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  1. #1
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    Kioti DK40SE HST

    Default Questions: gas powered log splitter hydraulics

    I have been in the market for a log splitter, have narrowed the selection to 3. I have only done online research so far, and am planning to start going out and looking @ the machines next week. I need to understand some stuff about the hydraulics, tho, before I get to the stores, so I can ask intelligent questions.

    This is where you folks come in . . . .

    The advertised splitting force of the candidates ranges from 27 to 30 tons.

    Only 1 of the candidates specifically says that it contains a filter for the hydraulic fluid.

    Is a filter necessary? It's a closed system and I don't understand what the filter would be filtering exactly. What's going to get into the hydraulic fluid?

    And if a filter is necessary, can I add an after market filter in-line somewhere? Without effecting the performance of the machine? And, if so, where to add filter?

    The advertised tonnage/hydraulic volume for these machines is:
    27 tons/3 gals, 27 tons/6.5 gals, 30 tons/8.5 gals.

    Why such a wide discrepancy in hydraulic fluid volume? What is gained/lost by increasing/decreasing volume? Is this to dissipate heat?

    One of the machines has a "hydraulic fluid type" recommendation of "10wt AW32, ASLE H-150, or ISO32". Huh?

    What would be the hydraulic fluid that I should run to ensure maximum longevity for this device? Is it wrong to assume that all of these machines should be using pretty much the same weight (?) of hydraulic fluid?

    How long between hydraulic fluid changes? Should this be based on hours of usage, as in a tractor? How many hours? Or will starting each spring w/fresh oil suffice? I can't imagine me doing more than about 5 cords per season.

    As always, your input and advice is sincerely appreciated.

    Keith

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Questions: gas powered log splitter hydraulics

    Quote Originally Posted by atlkep1 View Post
    I have been in the market for a log splitter, have narrowed the selection to 3. I have only done online research so far, and am planning to start going out and looking @ the machines next week. I need to understand some stuff about the hydraulics, tho, before I get to the stores, so I can ask intelligent questions.

    This is where you folks come in . . . .

    The advertised splitting force of the candidates ranges from 27 to 30 tons.

    Only 1 of the candidates specifically says that it contains a filter for the hydraulic fluid.

    Is a filter necessary? It's a closed system and I don't understand what the filter would be filtering exactly. What's going to get into the hydraulic fluid?

    IMO, yes it is necessary. It is a closed system, BUT there are wear Items in that system. These wear items will slowly wear out over time and need to have the particals filtered.

    And if a filter is necessary, can I add an after market filter in-line somewhere? Without effecting the performance of the machine? And, if so, where to add filter? Yes an aftermarket one will work. Filters are usually on the return line, but sometimes can be on the suction line as well. NEVER on the high pressure like.

    The advertised tonnage/hydraulic volume for these machines is:
    27 tons/3 gals, 27 tons/6.5 gals, 30 tons/8.5 gals.

    Why such a wide discrepancy in hydraulic fluid volume? What is gained/lost by increasing/decreasing volume? Is this to dissipate heat? Heat dissipation is the main reason. HOT oil doesnt lubricate as well. I'd personally stay away form the 3 gallon model. The other two are about right for volume

    One of the machines has a "hydraulic fluid type" recommendation of "10wt AW32, ASLE H-150, or ISO32". Huh? Those specs/numbers are kinda like the hydro oil equivillent of 5w30, 10w30, 30w, etc. Just different viscosities. Just run a viscosity the mfg reccomends.

    What would be the hydraulic fluid that I should run to ensure maximum longevity for this device? Is it wrong to assume that all of these machines should be using pretty much the same weight (?) of hydraulic fluid? Yes they should all be running roughly the same weight. Since the components are usually the same. (barns pump and prince valve, etc). If they give you a range of viscosities, look at when you will be splitting the wood. If you only use it when it is warm out, use oil at the thicker end of the spec. And vice versa if it is cold out when you always split.

    How long between hydraulic fluid changes? Should this be based on hours of usage, as in a tractor? How many hours? Or will starting each spring w/fresh oil suffice? I can't imagine me doing more than about 5 cords per season.

    Follow the manual. Especially if it comes with a warrenty. But it is a good Idea to change it at least once a season. Because even though it is a "closed" system, it still has a vent. Which will allow moisture and condensation in.
    As always, your input and advice is sincerely appreciated.

    Keith
    And take the tonnage ratings with a grain of salt. Two main things to look at are pump GPM and cylinder diameter.

    Pump GPM will determine speed. Cylinder diameter will determine tonnage. A 4.5" cylinder has more force (if equal pressure) than a 4". But the 4" will be faster if the same pump is used.

    The 27-30T range you are looking at probabally have the 4.5" cylinders and 16GPM pump. That is a pretty good combination. If any of them are using the 11gpm, it is going to be slower. And if that 30T model only has a 4.5" cylinder like the 27T models, dont buy it thinking it is going to have more force, because it isnt. Its just marketing.
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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Questions: gas powered log splitter hydraulics

    Quote Originally Posted by atlkep1 View Post

    The advertised splitting force of the candidates ranges from 27 to 30 tons.
    Splitting force is over rated on almost every splitter on the market.
    Tonnage is calculated from max possible pressure relief valve, PRV, setting and cylinder bore diameter (cross area).

