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  1. #481
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    Default Re: My 1966 Massey 135 Tractor (Pics)

    I've made a lot of additional progress on my tractor and should have another update in a few days.

    Cleaning my garage somehow evolved into performing a few additional changes I've been meaning to make. The changes include: Moving a closet and wiring/plumbing it for my air compressor, removing a storage room to provide more open floor space in my workshop, removing floor tile (seen in many of my pictures), wiring for additional lighting, installing better insulation, adding new HVAC ducts, hanging Sheetrock, etc... Needless to say, I've been very busy.
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  2. #482
    Super Star Member murphy1244's Avatar
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    Nov 2011
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    Ohio
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    Kioti DK 40-Massey ferguson 135-Ventrac 4500 Diesel

    Default Re: My 1966 Massey 135 Tractor (Pics)

    Quote Originally Posted by Massey WV View Post
    I've made a lot of additional progress on my tractor and should have another update in a few days.

    Cleaning my garage somehow evolved into performing a few additional changes I've been meaning to make... Moving a closet and wiring/plumbing it for my air compressor, removing a storage room to provide more open floor space in my workshop, removing floor tile (seen in many of my pictures), installing better insulation, adding new HVAC ducts, hanging Sheetrock, etc... Needless to say, I've been very busy.
    The Man cave is very important. Proper balance for serenity.
    Murph ------------

  3. #483
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    Jan 2013
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    39
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    PA
    Tractor
    Massey Ferguson 135 Deluxe (IPTO)

    Default Re: My 1966 Massey 135 Tractor (Pics)

    Quote Originally Posted by MasseyWV View Post
    The transmission input shaft seals were replaced following procedures as outlined in the service manual. Overall, the process wasn't too bad, except that it was a bit more involved than I had first anticipated.



    I am going to start the input shaft seal replacement soon. By more involved do you mean there was more to it than the manual indicted? What did you use for seal protectors? You're pics are Great and actually somewhat helpful in and of themselves.

  4. #484
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    Default Re: My 1966 Massey 135 Tractor (Pics)

    Quote Originally Posted by klancf51 View Post
    I am going to start the input shaft seal replacement soon. By more involved do you mean there was more to it than the manual indicted? What did you use for seal protectors? You're pics are Great and actually somewhat helpful in and of themselves.
    The manual makes the transmission input shaft seal replacement procedure sound quick and easy, but the reality of it is a bit different. The process isn't extremely difficult, but it can be a bit tricky. If you run into trouble, send me a PM.

    Regarding seal protectors, if one is very careful and there are no sharp edges or burrs on the shafts, seal protectors really aren't necessary. However, I've used various kinds of thin tape as a seal protector on other projects. Blue painters tape works especially well for this purpose, among others.
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  5. #485
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    Jan 2013
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    PA
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    Massey Ferguson 135 Deluxe (IPTO)

    Default Re: My 1966 Massey 135 Tractor (Pics)

    Quote Originally Posted by MasseyWV View Post
    The manual makes the transmission input shaft seal replacement procedure sound quick and easy, but the reality of it is a bit different. The process isn't extremely difficult, but it can be a bit tricky. If you run into trouble, send me a PM.

    Regarding seal protectors, if one is very careful and there are no sharp edges or burrs on the shafts, seal protectors really aren't necessary. However, I've used various kinds of thin tape as a seal protector on other projects. Blue painters tape works especially well for this purpose, among others.
    I appreciate the offer and I will contact you if I get in over my head. Thanks man! -Frank-

  6. #486
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    Default Re: My 1966 Massey 135 Tractor (Pics)

    Quote Originally Posted by klancf51 View Post
    I appreciate the offer and I will contact you if I get in over my head. Thanks man! -Frank-
    No problem.
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  7. #487
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    Default Re: My 1966 Massey 135 Tractor (Pics)

    Quote Originally Posted by MasseyWV View Post
    I've made a lot of additional progress on my tractor and should have another update in a few days.

    Cleaning my garage somehow evolved into performing a few additional changes I've been meaning to make. The changes include: Moving a closet and wiring/plumbing it for my air compressor, removing a storage room to provide more open floor space in my workshop, removing floor tile (seen in many of my pictures), wiring for additional lighting, installing better insulation, adding new HVAC ducts, hanging Sheetrock, etc... Needless to say, I've been very busy.
    I'm still putting the finishing touches on my garage, so it might be several more days before I have time to post another update. However, I did manage to move my tractor from one side of the garage to the other because it was in the way. Note that my tractor currently has no wheels/tires, so moving it required a bit of ingenuity.

