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  1. #1

    Default 4300 Engine Oil Filter

    Has anyone found a replacement engine oil filter that replaces the John Deere brand? Wix, AC Delco, Purulator, etc? I would assume someone makes the filter for John Deere.

    Thanks,
    Bill Walls


  2. #2
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    960
    Location
    Tescott, Kansas
    Tractor
    Kubota L5740/cab with air ride seat

    Default Re: 4300 Engine Oil Filter

    I have only bought one filter so far, but a JD filter(engine) cost me about $5.50. Is that a problem?


  3. #3

    Default Re: 4300 Engine Oil Filter

    No problem. The local auto parts store or Wal-Mart is just closer than the John Deere dealer.


  4. #4
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Posts
    55
    Location
    Maine
    Tractor
    JD 850

    Default Re: 4300 Engine Oil Filter

    I don't know about John Deere but in some situations a filter that will fit an engine is not necessarily right for it. Several years ago my son bought a Ford from a Chevrolet dealer and shortly after the oil light came on. Had it towed to a garage and the mechanic noticed that it had a brand new AC filter. He changed it and the light went out! He worked in a GM garage and said they had learned it the hard way. For some reason AC oil filters did not work well in Fords. The same thing might be true with the JD. Could it also void the warranty?


  5. #5
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    960
    Location
    Tescott, Kansas
    Tractor
    Kubota L5740/cab with air ride seat

    Default Re: 4300 Engine Oil Filter

    OK, I understand now. My local NAPA auto parts store handles filters for any size and common makes of tractors.


  6. #6

    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    236
    Location
    NC
    Tractor
    JD 4100 HST

    Default Re: 4300 Engine Oil Filter

    NAPA is right proud of their filters too.


  7. #7
    Super Star Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Posts
    10,040
    Location
    Triangle Of North Carolina
    Tractor
    JD 4700

    Default Re: 4300 Engine Oil Filter

    I've seen the discussion before concerning the quality of different brand filters. But I never really was convinced that one brand of filters was any better than another. Part of the quality argument is that some filters have more filter material than others. There is a website somewhere where the guy opened all the filters to look at the quantity of the filter material. The problem with that approach is that it does not detemine how well the filter filters. Its very concieveable that one brand can have less filter material but get the same or better results because the material filters better than another brands. But who knows?

    When I bought my truck in 95, I was away on vacation when I wanted to change the oil and filter after putting some miles on the vehicle. I was at a friends house and I could not get the OEM filter off! The thing was on way to tight. I could have done the screw driver removal method but not in my friends driveway so I took the truck to a Quicky Lube place. Well Quicky Lubes are NOT quick in my experience. As I was waiting the hour for the 10 minute job I started comparing the costs of the oil change vs what the oil, filter, labor, overhead, etc was costing the company. Even with rough estimages and given that the company should pay less for the oil and filters due to volume I could not see how they could be putting in a good filter.

    I drove back to my friends house and drained the new oil with 5 miles on it and replaced the filter with the one I bought. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    Finally I'm getting to my point if I have one. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img] My dealer had a party this Saturday to celebrate his aniversery. They happened to have a table with a bunch of filters that had been opened up including JDs. JDs' oil filter was the most heavier built of the filters. It had more filter material and it was more closely and uniformily packed. Does this means it filters better? I dont' know but I would guess it does. I think the filter for the 4700 was around $6 and the tranny/hyraulic filter was around $20 I think. I just glanced at the receipt. 6$ was not bad but $20+ seems steep. But 20 dollars over hundreds of hours ain't that big of a deal.

    But I'm also picky. I busted a bolt on my backhoe. The bolt holds the pin in place which in turn holds the dipper stick and boom togather. The bolt is 3/8 by 3 inch Grade 5. Not a problem. However its got RR written on the bolt head. I thought that was just the brand id but I was not sure. The part is a special order from JD. The RR bolt is the ONLY RR bolt on the backhoe. I looked at mine and one on the dealer's lot. All the other bolts had different characters or a triangle. I figured for .90 cents I getting the special order bolt. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img] .90 cents is cheap piece of mind. There is a conversation on bolts somewhere on TBN I just have not had time to search for the discussion....