    Is a filter necessary?
    yes

    It's a closed system and I don't understand what the filter would be filtering exactly.
    particles from wear in the system....especially imporrtant on a new system...
    Air is vented in and out of the reservoir, and need a breather filter too, to protect dust from entering the reservoir...condens water will still enter the tank....tank need a drain plug in a bottom corner to drain accumulated condens water...
    Make sure there is a fill cap strainer.....no suction strainer/filter needed....

    What's going to get into the hydraulic fluid?
    se above

    And if a filter is necessary, can I add an after market filter in-line somewhere?
    yes

    Without effecting the performance of the machine?
    yes

    And, if so, where to add filter?
    On the return line between control valve and reservoir...

    The advertised tonnage/hydraulic volume for these machines is:
    27 tons/3 gals, 27 tons/6.5 gals, 30 tons/8.5 gals.

    Why such a wide discrepancy in hydraulic fluid volume?
    Larger tonnage splitters have larger pumps (gpm)....to make sure oil can de-aerate and dissipate heat, it is recommended to let oil rest in reservoir 30-60 sec's, which means it is recommended to use a 5-10 gallon reservoir for a 10gpm pump...personally I think it it possible to get by with smaller reservoirs......it all depends on cycle frequency and system design....under sized lines, fittings and control valves causes more heat (wasted energy)..

    What is gained/lost by increasing/decreasing volume?
    see above

    Is this to dissipate heat?
    yes
    , see above


    One of the machines has a "hydraulic fluid type" recommendation of "10wt AW32, ASLE H-150, or ISO32". Huh?:confused2
    :
    any 32 weight hydraulic fluid is what I would recommend, if ambient temperature is 0-80F....recommended operating oil temperatur in the reservoir is 100-140F

    What would be the hydraulic fluid that I should run to ensure maximum longevity for this device?
    See above


    Is it wrong to assume that all of these machines should be using pretty much the same weight (?) of hydraulic fluid
    ?
    no

    How long between hydraulic fluid changes?
    no changes needed if you monitor oil condition stautus frequently and make sure oil is not milky (water) , and keeps it original color (black-ening would indicate overheating)....use of fill cap strainer and return filter is a basic condition though...

    Should this be based on hours of usage, as in a tractor?
    see above

    How many hours?
    n/a


    Or will starting each spring w/fresh oil suffice?
    see above about condense water...if you annual use of the splitter is just a months and the rest is storage, store splitter with fully retracted cylinder and reservoir filled to 95%, covered under roof or better indoors, dry at consistent temperature...

    I can't imagine me doing more than about 5 cords per season.
    Thought about the rental option?? got one with in your daily commute route?? Buying a splitter for 1500$ will be the same as renting for 50$ per day over 10 years....if you are organized, you easy split 5 cords in 2-3 days...and no head ace....no maintenance...no worries....no neighbors or family that knocks on your door for a "free borrow"...

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Questions: gas powered log splitter hydraulics

    Thanx for the splitter hydraulics lessons guys!!

    I printed this thread off and will "study up" before going in to talk.

    AKKAMAN, I have been borrowing a splitter myself, but I'm down to got land to clear and want to do it at my pace and want the splitter available when I feel like working. I'm 25 miles from civilization and I try to avoid visiting there as much as possible. I thought about just renting, but, I admit, I didn't think about it for very long, or even explore the actual costs. Just happen to have a little extra money (for a change) and figured this would be a good time to get setup for the work that's to be done. I'm hoping that if I buy right the first time that maintenance will be minimal and limited to a yearly schedule.

    Thanx for answering my questions.

    K

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Questions: gas powered log splitter hydraulics

    Quote Originally Posted by atlkep1 View Post
    Thanx for the splitter hydraulics lessons guys!!

    I printed this thread off and will "study up" before going in to talk.

    AKKAMAN, I have been borrowing a splitter myself, but I'm down to got land to clear and want to do it at my pace and want the splitter available when I feel like working. I'm 25 miles from civilization and I try to avoid visiting there as much as possible. I thought about just renting, but, I admit, I didn't think about it for very long, or even explore the actual costs. Just happen to have a little extra money (for a change) and figured this would be a good time to get setup for the work that's to be done. I'm hoping that if I buy right the first time that maintenance will be minimal and limited to a yearly schedule.

    Thanx for answering my questions.
    I kinda figured that was your case...LOL...good luck

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    Default

    I have repaired loads of splitters for customers. Want to avoid problems? Do not run one without a return filter. Change the fluid and filter yearly no matter how much you use it. Use it for a firewood splitter and nothing else. Rods bend when you run high pressure with the rod extended. This also side loads the gland and seals which will ruin them. Hope this helps.
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