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  1. #31
    New Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    15
    Location
    Fresno, CA
    Tractor
    Kubota L3130

    Default Re: Dirty oil

    About 840 hours.
    I think kubota says to change the oil at about 200 hours, and I doubt its been changed since the filter color is same color as engine, gray, and a service tech said that indicates its original.

    So maybe I should disregard the oil appearance and report and change it.......some of the fluid drive repairs seem to be extremely expensive, but it sure works nicely for me.

    Dale

  2. #32
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    3,324
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Tractor
    Ford 3930

    Default Re: Dirty oil

    Quote Originally Posted by cadale View Post
    About 840 hours.
    I think kubota says to change the oil at about 200 hours, and I doubt its been changed since the filter color is same color as engine, gray, and a service tech said that indicates its original.

    So maybe I should disregard the oil appearance and report and change it.......some of the fluid drive repairs seem to be extremely expensive, but it sure works nicely for me.

    Dale
    As I've probably posted before...... when I first started asking about tractor maintenance (in the real world, not just on here ) an old dealer mechanic's comment will always stick with me "Yep, Antifreeze and Hydraulic oil are two things on a tractor that often get neglected, for quite a long time".

    Aside from cost, people shy away from dealing with the volume of fluid involved. The deceptive thing with Hydraulic fluid (as compared to motor oil) is that it will usually look "good" for a very long time.

    Takes a bit of reading on here, but you'll often see the comment that Hyd fluid that is changed at the Manuf service point (hours) still looks fine. These people are doing the scheduled maintenance, because they understand the potential later costs and downtime involved with not doing it - they make the comment about the good "looking" used Hyd fluid as a genuine observation, more so than a complaint. OK, maybe some are complaining .

    I don't have an HST, but even so, I wanted to make sure that I had fresh hydraulic fluid in my old 3930. Once I did finally change it, I wished I had done it sooner. The Hyd oil that looked pristine on the stick, definitely looked less so, once drained. My guess is that even with a filter, the housing is designed to separate some water and have it settle in the sump. Once you dump all the oil out, the resulting mix of this older oil was way less pretty than it first appeared.

    The way I look at it is even without causing a near term major mechanical problem, Hyd fluid that is well past it's due date is not keeping up with preserving and conditioning seals in the system. Before you end up with mechanical problems, you could end up with Hyd leaks that may not have happened if the fluid had been changed on Sched.

    I shopped around and ended up with a Chevron fluid at a good price that was appropriate for my 3930. Won't help you, but I found it at Partsource here in Canada - just mentioning that to note that sometimes deals on Ag related stuff can be found with suppliers that you don't first think of for Ag. Or.... maybe just my thinking is too limited at times......

    For any used equipment that I buy, I always try and get all the fluids changed out fairly quickly. Most equipment is not that well maintained in terms of fluids, so it is time and money well spent on anything that you plan to have for a while. The worst thing that can happen is that you change out a fluid that is not that old - In the overall cost of a tractor, I can live with that....

    Not my style, but even if you turned around and sell it before long, the bills for all that maintenance should be a good selling feature.

    Rgds, D.

  3. #33
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,377
    Location
    Up State S.C.
    Tractor
    AC WD 34 hp/3500 lbs MF 261 60 hp/5380 lbs

    Default Re: Dirty oil

    Quote Originally Posted by cadale View Post
    Hello

    I just joined, after occasionally lurking here the past several years. After gained experience with old 50s tractors the past four years, I recently upgraded to a kubota L3130, with FEL.

    The engine oil was filthy, and the markings on the filter said 2009, so its been a while since any maintenance was done, but it runs well. Even after changing the oil and filter, the oil is still black.

    Should I run it a few hours and replace the oil, again?

    Also, there is a black knob atop the joystick which can slide into two positions-anyone know what its does? The control is an L2213A.

    thanx

    Dale
    You're lucky. The filter on my second hand tractor says 2006.

  4. #34
    New Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    15
    Location
    Fresno, CA
    Tractor
    Kubota L3130

    Default Re: Dirty oil

    D

    Thank you. I will change the hydraulic fluid, for the reasons that you articulated and which I would not have thought of.

    So no need to use kubota fluid? I have looked at a few other brands several weeks ago and found the ratings and descriptions a mite confusing. The Kubota seemed expensive. Can you recommend a rating that would work?

