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  1. #11
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    JD 2320

    Default Re: Turbo Cool-down

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken45101 View Post
    If all of that extra running is really required, all I have to say is d*** stupid EPA. How much extra fuel and pollution is caused by that idle running?

    The M9540 only gains one additional horsepower with the turbo. EPA forces the turbo requirement.

    For me, I take the equipment back to the barn at a slow RPM and maybe give it 30 seconds before turning it off.

    I'll have to check my pickup owner's manual but I don't remember any requirement to let it idle for 5 or 10 minutes every time I drive the truck anywhere! I can't imagine having to sit at idle for five or ten minutes every time I use it. Ken
    if it is turbocharged then it IS in the owner's manual!



    Quote Originally Posted by BeezFun View Post
    Are the temps in a turbo higher than the temps in the cylinder? Why doesn't the oil carbonize in the oil scraper rings, on the cylinder walls, and in the passageways between cylinders up to the head?
    but the block is water cooled and does transfer heat away from everywhere else but the turbo. that is unless the turbo is water cooled too.


    Quote Originally Posted by K7LN View Post
    1) I thought maybe you were pulling my leg on this and trying to set me up.

    2) Combustion comes first. Things only cool down after that, but the turbo temp is definitely up there.

    3) No they send text message or use their cell phones. The cool down isn't that big of an issue. Often you finish your work, cut the RPMs and loaf back to your parking area. That can provide most of your cool down time. In the case of the Saabs, they probably aren't really being worked before being shut off. Some manufacturers have even provided an oil reservoir that supplies oil to the turbo after the engine is shut off.
    not necessarily, some are actually HIGHER in the manifold! one example is a Dodge Cummins during an active regen since fuel is still burning in the exhaust to raise the temps to initiate the regen.
    most if not all newer automotive Turbocharged cars are also using water cooled turbos. which makes the cool down time not as critical. it is still recommended though.
    Last edited by scrappy isb67; 06-18-2012 at 11:49 PM.
    2010 JD 2320, 200cx, Frontier 1060R RFM, 2048 BB, LR1072 rake, IMatch, 5 suitcase weights.
    NEED MORE IMPLEMENTS!

  2. #12
    Veteran Member kuboman's Avatar
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    Canada
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    B3200, L5740,

    Default Re: Turbo Cool-down

    Quote Originally Posted by BeezFun View Post
    I'm still not sure I know it. Turbos spin at 100K+ rpm, and they're driven off exhaust gases, doesn't seem impossible that local temps could rival combustion temps. I've never owned a turbo before, it seems strange that such a sophisticated piece of equipment is dependent on people sitting in their cars and tractors with the engine idling to cool it off. Do people carry magazines in their glove box to read while they cool down their saabs?
    As has been said most of the time the cool down happens as you park, unhitch, etc. The time a meaningful cool down is required is immediately after a hard workout. And even a non-turboed engine should be cooled down as many internal engine parts should have the temps stabilized before shut down. That time is dictated mostly by engine size (weight). A 2000# engine requires more stabilization time than a 200# engine.
    L5740 LA854 loader
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  3. #13
    Veteran Member MHarryE's Avatar
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    Northeastern Minnesota
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    JD 7720; Kubota M135GX, NH TS115A; JD 6230; Kubota L5740

    Default

    It's a good idea to let any engine cool after hard work. Older turbos had problems but new turbo technology and lube technology have lessened the need. My turbo equipped tractor says 3 minutes but I have always spent those 3 minutes, plus usually more, getting back to the yard after doing any tough work. My father-in-law is very impatient and always shuts the engine off no matter what he has been doing. His John Deere / Yanmar couldn't take the abuse (non-turbo) and cracked a couple valve seats. Give it a little time to cool things down evenly before shutting down and it will pay off in the long run, turbo or non-turbo.
    JD7720; KubotaM135GX; NH TS115A; JD6230; KubotaL5740

  4. #14
    Gold Member OrangeToys's Avatar
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    Missouri
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    2011 Kubota MX5100

    Default

    I think (not positive) that my book for the mx5100 says to let it slow down in winter months after its been ran a while. I guess ill have to go back and reread it. I don't recall anything else about the warm months.
    I like to push buttons that I dont know what they do to find out. Theres some I wont push anymore

  5. #15
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    Deere 4100

    Default

    The first truck I owned was a '66 Freightliner that had a NTC 335 HP Cummins. It had no after-cooler but did have a pyrometer. The pyrometer was there so you could keep your turbo temp at 1100 F. or less. You watched the pyrometer far more than any other gauge. I think if I stuck my foot in it for a few seconds I could get it up to 1300. The relevant thing to this thread is that the temp would drop a second or so after I backed out of it, if I recall (or guess) correctly, to 600 or 700 degrees. I remember the high temp but really don't remember the low temp because it wasn't important. I would let the engine cool down two or three minutes but not because of the turbo but more so that all the other iron would cool a bit. When it was cold, say -30 or so, I could pour more fuel to it and the pyrometer wouldn't get over 1100 but I never trusted the reading to be accurate at that ambient temp so I would actually keep the pyrometer at about 900.

