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  1. #1
    Silver Member Dusty1's Avatar
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    Jul 2009
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    100
    Location
    Athens, OH
    Tractor
    John Deere 410 LBH

    Default Older John Deere 410 Question....

    I own a 1974 John deere 410 commercial loader backhoe unit and had a question for all of you who own an older one like me. Mine seems very unstable on uneven ground even when dry, and was wondering if it feels the same on yours.

    As long as I am moving it's usually ok, but when I push the clutch in and get on the brakes and try a bit of manuverability it gets pretty scary. The brakes stop the beast and the guy before me said he just had them done, but it just seems like they are underpowered for a machine of this size. Also it seems like it gets stuck a lot and I am always using the hoe to get me out (granted I have R4 tires on it though). So is it just my machine or is it everyones?
    Also, do you guys know of any ongoing problems or flaws with this model? For the most part I am very pleased with this machine, it is just when on hills it feels like it always wants to flip or just get stuck.

    Thanks for your input!
    -Dusty

  2. #2
    Silver Member Barely Smokin''s Avatar
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    Mar 2009
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    103
    Location
    Nelson County, VA
    Tractor
    1952 JD 440 backhoe, JD 790

    Default Re: Older John Deere 410 Question....

    Hmmmm.....

    Let's take the first leap of faith here and assume the JD didn't design it this way. I can't say for sure re: this model, but it's pretty close to mine. Mine is fine.

    I'd think long and hard about what the PO did to the brakes and why. Did he say anything about them being well and truly fixed? Or just that he worked on them for a while (i.e. "had them done") but never conclusively resolved the problem he, in fact, was having? In other words, why did he feel there was a problem with the brakes to begin with?

    These older models can get a little loosey-goosey but it seems like your symptoms are extreme. Any chance you're just a little uncomfortable while you're learning a new machine?

    Or, how about getting a friend and checking the operation of both brakes---independently---with the rear end lifted off the ground. Maybe one of your brakes is working better (misadjusted? glazed? bent linkage?) than the other and pitching the machine to one side. How about experimenting with tire pressure?
    JD 790 w/FEL, Frontier 1060 FM, BB, SP, RB, PHD, forks and log splitter

    JD 440 rubber tire FEL and BH

    Caterpillar D4D

  3. #3
    Silver Member Dusty1's Avatar
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    Jul 2009
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    Location
    Athens, OH
    Tractor
    John Deere 410 LBH

    Default Re: Older John Deere 410 Question....

    The machine just dosen't stop on a dime if you know what I mean, and was just curious if that was a simptom of such a heavy piece of equipment. I know ag tires would work wonders to help, but don't have a desire to distroy my lawn. So you have a similar size commercial machine (with a hoe with a reach of around 15') and it preforms better on uneven surfaces, or it is a standard tractor?
    Yeah, I guessed the guys I got this from skimped on a couple of things considering the cost, but I guess I'll just have to go through it again.
    One more question for you, this tractor has a lever-style reverser, and was wondering if it will cause any problems to swich from forward into reverse without using the clutch?

    Thanks!

  4. #4
    Platinum Member BarryinMN's Avatar
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    Feb 2003
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    860
    Location
    Minnesota
    Tractor
    JD, Allis-Chalmers, Zetor

    Default Re: Older John Deere 410 Question....

    I have an older AC 1970. They are tippy, low to the ground - extra attention loading on a trailer, etc. I just live with the lightweight nose but I suppose adding a boulder or 2 would aid steering. I plowed snow with it one year worked great until the brakes got hot steering .

    A brake job on mine entails splitting the tractor - think repair costs exceed the value of the machine. I've been told even when new the brakes on these horses were not very strong.

    If your power reverser is like mine the clutch pedal is just another hydraulic valve not necessary for fwd reverse.
    Veneer Tree Farmer

  5. #5
    Silver Member Dusty1's Avatar
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    Jul 2009
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    Location
    Athens, OH
    Tractor
    John Deere 410 LBH

    Default Re: Older John Deere 410 Question....

    Thanks Barry, that is very helpful. Also, how much pressure do you keep in your tires?

    -Dusty

  6. #6
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
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    939
    Location
    Maryland

    Default Re: Older John Deere 410 Question....

    You say ag tires would help stop you. Is it because the tires slide when you try to stop or will the tires not slide? Brakes on these are typically very strong. You should be able to make the wheels slide. Do both left and right brakes feel strong? Are the pedals firm or are they spongy? Pedal should not travel over 2 inches before getting firm. Maybe the lines have air in them and needs to be bled out.

  7. #7
    Platinum Member BarryinMN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    860
    Location
    Minnesota
    Tractor
    JD, Allis-Chalmers, Zetor

    Default Re: Older John Deere 410 Question....

    For air pressure I usually run 50-60 psi near the max in front. Rears 10-14 I look at the dust on the tread on concrete & try for full coverage.

    As far as getting stuck here are some tips:
    1. Dont spin the tires when digging!
    2 See #1
    3. If all else fails I reach around and extend out the backhoe. This changes the balance just enough to pull back out keeping the bucket full. Sometimes adding raising the bucket 5-6' gets me out but the CG shifts really high - last resort.

    If a bucket load sinks the front up to it's 2wd axle in mud - it's time to do something else till it dries out.
    Veneer Tree Farmer

  8. #8
    Silver Member Dusty1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    100
    Location
    Athens, OH
    Tractor
    John Deere 410 LBH

    Default Re: Older John Deere 410 Question....

    Yes the tires slide on hills when braking which adds to instability, I have to push on them pretty hard to do so though. I'll check about both sides of the tractor to test the tires, but I was unaware that they were set up like standard car brakes. I came across the bleeder valves for the rear a while ago, but they where in the axle, not with a separate line and no brake resivuar (spelling?). If so how does air get in there without leaking some fluid? Please explain.

  9. #9
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    9,146
    Location
    somewhere usa
    Tractor
    Deere 110tlb, 4520, x749, L130

    Default Re: Older John Deere 410 Question....

    Since this is an older unit I have to ask what % of tread is remaining on the tires? Also R4 tires are the standard for this equipment and seem to work well in most cases. And yes the older 4x2 backhoes are more cumbersome on side hills than the newer 4x4 units available today but can still get the job done. Just be careful on the slopes and use the outriggers to your advantage.


    Steve

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