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  1. #1
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    50

    Default Is the JD 4000 series much more stable than the 3000 series?

    I have about 9 acres of pasture I need to mow with a rotary cutter. There is a lot of reed canary grass on the property and clay soil. I know the 4000 series might be a little bigger than what I need, but stability is an important factor to me. I drove a 3203 once and it seemed a little unstable IMO (but again, this was the first time I ever drove a tractor). I also drove a 4103 once, and it seemed very stable. So would the 4103 be a better bet? I know with the 4103 there might be a little more soil compaction on the clay soil during the wetter months, but I figure the wider tires on the 4103 would help with that.

    Is the 3000 series just as safe (when it comes to tipping) as the 4000 series?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Gold Member Cidertom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    472
    Location
    Benton Co Oregon
    Tractor
    JD 4520, 2305 Aktive snow-trac ST4

    Default Re: Is the JD 4000 series much more stable than the 3000 series?

    No, I don't think so. I had a 4300 which is about the size of the 3000 series now. Today I have a 4520. What you gain in stance you lose in height. In other words: While the wider track of the 4000 series appears more stable, the higher center of gravity offsets the track. Both are stable within limits for normal tractor operation. Can you flip one... yep Should you flip one ... nope.

    If you want stability over all else, get the tires as wide as you can. Biggest problem in mowing is hidden humps such as ant hills. Hit them with any speed and you may very well flip a (insert any wheeled tractor here) before you can get it stopped.
    One of americas vanishing breed: Volunteer Firefighter

  3. #3
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    50

    Default Re: Is the JD 4000 series much more stable than the 3000 series?

    Thanks for the explanation. To be fair, when I drove the 3203 I was in a very hilly area, whereas I drove the 4120 series in a very flat area. So obviously that must have been the reason the 4120 seemed more stable. I spoke to a John Deere dealer and they told me there is no difference is stability between the 3000 series and the 4000 series, and both series are very safe. So it's good to know they are equally stable, and neither has a higher chance of flipping.

  4. #4
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    3,179

    Default Re: Is the JD 4000 series much more stable than the 3000 series?

    Yes that is true, however, once you put a cab on the either one, you will start thinking hub extenders and wider tires real quick.
    Nuru
    JD 3520


  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    30
    Location
    Maine

    Default Re: Is the JD 4000 series much more stable than the 3000 series?

    For my two cents, I have asked this same question recently. I own a 3720 and have about 65 acres of rolling land. One of my first experiences was rotary cutting a nearly flat field but one with ruts from previous tractors when the ground was wet. I immediately felt like the tractor could tip when one wheel went in a rut and the other was outside a rut. The tractor has a narrow stance (60" with the wheels as wide as they go) which I thought would be an advantage. I watched a friend nearly tip the tractor the first week backing up a hill and turning the wheels slightly. There are several areas in my land that I cannot begin to tackle. My post brought out several other owners who felt the same way. I know I could load the wheels and put on axle extenders but I don't feel that you should need to do that for routine work. The dealership has let me use a 4320 (about 80" with wheels wide) and I cannot tell you how much more stable it feels. I have used it on the same areas in the same application and the difference is night and day. The tractor doesn't bounce side to side in the ruts nearly as much and I don't feel like at any moment the tractor could topple. I am planning to change from the 3720 to a 4520 for this reason.

    Good luck

  6. #6
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    2,273
    Location
    western NC
    Tractor
    JD 2320; 4520

    Default Re: Is the JD 4000 series much more stable than the 3000 series?

    The 4000 series machines are definitely more stable on hills. They are so much larger, but really not that much taller and with the larger tires, especially when filled, they have quite a low COG. One other thing I like about the 4000 series is they ride better. Because of the extra weight and slightly longer WB they soak up bumps easily and do not "see-saw" quite as much with a bucket load full. The downside, as I have mentioned is that they are not as manuverable. We have had some posts indicating they are as manuverable as the 3000 series machines, but alas, they are not. This is secondary, though, when one is trying to negotiate rough terrain. It is possible to get a 3000 series machine quite close in stability to the 4000 series, but it takes work and lots of low lying ballast to accomplish.

    John M

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