    My last truck had an N14 Cummins turned up to 475 HP. The pyrometer never got over 900 degrees.

  6. #16
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    JD 2320

    Default Re: Turbo Cool-down

    Quote Originally Posted by rsewill View Post
    The first truck I owned was a '66 Freightliner that had a NTC 335 HP Cummins. It had no after-cooler but did have a pyrometer. The pyrometer was there so you could keep your turbo temp at 1100 F. or less. You watched the pyrometer far more than any other gauge. I think if I stuck my foot in it for a few seconds I could get it up to 1300. The relevant thing to this thread is that the temp would drop a second or so after I backed out of it, if I recall (or guess) correctly, to 600 or 700 degrees. I remember the high temp but really don't remember the low temp because it wasn't important. I would let the engine cool down two or three minutes but not because of the turbo but more so that all the other iron would cool a bit. When it was cold, say -30 or so, I could pour more fuel to it and the pyrometer wouldn't get over 1100 but I never trusted the reading to be accurate at that ambient temp so I would actually keep the pyrometer at about 900.

    My last truck had an N14 Cummins turned up to 475 HP. The pyrometer never got over 900 degrees.
    I have buried a 1600 degree pyro before! it was usually only for a few seconds and I let it run at idle 20+ minutes afterward. the rule of thumb I lived by was 300 deg. I actually had a turbo temp monitor set @ 300 degrees on that truck so I could turn the key off, lock the doors, and walk away and it wouldn't shut off until it was less than 300 degrees. if it was more than that at shutdown the exhaust temp would go UP after shutdown I.E. 400 deg. @ shutdown would be 550-600 a few minutes after shutdown. the turbo needs AIRFLOW to cool off!
    2010 JD 2320, 200cx, Frontier 1060R RFM, 2048 BB, LR1072 rake, IMatch, 5 suitcase weights.
    NEED MORE IMPLEMENTS!

  7. #17
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    Kubota BX2350

    Default Re: Turbo Cool-down

    Most auto-accessory shops should have a range of after-market turbo-timers which will allow the engine to idle for up to 5 minutes after turning off the key. I'm sure there would be one for a diesel or one could be adapted.

    One was fitted to my 96 Subaru wagon when I bought it but I don't know if it did anything (except waste fuel). Felt kinda weird walking away from the car in the parking lot, with the engine still running.

    Current vehicle is a 02 Subaru wagon with twin turbos. It has no timer but by the time I arrive home, check for mail, and drive the 300 yards to the house, it will have cooled down sufficiently.

    I was told that a rough guide as to whether you need a timer or not is, at night, give it a good workout, turn off the engine and ALL lighting, and if the turbo glows red, you need a timer.

  8. #18
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    Default Re: Turbo Cool-down

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Shooz View Post
    Most auto-accessory shops should have a range of after-market turbo-timers which will allow the engine to idle for up to 5 minutes after turning off the key. I'm sure there would be one for a diesel or one could be adapted.

    One was fitted to my 96 Subaru wagon when I bought it but I don't know if it did anything (except waste fuel). Felt kinda weird walking away from the car in the parking lot, with the engine still running.

    Current vehicle is a 02 Subaru wagon with twin turbos. It has no timer but by the time I arrive home, check for mail, and drive the 300 yards to the house, it will have cooled down sufficiently.

    I was told that a rough guide as to whether you need a timer or not is, at night, give it a good workout, turn off the engine and ALL lighting, and if the turbo glows red, you need a timer.
    if the turbo is glowing red you are well north of 1000 degrees!
    2010 JD 2320, 200cx, Frontier 1060R RFM, 2048 BB, LR1072 rake, IMatch, 5 suitcase weights.
    NEED MORE IMPLEMENTS!

  9. #19
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    Enid, OK
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    2012 John Deere 3720 eHydro

    Default Re: Turbo Cool-down

    Unlike a gas engine that controls both fuel and air cycling through the engine, at idle with no air restriction (but granted no turbo boost) very little of the oxygen coming in the engine is consumed by combustion. Turbo or not I'd think you'd want to bring the temp down.

  10. #20
    Veteran Member K7LN's Avatar
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    Default Re: Turbo Cool-down

    Quote Originally Posted by BeezFun View Post
    Are the temps in a turbo higher than the temps in the cylinder?
    Quote Originally Posted by K7LN View Post
    2) Combustion comes first. Things only cool down after that, but the turbo temp is definitely up there.
    Quote Originally Posted by scrappy isb67 View Post
    not necessarily, some are actually HIGHER in the manifold! one example is a Dodge Cummins during an active regen since fuel is still burning in the exhaust to raise the temps to initiate the regen.
    I'll still stick with my answer. The combustion chamber has some advantages (?) when it comes to high temperatures. First, you have the initial heat of compression. Then you have the actual ignition and flame front that is helped by a fresh dose of unburnt air. Any post ignition fuel injection for regeneration is not going to have the advantages of compression and fresh air. The fuel injected during regeneration can be very loosely compared to an oil burning furnace.
    JD 790 w/70 FEL & 7 BH on turf tires
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