over to synthetic motor oils and said it was better for the conditions that they switched. Maybe it was for cold weather operation. I don't know for sure, but the motor oil used in my PT-1445 may be some of the original oil put in, in the early 90's. It still looks clean. I have had several blow outs on hoses, and refilled the tank. It holds 20 gal.

    Just curious what other people think.
    J.J.

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  6. #6
    Elite Member DieselPower's Avatar
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    Default Re: RO Hydraulic oil

    J J - There are some down sides to using engine oil. Probably the biggest one in my opinion is that some of the additives used in engine oil make it more prone to holding water in solution increasing the possibility of of component damage. One of the big advantages to using engine oil is it's availability and the simple fact that you need to stock fewer lubricants. Manufacturers that have systems designed for using higher viscosity oils probably pick engine oil due to it's availability. Standard ISO 32 hydraulic oil is easy to find most anywhere but finding a ISO 100 or 150 in the store is next to near impossible. They would be special order items and no one wants to wait for a order to arrive when they need to fill their hydraulic sump, especially when there are fields waiting to be farmed.

    One of the additives used in AW hydraulic oil and UTF type lubricants is zinc. Engine oils have had some rather drastic changes over the last 10 or so years in the amount of zinc that is allowed in them due to emissions systems. There is no such limit on hydraulic oils because they are not used in a internal combustion engine. I have never gotten any of the Case additive and had a analysis done on it but i suspect it has a healthy dose of zinc and probably a anti-foam booster package.

    Like Wayne said, using ATF is pretty common especially in colder climates. Again, it's easy to find at any store. Finding cold climate hydraulic oil is a little harder. The good thing about using ATF is that it is a hydraulic oil, automatic transmissions are nothing more than complicated hydraulic pumps with gears.

    Wayne - The main reason R&O hydraulic oil doesn't last as long as AW hydraulic oil is usually due to the AW hydraulic oil having the AW additive package. R&O hydraulic oils have their place but it's usually left to the industrial industry and machinery that is found in climate controlled environments and under a continuous steady load. AW hydraulic oils tend to be used in outside applications (tractors/excavation type equipment) where temperature variations, atmospheric conditions and load can vary drastically.

    Is your equipment going to blow up because you use engine oil for the hydraulic system, no. It will probably live a long and happy life but using a properly formulated hydraulic fluid of the correct viscosity would probably increase it's life span. The increase in anti-wear additives alone can often decrease maximum operating temps considerably and heat is is one of the top killer's of hydraulic system components along with fluid contamination.

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