    Hope this rambling helps...... [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]
    Dan McCarty


  8. #8
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    658
    Location
    Central Wisconsin
    Tractor
    1986 Ford 1910 with 770B (FORD) loader, 4 MFWD; 1986 Bolens G214,back hoe,loader,MFWD (Iseki) 21 hp)

    Default Re: 4300 Engine Oil Filter

    http://members.nbci.com/minimopar/oilfilters.html
    Oil filter site refered to in dmccarty post



    RCH

  9. #9

    Default Re: 4300 Engine Oil Filter

    from Baldwin Filters: {a major ag/off-road filter mfr.}
    Baldwin Filters



    Protecting today´s engines
    As modern, high-performance engines have continued to evolve over the past 50 years, so has the requirement for more sophisticated oil filters. While filters play a "passive role in engine protection, they nevertheless must work together with the lubricating oil to keep engines protected and clean.
    Modern oils play vital functions in protecting engines, especially in heavy-duty situations such as trucking, construction, mining and agriculture. Lubricating oil acts to reduce friction and wear, cool engine parts, seal combustion chambers, clean engine components and inhibit corrosion. These functions are carried out by special additives in the oil, which complement the action of the oil itself. The protective action of the lubricating oil and its additives are supported and balanced by the work of the lube filter.

    Lube filters, particularly those designed for heavy-duty applications, have the sole purpose of keeping damaging contaminants away from sensitive engine parts. Filters trap oil contaminants in two ways: Some particles "adhere to filter media as the oil flows through the filter. Such particles attach themselves to the media surface without plugging up the media "pores.

    Other particles are trapped in the filter media by the pressure of the oil as it flows through the filter. As the oil changes direction in its path through the filter, particles are driven or "impinged into the media. Ideally, most of these particles are trapped in the outer portion of the media, leaving inner media surfaces open to continue catching particles that slip through. Eventually, however, media pores will "fill up and the filter begins to lose its´ effectiveness.

    A close-up look at filter media
    As engine power has increased, so have bearing loads, engine rpms and operating temperatures. With the introduction of combination full-flow/ by-pass filters, equipment operators have gained added efficiency in their vehicles performance. However, as newer engines have been designed with improved oil control, oil drain intervals have been increased to account for lower oil usage levels.
    This means that lube filters must be more effective in trapping oil contaminants, and oil drain intervals must be monitored more closely to prevent excessive engine wear. For example, as oil sump capacity decreases, the concentration of fine contaminants in the sump increases. This requires both the oil and the filter to work more effectively to keep particles out of the engine. Filter media today ranges from the long popular and proven cellulose to synthetic media made of fiberglass, polyester, "microglass and various blends of these materials. Each type of media has specific applications for which it is best suited. Cellulose filters are high in efficiency and capacity, yet low in cost. Typically, cellulose filters are rated 98% efficiency at 40 microns. Cellulose media is used in varied oil, air, fuel and some hydraulic applications.

    Microglass filters generally have high efficiency, and media pore size can be controlled to catch small particles. This is especially beneficial for hydraulic oil filtration where 3 to 5 micron filtration is desirable, and hydraulic oil is not warmed by engine heat. The drawback to glass media filters is that the media cannot be "bent too sharply in forming the filter pleats or the glass fibers will be broken. This limits the surface area that can be built into a glass media filter. Also, glass media typically requires a wire screen lining to keep the glass fibers together. Newer filters for heavy-duty use are now being made with a combination of cellulose and synthetic media. This blend of fibers provides improved efficiency, along with increased dirt-holding capacity. Although cost for these filters is greater than regular cellulose filters, the cost can be lower than for microglass. These filters are ideally suited for severe service and extended service intervals.