    Many of you may be wondering why I temporarily stopped working on my tractor so I could work on my garage. The short answer is that my garage was poorly insulated and I got tired of having to stop and clean it because it had insufficient storage space. Besides, there isn't a great deal of work left to do to my tractor, so there will be plenty of time for me to finish it by late spring or early summer.
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  8. #488
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    Default Re: My 1966 Massey 135 Tractor (Pics)

    The following are pictures of my tractor's rims, tires, and wheel center bolts/nuts after the tires and wheel centers were removed from the rims. Breaking the bead prooved to be quite a challenge, but more on that later...









    As you can see, the rims are heavily corroded due to calcium chloride leakage. Soon, the rims will be replaced with new ones, as the old rims are too far gone to repair. The bolts and nuts which held the wheel centers in place were also heavily corroded and a considerable amount of heat and persuasion with a hammer was required to get them free. The bolts and nuts will also be replaced with new ones.
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  9. #489
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    Default Re: My 1966 Massey 135 Tractor (Pics)

    Recently, when I removed my tractor tires from the rims so I could replace the rusted rims, I found that breaking the bead was exceptionally difficult, primarily due to corrosion caused by calcium chloride. After attempting other methods (wedges, etc..) I solved the problem by making a simple DIY bead breaker using nothing more than a length of wood 4x4 post and two short lengths of scrap wood.



    The DIY bead breaker was constructed by securing one two foot length of scrap wood to the wall of my garage about 18 inches off the floor, before placing the tire and rim beneath it. A six to eight foot length of 4x4 post was then laid across the tire and positioned so that the end of it was beneath the length of scrap wood previously secured to the wall. The remaining short length of wood (about 12 inches long) was positioned and temporarily held so that the edge of it (cut on a slight angle) rested against the tire/rim interface (the bead), before lifting the 4x4 post and placing it across the short length of wood (held against the bead) and ensuring that the end of the 4x4 post was positioned under the edge of the piece of wood previously secured to the wall.



    After the bead breaker is positioned, one simply applies pressure at the end of the 4x4 post to break the bead, rotating the tire slightly and repeating as necessary. Note that the whole process of assembling or positioning the DIY bead breaker sounds complicated in writing, but the reality of it is extremely simple.

    The DIY bead breaker uses an engineering principal known as force amplification, where one end of a lever is placed on or against a fulcrum and a small force is applied to the other end, generating a large force at a point very close to the fulcrum. In this case, the lever used is classified as the second of three types or orders of levers. A wheelbarrow is a simple example of a second-order lever.

    First-order levers:
    • the fulcrum is positioned between the effort and the load
    • the effort is smaller than the load
    • the effort moves further than the load
    • the lever can be considered as a force magnifier


    Second-order Levers:
    • the effort and the load are positioned on the same side of the fulcrum but applied in opposite directions
    • the load lies between the effort and the fulcrum
    • the effort is smaller than the load
    • the effort moves further than the load
    • the lever can be considered as a force magnifier


    Third-order Levers:
    • the effort lies between the load and the fulcrum
    • the effort is greater than the load
    • the load moves further than the effort
    • the lever can be considered as a distance magnifier


    Using the formula "F*L=W*X" or "F=(W*X)/L" one can easily determine what any force being applied at the end of the lever will yeild at the point where the resistance or weight is being overcome. In the formula F is the force applied at the end of the lever, W is the weight or resistance being overcome, L is the length of the lever between the fulcrum and the point where the force is being applied, and X is the distance between the fulcrum and the weight or resistance being overcome.



    For example: If the lever was 8 feet long and the resistance (the bead) was 1 foot from the fulcrum, applying 25 pounds of force at the end of the lever would yield 200 pounds of force at the point of resistance (the bead), effectively magnifying the applied force by a factor of four. In other words... 25=(200*12)/96

    As you can see from the images in my previous post, the DIY bead breaker works like a charm.
    Last edited by MasseyWV; 02-12-2013 at 11:22 PM.
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  10. #490
    Bronze Member
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    Aug 2012
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    89
    Location
    Bowling Green Kentucky
    Tractor
    Massey 135

    Default Re: My 1966 Massey 135 Tractor (Pics)

    WV, when and if you every publish a new Massey 135 shop manual, I want to be one of the first to buy it.

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