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  1. #1
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    111
    Location
    Sergentsville, NJ (Western NJ, the good part!)
    Tractor
    2003 B7800

    Default Grass Growth and Pucker Factor

    Has anyone ever noticed that the grass grows fastest on the hillsides with the greatest "pucker factor?"

    While mowing today, I was thinking "do I have to mow that hillside again?" Then it dawned on me: the slopes that I wish would not grow at all since I hate mowing them actually grows the fastest.

    I would love to be able to mow these hillsides the "safe way": up and down. However, the fencing in these areas requires me to mow across the hillside and they do have a significant pucker factor, the greatest on the property.

    I think that this is a variation on Murphy's Law: whatever can possibly go wrong, will go wrong.

  2. #2
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    645
    Location
    Fairmont, WV
    Tractor
    2007 Kubota BX24

    Default Re: Grass Growth and Pucker Factor

    Yea, my entire property is a hill. My BX24 does a little slip'n'slinding all the time. And Yes the steepest parts have the thickest and wettest grass.

    I have often thought about building a weight arm to handg off the 3pt and the one bracket for the FEL to act a counter balance. Stiffer sidewall tires in the back would help things too.

    I got the idea from an old John Deere that had willie bars welded to the back of the frame.
    Brian

    2008 2500HD CC SB Duramax 6.6L
    2005 Suzuki Eiger
    2009 Rubicon 4-wheeler
    2011 John Deere 2520, FEL, and 62D belly mower, 6 foot box blade, 6 foot rear blade, a set of pallet forks, a 5 foot brush hog.

  3. #3
    Veteran Member easygo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,402
    Location
    Eddington, Maine
    Tractor
    Kubota B7800

    Default Re: Grass Growth and Pucker Factor

    I make a couple of passes near the house (fence in your case) that is at the top of the hill. That gives me enough room to go up and down and steer onto the fresh track on the already cut area. I hate pucker moments and avoid them at any cost. Even if I have to use the push mower or weed whacker.
    It's the going that counts not the distance!

  4. #4
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    111
    Location
    Sergentsville, NJ (Western NJ, the good part!)
    Tractor
    2003 B7800

    Default Re: Grass Growth and Pucker Factor

    Megaboz: I see your location in WV and can imagine that there is not one level spot on your property. I grew up in Ironton, OH, across the river from Huntington and I worked for Union Carbide and frequently made trips to Charleston, so I know what the landscape is like is WV. Keep all four wheels on the ground!

  5. #5
    Platinum Member RayCo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    983
    Location
    Chester County, PA
    Tractor
    Kubota BX24

    Default Re: Grass Growth and Pucker Factor

    This is part of the reason I mow with a small John Deere lawn tractor. When I'm going sideways on a slope, I can just lean to counterbalance the thing. I need to lose a few pounds, but even with my extra weight, I sure wouldn't be able to do that with the BX!

    The JD probably weighs only 2.5x as much as I do. It's nice when I get it stuck in some mud or have the drive wheel up in the air, and I can just lean my weight to get traction. Can't do that with the BX either, although I can pull myself out of jams with the backhoe.
    Ray
    BX24

  6. #6
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    645
    Location
    Fairmont, WV
    Tractor
    2007 Kubota BX24

    Default Re: Grass Growth and Pucker Factor

    Quote Originally Posted by RayCo
    This is part of the reason I mow with a small John Deere lawn tractor. When I'm going sideways on a slope, I can just lean to counterbalance the thing. I need to lose a few pounds, but even with my extra weight, I sure wouldn't be able to do that with the BX!

    The JD probably weighs only 2.5x as much as I do. It's nice when I get it stuck in some mud or have the drive wheel up in the air, and I can just lean my weight to get traction. Can't do that with the BX either, although I can pull myself out of jams with the backhoe.
    I had a small tractor and tried that, after a few front tires popping the beed and some un-controlled descents down the hills and not enough power to go up the hills, I gave it up.

    I'm working on filling in a lot of the property, hopefully one day it will be semi-flat.

    I do live in WV, and there are few natural flat spots.
    Brian

    2008 2500HD CC SB Duramax 6.6L
    2005 Suzuki Eiger
    2009 Rubicon 4-wheeler
    2011 John Deere 2520, FEL, and 62D belly mower, 6 foot box blade, 6 foot rear blade, a set of pallet forks, a 5 foot brush hog.

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