    Dale

  5. #35
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    3,324
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Tractor
    Ford 3930

    Default Re: Dirty oil

    Quote Originally Posted by cadale View Post
    D

    Thank you. I will change the hydraulic fluid, for the reasons that you articulated and which I would not have thought of.

    So no need to use kubota fluid? I have looked at a few other brands several weeks ago and found the ratings and descriptions a mite confusing. The Kubota seemed expensive. Can you recommend a rating that would work?

    Dale
    You're welcome Dale, always glad to share data on here !

    Your post reminded me of what I went through just a few years back, once I owned a tractor, as opposed to just hours spent driving tractors on friend's farms. Present day, I'm pretty maintenance aware, when it comes to cars and light trucks.

    Even so, the "Geez, that's a lot of hydraulic fluid, do I have to change all that right away ?" reaction is pretty natural.

    I will tell you the thinking I used when selecting fluid for my 3930, but as I don't know Kubotas at all, I'll start with these suggestions:

    Gathering Data requirements:

    1) Get a hold of the original Operating and/or basic Service manuals, if you don't have them already. You need to know the original Kubota Hydraulic spec required for your specific model. Don't just call a dealer and ask "What do I use in Model _______". I'll get back to this point.

    2) Start a thread in the Oil Fuel Lubricants section on here titled something like "Kubota L3130 - looking for recommendations on Hydraulic fluid". Briefly summarize your tractor (bought used, 8xx hours, looks original in terms of fluid/filter, a bit confused about specs.....), and ask for recommendations.

    How I approached my 3930:

    1) Manufacturer's will start with a spec for fluid. Let's call it xyz-A. As time moves on, that spec will get updated, for various reasons. (Progresses through -B, -C, -D........). I'm just making up a generic example here, but you get the idea..... (Typically retroactive, so a "-D" can be used for an older "-B" application, but not the other way around).

    An Ag dealer will only stock the latest spec fluid, again, for a few reasons. Should be good fluid, but spendy. When you will call a dealer, they will typically say "use xyz-D". If your older tractor was originally spec'd for -B fluid, then IMO, any fluid that is rated to at least the -B level is worth considering.

    2) The Certification Game - Kubota factory fluid will be certified to meet their OEM Hydraulic fluid spec. That certification process costs money, so for any after-market supplier of fluid to say "Meets or Exceeds UDT requirements", that will cost Exxon or whoever quite a bit, to put it on their label.

    (To be totally clear, I have no idea if UDT is what you need, pls verify).

    I don't discount the certification process involved - I know it's value in another technical world. The challenge for all of us is making the right value decision, when paying for fluid.

    If I bought a brand new $200,000 tractor, I'd probably buy the OEM's Certified fluid - I'd have the cash flow to make that decision (otherwise I wouldn't be buying the tractor), and would want to ensure warranty compliance.

    3) Certified vs. Recommended Fluids:

    OK, so how to sort out value in the fluid aftermarket...... Well, first of all, I won't look at Joe Schmos HD Highdrawlic discount fluid, so will stick with the majors.

    There are respectable Universal (meaning covers more than one manufacturer's application) Hydraulic Ag fluids out there. After doing a pile of reading on here and elsewhere, I settled on Chevron 1000 THF. Looking at the datasheet I pulled at the time, it says:

    Chevron 1000 THF is recommended for use:
    as a multifunctional fluid in all types of farm tractors
    and equipment.
    in any application which calls for the following OEM
    lubricant specifications:
    .
    .
    .
    .
    Kubota UDT
    .
    .


    Again, I don't know if UDT capable is what you need - pls verify. My emphasis on "recommended".

    I wanted to save myself some money on fluid, but didn't want to buy garbage. If you think about it, liability wise, "Recommended for...." is a whole lot different than "Meets or Exceeds spec XYZ". Anybody can say "Recommended for" on a product, w/o really guaranteeing any mimimum level of performance.

    So, my selection process boiled down to.....

    1) Do I want to pay for the Certified Ford NH spec fluid from the dealer - No.

    2) Can I live with the "Sootable fer Ford NuHawland applictions" claim on Joe Schmos HD Highdrawlic discount fluid - No.

    3) Can I (and my wallet) live with "Recommended for Ford NH ______ applications" statement on a Chevron product that I've searched around the net for problem reports on and found none - Sure, works for me.

