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  1. #1
    New Member
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    Des Moines, IA
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    2010 Kubota Grand L5740

    Default Cold weather tractor problem

    I知 new to the forum, and would like to post a question. I have a 2010 kubota Grand L5740. It has just over 200 hours on it. I live in Iowa, and it has been very cold lately, sub 0 temps. Today, I pulled the tractor out to clear my driveway, and to move some wood. The tractor started and ran fine, I used it for maybe 20 min, and then parked it. I went back outside a couple hours later, started it, and put it back in the barn. I noticed when I got out, that it had a pretty good amount of oil leaking from underneath. When I got it inside, I crawled underneath, and saw that oil was leaking out of where the dipstick tube enters the case. I also noticed that the oil fill cap had blown off. I went inside to look some stuff up, and went I went back to check in it, it appears that oil is being blown out of my exhaust pipe. I did start it up again, and it started fine, and idled fine. Could it be a frozen pcv valve? Is there even one on this tractor. I知 clueless. Any thoughts or help is appreciated.

    Jesse

  2. #2
    Gold Member jabelding's Avatar
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    Maine
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    2014 Kioti CK35 Deere 430 L&G

    Default Re: Cold weather tractor problem

    I would say you definitely have a frozen crank case vent, normally it is on top of the valve cover with a tube back into the intake.
    2014 CK 35 - KL130 FEL, 55" EA wicked root grapple, 3rd function, 2475 backhoe, 5' bush hog, woods 5000 chipper shredder, 5' Howard tiller, post hole digger, 60" rear blade, 5' finish mower. 18' 10K SURE-TRAC trailer.

    1987 Deere 430 L&G -Deere Cab, 47" blower, 60" mower deck, 42" front 4 way blade.

  3. #3
    New Member
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    Des Moines, IA
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    2010 Kubota Grand L5740

    Default Re: Cold weather tractor problem

    Thank you for the response. From everything I have read, that seems to be the case. I just can’t find the dang vent.

  4. #4
    New Member
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    Des Moines, IA
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    2010 Kubota Grand L5740

    Default Re: Cold weather tractor problem

    If it is a blocked or frozen crankcase vent, what would make oil come out of the exhaust?

  5. #5
    Veteran Member rScotty's Avatar
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    Rural mountains - Colorado
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    Kubota M59, JD530, JD310SG. Restoring Yanmar YM165D

    Default Re: Cold weather tractor problem

    Quote Originally Posted by JesseWC View Post
    I知 new to the forum, and would like to post a question. I have a 2010 kubota Grand L5740. It has just over 200 hours on it. I live in Iowa, and it has been very cold lately, sub 0 temps. Today, I pulled the tractor out to clear my driveway, and to move some wood. The tractor started and ran fine, I used it for maybe 20 min, and then parked it. I went back outside a couple hours later, started it, and put it back in the barn. I noticed when I got out, that it had a pretty good amount of oil leaking from underneath. When I got it inside, I crawled underneath, and saw that oil was leaking out of where the dipstick tube enters the case. I also noticed that the oil fill cap had blown off. I went inside to look some stuff up, and went I went back to check in it, it appears that oil is being blown out of my exhaust pipe. I did start it up again, and it started fine, and idled fine. Could it be a frozen pcv valve? Is there even one on this tractor. I知 clueless. Any thoughts or help is appreciated.

    Jesse
    Welcome to TBN, Jesse.

    Yep, those are classic signs of a frozen PCV valve. Your Grand L5740 and my M59 use the same engine - and same transmission, I believe. So they probably use a similar or same device for Positive Crankcase Ventilation.

    That problem of PCV valves freezing in very cold weather has been around since PCV valves were invented. And it is a known problem with Kubotas which has been written about on TBN before now. It can happen to any engine in in real cold weather if the motor isn't working hard enough to get warm. You might want to tie a string to the oil dipstick so that if it blows out you can find it again.....no, I'm not kidding. It hasn't happened to me, but I recall someone posting about it.

    The good news is that this pressure in the crankcase in cold weather is a known problem and probably not anything serious - but you should vent it to protect the engine seals.

    Some history: Before PCV valves, crankcase ventilation was simply vented via a tube directly into the open air. You can still do that if you wish. Be aware that a direct vent pollutes the atmosphere with oil/water vapor and is a path for contaminents back into the engine. Both of those problems were mitigated 50 years ago by running the vent tube into a "breather cannister" instead of routing the vented fumes back into the intake manifod as is common today. The breather cannister was basically a tin can filled with a metal fiber filter material that became very oily. The water vapor evaporated away.

