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  1. #1
    New Member mdcar's Avatar
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    Smithfield, KY
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    1951 8n, Kubota L3901

    Default Shopping for a Tractor

    I am currently looking for another tractor to replace my Ford Jubilee. The Jubilee does everything I need except lift the larger bales of hay. I think I have decided on a MF 135 or MF 150, but I am not sure of the difference. From what I have read I think the Perkins diesel is the way to go. It would mainly be used with a rotary cutter and post hole digger. Could anyone tell me if this would be a good choice, what the difference between the tow models are and if they would be a good candidate for a front end loader if I ever wanted to add one.


    Thanks

    Matt

  2. #2
    Silver Member
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    Salem, Oregon

    Default Re: Shopping for a Tractor

    Does your Ford have room for larger Hyd cylinders?

  3. #3
    New Member mdcar's Avatar
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    1951 8n, Kubota L3901

    Default Re: Shopping for a Tractor

    To be honest I am not sure if it does.

  4. #4
    New Member
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    Default Re: Shopping for a Tractor

    Quote Originally Posted by mdcar
    I am currently looking for another tractor to replace my Ford Jubilee. The Jubilee does everything I need except lift the larger bales of hay. I think I have decided on a MF 135 or MF 150, but I am not sure of the difference. From what I have read I think the Perkins diesel is the way to go. It would mainly be used with a rotary cutter and post hole digger. Could anyone tell me if this would be a good choice, what the difference between the tow models are and if they would be a good candidate for a front end loader if I ever wanted to add one.


    Thanks

    Matt

    I helped my uncle move bales with his 35 and it danced all over with the load. So due to weight of tractor I do not think you would be much better off with a 35 or 135.

    I would move up to at least a MF 165, try to fine one of the later ones made as it will have sq axles housing and a 4 speed transmission with hi/lo.

    I have also seen one with a front end loader working a small logging operation and it had muscle for that operation.

    Good luck, wish I was in a position to look for a larger tractor.

  5. #5
    Elite Member WilliamBos's Avatar
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    May 2004
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    4,816
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    Innisfil, Ontario, Canada
    Tractor
    MF 1635 12x12 Powershuttle

    Default Re: Shopping for a Tractor

    how big of a load were you moving?? Our trusty old 35 never had a problem pulling a baler and a wagon.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Shopping for a Tractor

    I keep waiting for Farmwithjunk to weigh in here, but he doesn't. I'll quote what I've learned about my 135 here.

    They are not well suited to a FEL. The existing hydraulic pump doesn't have enough volume to operate one effectively. The ones with loaders have a secondary pump operated by the PTO or in the front off the harmonic balancer. The front axle is also a tad light for any heavy operations.

    A 135 might pick up a round bale, but you better have some hellacious weights on the front end to keep the front tires on the ground.

    The 135 will run a rotary cutter or auger perfectly. The 150 is a beefier version of the 135, usually called an orchard model, and pretty scarce on the used market.

    Mine has the Perkins diesel and it is the most desired of the engines available in the 135.

    I hope FWJ will correct any errors I have made and also provide you with additional information.
    Lyons, Texas
    Massey-Ferguson 135
    BCS 710GX
    Taxation WITH representation isn't so hot either.

  7. #7
    Super Member Farmwithjunk's Avatar
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    Where do I begin.....

    Default Re: Shopping for a Tractor

    The Ford Jubilee was/is a decent tractor, but the 135/150 Massey Ferguson is light years ahead of them. (I'll get to the differences between the 135 and 150 in a bit) With the Massey's you'll get more power, better over-all gearing, more lift capacity, a long list of possible options, and MOST OF ALL, LIVE POWER on the pto.

    135's and 150's will have one of 4 engine options. Gassers had either a Continental 4 cylinder or a Perkins 3 cylinder. Some 135's were offered as stripped down "economy" models. (w/o live power) They had either a Continental Z134 or Perkins AG3 152 (or Perkins AD3 152 diesel) The 135 deluxe (w/ live power) came with either a Continental Z145, Perkins AG3 152 gas, or Perkins AD3 152 diesel. Any of the gas engines are more than capable, very long lasting, dependable, and neither stands out above or below the other. The diesel is the preferred option though. The AD3 152 held Nebraska Test fuel economy records for many years (diesel powered MF150) They run and run and run. It's not uncommon to see them with 8,000 to 10,000 hours on the clock with no major repairs needed. The 3-cylinder Perkins is one of the cheapest engines around when it is time for a rebuild. Complete engine kits can be had for just over $400. Be it a 135 or a 150, the diesel powered ones are the cream of the crop.

    Massey Ferguson never kept detailed numbers on the 135's built, but between the Detroit Michigan plant and the Banner Lane plant in England, over 490,000 135's were produced. A plant in France also cranked out serious numbers of 135's too. During their production run, they were the number one selling tractor model in the world. No tractor model has been produced in as large of a volume since. At one point, 1 out of every 4 tractors sold new in England was a 135. They were produced in the US from 1964 to 1975. English plants produced the 135 until 1979. They continue to be one of the most best selling tractors ever on the used market. Their stone reliability, great fuel economy, utter simplicity to maintain, and great parts availability are unmatched.