    Filter Construction is critical to performance
    No matter how efficient the media, lube filters must stand up to tough operating conditions for hundreds of hours or thousands of miles. Over the years, Baldwin has designed and built special machines to perfect filter construction. Innovations include: State-of-the-art high-speed equipment to give filter pleats exceptional uniformity for maximum efficiency in oil flow and contaminant collection.
    Centertube forming equipment to form a spiral seam that is actually stronger than the material itself. This lets the centertube better withstand sudden changes between internal and external pressure.

    Special can/baseplate seaming techniques with double-rolled lock seams to withstand pressure and vibration. Heavy-duty baseplates which are cold-formed to create a solid platform that doesn´t bend or twist under high pressure surges.

    Does extended oil change interval pay?
    Baldwin engineers have been researching extended oil drain intervals in the field for more than 30 years, as have most engine and equipment manufacturers. These engineers agree that extended drain intervals should be approached with extreme caution. While extended intervals may save a few dollars in the short run, improperly managed intervals can lead to accelerated engine wear and costly engine rebuilds. When considering extended drain intervals, it´s important to develop a consistent oil analysis program.
    Another factor to consider is that oil consumption tends to increase toward the end of extended change intervals, because engines burn more used oil than new oil. Increased oil usage reduces the savings from extending the drain interval.

    When evaluating the value of extended change intervals, a key factor for selecting lube filters is capacity—the amount of contaminants the filter can hold before it begins to plug. As oil begins to deteriorate, soot and sludge accumulate in the filter and can rapidly plug the filter media. Lube filters with higher capacity protect the engine better when oil change intervals are extended. Whether your equipment can tolerate extended oil drain intervals depends on such variables as operating environment, engine types, oil used, etc. Consider miles traveled vs. hours of operation. Linehaul trucks averaging 80,000 miles per year may handle extended drain intervals better than local service trucks that travel less than 40,000 miles per year, for example. Remember, too, that the accumulation of oil contaminants builds up over time, regardless of miles traveled or hours operated. Extended oil change intervals don´t lessen the need for effective preventive maintenance, including regular oil analysis. In fact, it amplifies it!

    Baldwin Severe Servie Filters Outperform Synthetic Media Filters
    Responding to today´s demands for effective lube filtration for high performance engines, with the capacity for extending oil change intervals, Baldwin Filters has introduced a new line of "Severe Service filters.
    Severe Service filters incorporate the proven effectiveness of cellulose media, blended with synthetic media technology. Under appropriate conditions, these new filters have extra efficiency and capacity to handle extended drain intervals. On the other hand, for equipment operating under extreme conditions, Severe Service lube filters provide added protection against harmful oil contaminants.




  10. #10

    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    94
    Location
    Western New Hampshire, Conn. River Valley
    Tractor
    John Deere 4100 Hydro, Turf Tires

    Default Re: 4300 Engine Oil Filter

    Gotta get my $.02 worth in...

    The problem with aftermarket filters is simply this - the evaluation that is normally performed to select a filter for a particular application tends to be shortened or neglected for an aftermarket filter. This is generally due to profit motive, sometimes masquerading as lack of personnel or lack of time. When a manufacturer puts their name on a filter, you can be pretty well assured that some engineering type has evaluated that filter for it's appropriateness to that application. With an aftermarket filter, the chances of that rigorous evaluation drop. Of course, it's not always that way - but the smart money bets that way. One certainly can buy after market filters that are every bit as good as the manufacturer's name brand one - but the chances of getting the best one for your tractor still lie with buying the manufacturer's. It's a simple risk/reward decision - I can spend a little more for the manufacturer's, and have a hgh level of confidence that the filter is the most appropriate for the application - OR - I can spend a little less, and take a MUCH large gamble that the filter will be sub-par. Of course, there are lots of people who buy after market filters and have them work fine. But, I'd argue that there are better places to spend your time, money, and efforts than on trying to find out if a particular aftermarket filter is really the best for your application. Few of us have the time, the necessary equipment, or the access to unbiased information that is necessary to objectively determine whether or not a particular filter is truly the best for a particular application.



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