    I'm not saying that all aftermarket off-brand Hyd fluid suppliers are junk, just that the elimination process I went through above was what I could justify to myself and my wallet.

    Chevron_1000THF.pdf

    I pulled that datasheet in 2011, you might want to spend the time digging through the Chevron site to see if there is an update to that. There is another file I have that is worth a quick read, I'll PM that next.

    Hope this helps you select an appropriate fluid - let us know what you settle on, and what the fluid you dump looked like - that feedback will help a future Kubota owner !

    Rgds, D.

  6. #36
    New Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    15
    Location
    Fresno, CA
    Tractor
    Kubota L3130

    Default Re: Dirty oil

    Well, I changed the out the hydraulic fluid and am happy I did it, but it was more of a chore then I expected. I ended up with about 10 gallons of fluid, and mopped up another 1 or 2 gallons from the floor. I also drained the front gearbox and replaced the fluid. It took a long time to get the oil in the front gearbox, as according to the dealer rep it needs to migrate past some bearings. I found that driving back and forth slowly helped the oil distribute (after I assumed enough oil was in both axle ends). I found it difficult to remove the HST transmission oil filter, even though I could get decent leverage using an oil filter wrench. The wrench just bent, so I bought a newer one (old one from 1960s), and it still bent, so I hooked a rope to the end of the lever and ran the rope end over the boxscraper with a pail of 5 gal UDT fluid as a weight, and then grabbed my large pliers and twisted on the filter and it gave way. Altogether I spent about 4 hours just replacing the fluids. I went with UDT as the local dealer said that would suffice.

    Many thanks to 3930Dave who posted much useful info and sent me more offline. I probably would not have changed it out but for his advice. The oil did not look as clean when in a drain bucket compared to the dipstick, being a dark brown rather than clear, but it also did not look the sludgy black that the engine oil did.

    I recycled the engine and hydraulic oil at the kubota dealer, where it all went into the same tank, yet my local auto parts dealer does not accept hydraulic oil. I wonder why not?

    I also tightened a hose clamp (rubber hose to metal tube hydraulic connection) at the base of the radiator and under the battery (L3130) which was leaking and where I spent an extra half hour trying to tighten the wrong end due I guess to aging eyeballs and a dose of stupidity. Anyway, obviously this is not a high pressure connection, so does anyone know the hydraulic fluid path used in cooling the transmission? I assume a separate pump would not be in order, so is a portion of the pressurized fluid reduced in pressure and sent to the radiator?

    Again, Thanks

    Dale

  7. #37
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    3,324
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Tractor
    Ford 3930

    Default Re: Dirty oil

    Dale - It's a lot of fluid to deal with, but it sure feels good to have that changed out, I'm sure.

    I don't know the CA regs/practices, but I suspect it is just a logistics issue for the auto place. Ag dealers are used to dealing with 10-20+ gallons of used fluid coming out of one vehicle, automotive guys not so much. Esp. the chain retail auto shops, they don't want to create a situation where they clutter up a shop with a backlog of used oil containers, waiting for an unexpected large load of oil to be picked up for recycling.

    We've already defined my non-knowledge of HST , so I won't guess on the dedicated-pump-vs-regulator issue.

    Somebody on here will likely know. If not, try sending a PM to brain55. As a pro, he seems to work on a lot of Construction equipment these days, but may have done his share of Ag too. It sounds like he's gotten even busier than normal lately, so don't be surprised if you don't hear from him for a bit.

    http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/c...y-weekend.html

    Rgds, D.

  8. #38
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    715
    Location
    Brampton, On\lot Powassan, ON Canada
    Tractor
    Kubota B4200\MF 135\Kubota B3200

    Default Re: Dirty oil

    Black Oil is easier to read on the dipstick The oil in my 40 year old Massey 135 is always clean. Might have something to do with the quart of new oil required daily when working it hard. (Leaks, does not smoke)
    Unimogdave

  9. #39
    Veteran Member theboman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Posts
    1,576
    Location
    Grayson, KY
    Tractor
    Kubota B7500 HST

    Default Re: Dirty oil

    I'm not sure it's been addressed, but diesels are dirty... new oil gets dirty looking very fast... just change as schedule suggests or even more often. My F250 was that way and my B7500 is that way.
    Bo McCarty
    THE BO-MAN, er BO-DADDY

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