    Both the 135 and the 150 share a great many components. Engine, drivetrain, hydraulics, and MOST of the option list are the same. Both have a 4.6 GPM internal hydraulic pump that operates (depending on a tranny/pto options), from 2800psi to 3450psi. They are MORE than capable of operating a loader. The relatively low gpm flow rate means a loader will be a little slower cycling than some newer tractors, but there are thousands and thousands of 135's and 150's with long histories of successful loader use.

    The difference between a 135 and a 150 makes the 150 a much better choice for a loader. The 150 was an off-shoot of the Ferguson F-40 and Massey Harris 50, then later, the Massey Ferguson 50. They evolved from the TO35 into a rowcrop utility variation. The 40/50/150 has a slightly longer wheelbase, which helps with stability under heavy loads on the 3-point hitch. That longer wheelbase comes about as a result of a much heavier front axle and axle bolster. That is of great advantage with a loader also. The different front axle comes with much better power steering which is essentially the same as a 65/165's. With a 150, you get a larger capacity fuel tank, bigger radiator, different air filter and filter location, all adding several hundred pound to the front end. A 150 will handle rear mounted weight much better than a 135. The different axle bolster also provided a strong mounting point for a loader, as well as mid-mounted cultivators. The 150 comes standard with PAVT (spin-out) rear wheels, flattop fenders, full lighting and instrumentation, power steering, and 2 of the 3 different transmission options available on the 135. (Standard equipment on 135's is a 3X2 speed, with 3X2 w/ multipower and 4X2 as options. The latter is standard on the 150 with the 3X2 w/ MultiPower as an option)

    The 150 IS NOT the "Orchard model" of the 135. The 135 was available as a standard, deluxe, orchard, vineyard, and industrial model (2135) The 150 came in Standard and High Arch models. High Arch tractors had larger 38" rear wheels with a choice of wide front axle, or narrow front models with either a single wheel or pair of wheels.

    I've personally owned a 150 since it was new in 1971, along with quite a few used 135's I've bought and re-sold over the years. WHile I an't attest to the individual condition of each used tractor, in general, IMHO they are the best tractor of their type ever produced. A few simple tools and a basic understanding of how they function and you can keep them on the job virtually forever. They are getting "of age" now, so some of them are getting a little worn down. Find one in good condition that's been cared for and you have a great tractor at a very reasonable price relative to the cost of a NEW tractor in the same size range.
    There are three kinds of men;
    1.) The ones that learn by reading
    2.) The few who learn by observation
    3.) The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.

  8. #8
    Veteran Member Nasty135's Avatar
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    Southern Md.
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    massey ferguson 135/1433v

    Default Re: Shopping for a Tractor

    Not to re-direct this post but I have a quick question.. Everytime I see a 135 and take a look at it, They have always been 3x2... Being slightly puzzled because mine is a 4x2 , so I'm wondering how popular was this option?

    Oh and I think LC92 was meaning the 135 was the orchord model...depending on how you read his comment

    mdcar, The 135 absolutely sipps fuel, you won't be sorry if you can find one, but I'm not so sure I would want a loader on one, Just my opinion...

  9. #9
    Super Member Farmwithjunk's Avatar
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    Where do I begin.....

    Default Re: Shopping for a Tractor

    Quote Originally Posted by Nasty135
    Not to re-direct this post but I have a quick question.. Everytime I see a 135 and take a look at it, They have always been 3x2... Being slightly puzzled because mine is a 4x2 , so I'm wondering how popular was this option?

    Oh and I think LC92 was meaning the 135 was the orchord model...depending on how you read his comment

    mdcar, The 135 absolutely sipps fuel, you won't be sorry if you can find one, but I'm not so sure I would want a loader on one, Just my opinion...
    I guess we'll have to wait on LC92's thoughts, because I read that as his thinking "the 150 is a beefier version of the 135, usually called an orchard model". Anyway, that isn't too important one way or another.

    The 4X2 tranny wasn't available right off the start with 135's or 150's. I don't have the serial # break when it became an option on the 135 and standard equipment on the 150, but I'm going to guess that was sometime around 1970 (+ or - a year or 2) My '71 150 has that tranny. Although I like MultiPower tractors, I much prefer the 8-speed version. Much simpler.
    There are three kinds of men;
    1.) The ones that learn by reading
    2.) The few who learn by observation
    3.) The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.

  10. #10
    New Member mdcar's Avatar
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    Location
    Smithfield, KY
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    1951 8n, Kubota L3901

    Default Re: Shopping for a Tractor

    Thank you for all the replies and information. I really think I would like to find a 150, but is the verdict that it still might not be able to handle the larger round bales. Could I put weights on the front? I know I would be very happy with either of these tractors, but it would have to lift the bales for me to justify the purchase.

    Farmwithjunk, I see you are in Kentucky. Do you know of any around for sale?

    Thanks

    Matt

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