Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 14 of 14
  1. #11
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    359
    Location
    West Kootenays, British Columbia
    Tractor
    Yanmar YM240D / Massey Ferguson 135 / New Holland TN75F / Pasquali 988 and 997 / Goldoni 20A and 226 / Ferrari 76 and 85 / Holder A50 / Valpadana VMC 180 / Long 610 4WD

    Default Re: Clutch does not disengage

    Was away on business for a few days, but from what you have said, I would say your clutch plate is frozen or rusted to your flywheel. This is a common problem and as mentioned, many tractors have a small hook on the side plate and a pin on the clutch pedal to hook it out of contact when the tractor is stored. People have mixed feelings about locking the clutch back, but it makes sense during storage if you don't have access to a dry area.

    Clutch disks are composites and many types have characteristics that are prone to sticking when left engaged (parked) for a while. Not all tractors are problematic, in fact, I have started tractors that were parked for 10 years without problems and others will stick after a short period of damp weather. It's due to the composites used in the clutch plate, not the tractor itself.

    We always ensure the tractor is not stuck or frozen to the ground. This is not to be taken lightly - a frozen tractor can power over if given enough fuel in low gear: the solution for those parking outside is to always back up first to ensure the rear wheels are not frozen to the ground. When frozen and moving in reverse, it either breaks free or kills the motor by forcing the tractor down on the front wheels. Because tractors have the advantage of gear reduction final drives, starting a tractor frozen to the ground in 1st gear can simply lift the front end and power the entire tractor over. Take it from someone who has experienced this, you will not have the presence of mind to push in the clutch and stop it. In my case, the tractor broke free when the front axle was about eye level. It was not a pleasant landing for either the tractor or myself.

    If you have the space, don't try and shift a tractor without the clutch, there is too much possibility of damage. (No syncro means no mercy for the transmission). If your tractor is in good shape and starts easily, you are better off (if and when possible) to simply start it in low gear (it won't hurt it) and drive off at low speed. Be ready to kill the engine if you need to stop and just drive around with the clutch pushed in until it lets go. Because in has been a relatively short period, this should not take much. If it is icey out, wait until the roads are clean and you have good traction.

    By the way, you would be well off to drain your transmission fluid and either filter it or replace the oil to get rid of your grindings. Grinding gears leaves a fair bit of metal floating around in there and isn't good for bearings or the fine finish of everything else.

  2. #12
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: Clutch does not disengage

    Thx for the advice. I am waiting for it to get a bit warmer before I go outside and try to brake it loose. It has been cold for a few weeks here in the Denver area. Lots of snow in the mountains gives me better things to do than play tractor.
    Think skiiing
    Bob

  3. #13
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    1,070
    Location
    Western Washington
    Tractor
    5300 JD 4X4

    Default Re: Clutch does not disengage

    This is something I have had to deal with on a jeep and a small dozer. What I did with the dozer is start it in gear with the steering clutches disengaged and put the main clutch in. By letting out the steering clutches and putting pressure to the main clutch it would pop free while holding the clutch pedal down.
    with the jeep, had to have it in gear with a rolling start while holding the clutch down. By juicing the engine it will sometimes break the clutch free.
    I don't recommend using these practices unless you are familiar and feel comfortable doing it, but it does work in some cases. Be sure you have lots of room and be ready to take it out of gear if need be. Use the highest gear possible, it takes more torque. Sure beats tearing down the tractor.
    One thing I haven't seen mentioned is the shear pin, or woodruff key on the rocker shaft the the throw out forks ride on. I have seen them give way. Trouble is seeing inside the bellhousing.
    One other way is to jack up the tractor, start it in gear, high gear, and depress the clutch while braking the rears. BE SURE THAT THE TRACTOR IS STABILIZED AND CANNOT MOVE.

  4. #14
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    365
    Location
    Western Maryland
    Tractor
    1982 Bolens/Iseki TS 1910 f (G194)

    Default Re: Clutch does not disengage

    I agree. The new 3005 john deere gear transmission tractor comes with a clip to resolve this issue. For storage??? you push the clutch in and then slip a clip on the clutch arm and this clip holds the clutch open. I bet you get some good service calls for this issue on models without the clip option.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2014 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.