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  1. #1
    Veteran Member deepNdirt's Avatar
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    yanmar YM-1700

    Default Question about a design

    Hi all You JD owners, can anyone explain to me the reason being of such a goofy looking design of a tractor? I mean I've seen a Lot of weired looking tractors and most are self explanatory, when seeing them jacked way up for crop rows etc,etc,. but I cannot figure this one out?
    it's a '41 JD-L
    Last edited by deepNdirt; 11-23-2010 at 08:00 PM.
    Never judge a man until you've walked a day in his shoes,

  2. #2
    Super Star Member RoyJackson's Avatar
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    Bethel, Vermont
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    John Deere 4400 MFWD, Deere 855D UTV, Z920A Zero Turn Mower and assorted implements

    Default Re: Question about a design

    Quote Originally Posted by deepNdirt View Post
    Hi all You JD owners, can anyone explain to me the reason being of such a goofy looking design of a tractor? I mean I've seen a Lot of weired looking tractors and most are self explanatory, when seeing them jacked way up for crop rows etc,etc,. but I cannot figure this one out?
    it's a '41 JD-L
    I'm going to take a guess...two guesses, actually...
    First, the L was a lower priced tractor and used less steel in it's manufacture.
    The second guess is this tractor was built during the WW II era and steel was prioritized to the war effort. This design definitely used less steel.

    Maybe one of the old iron aficionados will step up and educate us all.
    Roy Jackson

    "Any government that does not trust its citizens with firearms is either a tyranny, or planning to become one."
    -Joseph P. Martino

  3. #3
    Silver Member LRTX1's Avatar
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    Hague, Fl
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    Farmall 140's

    Default Re: Question about a design

    My guess, the "L" has the culitvators up front and without all that sheet steel it would make it easier to see when cultivating.

    Also remember at the time these "L"s came out most farmers were still using horse/mule. I am sure the simple open design made it easier for that transition from mule to tractor.

    My grandfather gave up on mule farming in the early 40's and bought an "L". He sold his mule and bought an "L". A few months later that mule returned home only to get sold again. Once again it happened. He always joke about that "one mule" paid for that little "L"
    Layne

  4. #4
    Super Member AKfish's Avatar
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    Kasilof, Alaska
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    JD 5075M; JD 110 TLB; JD 4720; Ford 9N; JD X300R

    Default Re: Question about a design

    Quote Originally Posted by LRTX1 View Post
    My guess, the "L" has the culitvators up front and without all that sheet steel it would make it easier to see when cultivating.

    Also remember at the time these "L"s came out most farmers were still using horse/mule. I am sure the simple open design made it easier for that transition from mule to tractor.

    My grandfather gave up on mule farming in the early 40's and bought an "L". He sold his mule and bought an "L". A few months later that mule returned home only to get sold again. Once again it happened. He always joke about that "one mule" paid for that little "L"
    I got a good chuckle outta that story...!

    There were 2 other tractor's of that time that looked very similar as well. Allis Chalmers and International Harvester both came out with machines that were configured with frame mounted cultivators. The low valley between the engine and the seat was were the cultivator was mounted.

    AKfish
    "Most people want to live on top of the mountain, but all the happiness and growth occurs while you're climbing it."

  5. #5
    Platinum Member Henri88's Avatar
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    Northern N.B.
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    2008 JD 2305

    Default Re: Question about a design

    Here is some info I got in a book call ''The John Deere Tractor'' by Randy Leffingwell. I'm just going to quotes bits and pieces on the L model.

    Deer felt there was a need for something even smaller than the model B: a one plow tractor. Willard Nordenson a Deer and Company engineer, was given the challenge to produce a tractor out of existing parts and pieces for large estates, golf courses, and even cemeteries. Nordenson went outsides Deere for a Hercules 2 cylinder engine that he mounted upright. He couple it to a Ford's Model A automobile transmission. The familiar H-shift pattern and foot clutch were selling points to non-agriculture operators who had previous experience with automobiles but none with tractors. To keep the Model L compact in length, the engine and operator were offset on opposite sides of the centerline. The tractor was introduced Unstyled in 1938 and replaced in 1939 with the Styled version. The Hercules engine was replace by Deere's own 2 cylinder. The cost $545.00 in 1941
    Model L : intended to pull one 12'' plow. Deere Engine rated 7hp at the drawbar and 10.4 hp at the belt at 1480rpm.
    Henri

    How could you be told I was french?

    Rotary cutter 4' Howse , mid mount mower 54'' , f.e. loader 200CX , tiller RT1150 Frontier , cultivator PC1001 Frontier , middle buster PM1001 Frontier , JD 47'' front snowblower , pallet forks , 4' boxblade Agriease , grass-sweeper , quick hitch Speeco , trailer hitch , cab Jodale-Perry , trailer 16' galvanized Easy-Hauler ,

  6. #6
    Bronze Member
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    S E Mass.
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    2520

    Default Re: Question about a design

    I think that's a fairly small tractor.
    You can see over the top and to each side of the engine fairly well.


    The 48 series is kinda funny looking, too.
    Funnier yet is someone just 4 feet 11 and 1/2 inches tall driving it.

  7. #7
    Elite Member dex3361's Avatar
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    Kubota L4400-1 HST,FEL, 3x3 remotes, TNT. BX1500 54 mmm

    Default Re: Question about a design

    And we all thought SCUTs were a new thing.
    Randall



    1Timothy Chapter 2:
    3 For this is good and acceptable in the sight of God our Saviour;
    4 Who will have all men to be saved, and to come unto the knowledge of the truth.
    5 For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus.
    From: The HOLY BIBLE

  8. #8
    Veteran Member deepNdirt's Avatar
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    yanmar YM-1700

    Default Re: Question about a design

    I knew you guy's would have a logical explanation for such a design built tractor, I guess building this L series to replace the mule drawn plows was an advance in technology for sure, Even though as funky as it looks it would beat the heck out of looking at the hind end of an ***** all day while plowing
    oops! can I say that when referring to a Mule
    Never judge a man until you've walked a day in his shoes,

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