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  1. #1
    Gold Member HarleyScooter's Avatar
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    Jun 2004
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    265
    Location
    Canton, Ohio
    Tractor
    Kubota/ BX2230

    Default BX2230 Block Heater?

    I was following a thread here about block heaters, and it looked like a good idea to have one, so I ordered one from my dealer and when it came in it was a aftermarket bottom radiator hose heater with a kubota part number on it, I also contacted Tractor Smart and they said, that they use a hose heater on the BX2230. I took the cowling off the tractor today and I really can see nowhere to install the inline heater, the instructions say to install it in a three inch straight section of hose that goes uphill to the block. The lower hose has almost no straight sections and no room for the offset of the heater and the 110 volt wiring plug. Does anyone know where I can buy a block heater for a BX2230?
    Thanks
    HarleyScooter [img]/forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif[/img]

  2. #2
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    116
    Location
    Rochdale, MA
    Tractor
    Kubota BX2230

    Default Re: BX2230 Block Heater?

    Harleyscooter,

    I have the block heater installed as you describe on my BX2230. It goes right in line next to the oil filter. It does fit. In fact, I have a T fitting installed before the block heater going to my cab heater as well. Everything was tight but it will fit.

    Steve

  3. #3
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    2,438
    Location
    20 mi SE of Sacramento, CA-rural
    Tractor
    Kubota BX2200

    Default Re: BX2230 Block Heater?

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( I have the block heater installed as you describe)</font>

    Steve, What you have is NOT a BLOCK heater; it is an inline hose heater and it is not as effective as a block heater. HarleyScooter, I would take it back to the dealer. Tell him he did not give you what you asked for insist that he reorder what you asked for: a BLOCK heater.

  4. #4
    Super Member Henro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    5,294
    Location
    Few miles north of Pgh, PA
    Tractor
    Kubota B2910, BX2200, Yardman 20HP pos...

    Default Re: BX2230 Block Heater?

    My BX2200 has a block heater that goes into the side of the block.

    I would never want a heater that goes into the water hose myself.

    Get the correct heater...you will thank yourself later I bet...

    Maybe someone here can help with the part number of the block heater for the BX2230.

    In my opinion the true block heater is the way to go. At least for me...I would not be satisfied with anything else.




  5. #5

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    85
    Location
    Manitowoc Wisconsin
    Tractor
    2004 BX 1500

    Default Re: BX2230 Block Heater?

    Yes that was the thread i started and am having the same questions on. The inline heater i got was aftermarket also but with a kubota part number on it. I wonder if all the inline heaters are that way.

    Original thread here

    I would like the block heater myself but I was told they do not make one for the BX 1500 so I guess the only heater would be the inline......

  6. #6
    Gold Member HarleyScooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    265
    Location
    Canton, Ohio
    Tractor
    Kubota/ BX2230

    Default Re: BX2230 Block Heater?

    Steve, I looked at the tractor again today, and I think my problem maybe the larger alternator I installed, it takes up more space in the area around the oil filter.
    Tom, I am planning on taking the heater back, they did order a block heater according to the whole parts book, but the inline heater is what was sent with the part number for a block heater. It just puts out way to much heat on its housing to install close to wires, hoses, or the plastic coolant overflow tank. I think what I will try to do is find a small pad heater that I can attach directly to the bottom of the oil pan, we had them at work to heat bulk oil tanks in the winter and they worked good. I am thinking that heating the oil will help in start up lubrication in cold weather and somewhat heat the block and coolant also.
    Thanks
    HarleyScooter

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    7,386
    Location
    North East CT
    Tractor
    2003 Kubota BX-22

    Default Re: BX2230 Block Heater?

    I am just taking a stab at this one, but my first impression is that the in line heater is because the new block that is used with the 2230 doesn't have a place to install a true block heater. The in-line heater will work just as well and it won't get too hot once there is fluid moving through it. The in-line heater is better than no heater. Heating the oil isn't as good as heating the coolant of the engine. With a heater installed on the bottom of the engine pan, the oil will be warm, but the rest of the engine is still cold. However, like most things, something is better than nothing. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

  8. #8
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    2,438
    Location
    20 mi SE of Sacramento, CA-rural
    Tractor
    Kubota BX2200

    Default Re: BX2230 Block Heater?

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( The in-line heater will work just as well)</font>

    Just curious Junkman, have you read anything to support this or have you ever used both an inline and a block heater on the same engine to compare them? I'm not trying to be difficult; I haven't done either myself. I just wonder what you're basing this statement on. Though I teach other things now, I do hold a certificate to teach Physics. It seems very counterintuitive that an inline coolant heater could be as effective as a block heater. The thermal flow from an inline heater would be limited to the transfer through the coolant in the hose up and into the block. The majority of the heat would radiate off into space from the hose. A heater in the block would have a much smaller amount of the heat radiate off into space. As the heat leaves a block heater it has only a very short distance to flow before entering the block itself. The iron from which the block is constructed has a much higher thermal conductivity than the coolant itself, therefore the heat should be quickly transferred throughout the entire engine.

    You made the comment that once the fluid is flowing that the heat from an inline heater should be quickly transferred into the block. The thing is, the fluid is not going to flow until the starter turns the crankshaft. Once combustion begins, the buildup of heat is self-sustaining and an external supplemental heat source is no longer needed. The only way an inline heater could get the majority of its heat into the block is if the water pump could be activated independently from all the rest of the engine for 10-15 min. prior to cranking.

    The block heater provides the heat where it is needed, inside the block itself. The compression of air by the piston during the compression stroke concentrates whatever calories of heat that already exist into a smaller space, thus raising the temperature. Much of that heat instantly flows into the cylinder walls. If the cylinder walls are too cold, the temperature increase from the compression still does not raise the temperature to the combustion point of the number 2 fuel oil. Having the temperature of the cylinder walls elevated by use of the block heater means that fewer therms of energy flow into the cylinder walls during the compression stroke, leaving the compressed air hot enough to ignite the #2 fuel when it is injected into the compacted and pressurized cavity between the head and piston.

    This is my theory, but it is an educated theory. Anyone who has evidence to the contrary, whether through measured tests or anecdotal experience, I would very much like to hear it.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    7,386
    Location
    North East CT
    Tractor
    2003 Kubota BX-22

    Default Re: BX2230 Block Heater?

    I have learned long ago not to get into discussions with the "engineering" type of mind that tries to analyze everything to the nth degree. I have used the in line heaters before and the warmth of the coolant has been sufficient to open the thermostat and allow the coolant to circulate. True, it isn't as good as the directly inserted into the block water heater, but if there is no hole to insert a heater into (my assumption) what are you to do? We could debate this till the cows come home, but I don't believe in beating a dead horse, nor do I want to learn how. You are welcome to your analysis of the situation, but when push comes to shove, and there is only one choice, it is clear to me what to do. The ideal is to have a heated garage, but for those that don't, then they will just have to settle for the next best thing. A block heater if they have the older BX series, and an in line heater if they have the latest generation of the BX series. People with the BX1500 have always had only one choice..the in line heater. Now, the people that have purchased the BX23, can still have a block heater unless kubota has started to install the next generation engine into them.
    Now, my question to you is...... Where is the water pump located on a Corvair????? [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img] [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

  10. #10
    Super Star Member Egon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    17,527
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada

    Default Re: BX2230 Block Heater?

    Junkman:

    The inline hoze heater on my kubota B7100 works just fine even at -35C. If left plugged in long enough it will even warm the oil cooler by heat transfer from the coolant radiator.

    Egon






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