    The PCV valve on your engine is hopefully like other Kubotas and consists of a gizmo mounted right in the middle of the valve cover. In fact, the valve body should be the next & only thing rearward of the oil fill cap right there on top of the valve cover. You should see a hose or tube connected to it. The problem is condensation freezing - just as you suspected. The engine doesn't get things hot enough. Removing 4 bolts on the top of the PCV body gives you access to a spring and diaphram that are the heart of the PCV itself. That's probably where it is frozen up, although there is some chance that some condensation at a low point in the breather hose has made an ice blockage in the hose.

    If you change the existing system, take a moment to think about which way the pressures are going. At certain RPMs combined with certain coolant temperature the turbo pressurizes the intake manifold via the EGR valve - that needs to be considered.

    I guess you could try to heat the PCV valve or tape some insulation over it so that the engine would heat it more.

    Or you could just poke a hole in the oil filler cap and run a hose from that cap into a home-made breather cannister. Instant old style venting.

    I haven't done anything to our M59 because we haven't had that freezing problem, probably because our winters here in the Rocky Mountains have been fairly mild since we got the M59. Some people say global warming....but I don't know if that's it. I do know that warmer winters with hardly any snow have become the norm here in the last decade.
    Good Luck,
    rScotty
    Last edited by rScotty; 01-16-2018 at 09:53 AM.

  6. #6
    Platinum Member TMGT's Avatar
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    Jul 2015
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    Stafford, VA
    Tractor
    B2620

    Default Re: Cold weather tractor problem

    High enough crankcase pressure can cause oil to be pushed past the rings/valve seals and come out the exhaust. Is it just a trace of oil or large quantity?

    The short run time in the cold can be problematic, just enough temp to put moisture into the breather but not enough to burn it off and clear it out.

  7. #7
    New Member
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    Des Moines, IA
    Tractor
    2010 Kubota Grand L5740

    Default Re: Cold weather tractor problem

    Thank you guys so much for the help, I should have joined this a long time ago. I’ll see if I can post a picture here of my oil fill hole, before I found the fill cap and put it back in. Is the PVC valve body in this pic?
    Cold weather tractor problem-db01127b-8328-426b-be35-50734db98809

  8. #8
    New Member
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    Des Moines, IA
    Tractor
    2010 Kubota Grand L5740

    Default Re: Cold weather tractor problem

    As far as the amount of oil coming out of the exhaust, I think a small amount. When I noticed oil leaking under the tractor, there was no oil on the exhaust tip, or below it. It wasn’t until after I went back into the barn a while later, that I noticed maybe 10 to 15 trips worth had come out, while the engine was off.

  9. #9
    Super Member Tx Jim's Avatar
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    Jan 2007
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    7,080
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    Coyote Flats,Tx
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    JD 4255/Kubota M7040 HDC

    Default Re: Cold weather tractor problem

    Jesse
    Engine crankcase breather is located on the top of valve cover.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Cold weather tractor problem-capture-png  

  10. #10
    Veteran Member rScotty's Avatar
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    Rural mountains - Colorado
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    Kubota M59, JD530, JD310SG. Restoring Yanmar YM165D

    Default Re: Cold weather tractor problem

    Quote Originally Posted by Tx Jim View Post
    Jesse
    Engine crankcase breather is located on the top of valve cover.
    Thanks for posting the picture, Jim. That should be it. Jesse, do you have part that on your motor?
    BTW, in my parts manual the hose connection part 030 is listed as a "pipe, water return" which was either a case of amazing prescience on the part of the illustrator or more likely a (deliberate?) mistake.

    The tube carries vapor, not water, and connects to the intake side of the turbo where it is designed to scavange oil and water vapor via the PCV valve (note to self: PCV; not PVC !!) and reburn those vapors in the engine. Thus complying with one part of the interim tier IV emissions requirements while either missing or ignoring the point of the regulations in the first place.

    The PCV system is not mentioned by name in the parts manual; although you can find that picture that Jim posted on the page for the "head cover" i.e. the valve cover. Where the PCV valve assembly should be called out in the parts below the illustration is an oddity: an unusual blank entry. Nor is there any mention of the PCV breather assembly in the otherwise very complete engine section of the work shop manual.

    So I think we are on our own here. Luckily the illustration does show a very nice exploded view of all the parts and that valve looks easy enough to take apart, clean, and/or modify.
    There are enough of those interim Tier IV motors out there that we ought to just go ahead fix the problem. Any ideas? One way would be to get a slight amount of heat to the PCV valve. There's a handy hot exhaust pipe nearby.
    rScotty

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