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  1. #11
    Elite Member
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    Apr 2012
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    4,106
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    Middle Tennessee
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    My tractor is an old MF

    Default Re: Rear tire spacing on a MF 35

    Quote Originally Posted by promethiusgarden View Post
    I believe that answers it, I might be purchasing a 35 quite soon, it's close and the price is right. Thank you.
    There is a guy down the road from me that has an original 1967 Deluxe 135 and looks to be totally complete with a new clutch for around $2800. If it's not raining tommorro I'm going back to check it out. My wife threatened to put a gun to my head.. <jk>

  2. #12
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    132
    Location
    Northeast
    Tractor
    1955 Ferguson TO-35

    Default Re: Rear tire spacing on a MF 35

    As you've discovered, there are several rear tread widths available. In my experience, no combination will hit the brake drums. If you do decide to separate the wheel spider ( bolts to the axle) from the outer rim, the outer rim bolt/nuts are sometimes rusted, and not worth reusing. It's a good place to use an impact wrench for removal. However, replacement bolts and nuts are as close as your Lowes store , and inexpensive. The 5/8 inch hot dipped galvanized carriage bolts ( smooth head, square just under the head) are a perfect match for your rim bolt loops. I don't recall the length you need, but that's easy to measure. You'll want some galvanized lock washers too. As for the lug nuts, they're not so easy to replace. Put some penetrating oil on them for a couple of days first. On my 1955 Ferguson TO-35, I've found the lug nuts to be in good shape , and they're easy to remove.

  3. #13
    Elite Member
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    My tractor is an old MF

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WilliamTO-35
    As you've discovered, there are several rear tread widths available. In my experience, no combination will hit the brake drums. If you do decide to separate the wheel spider ( bolts to the axle) from the outer rim, the outer rim bolt/nuts are sometimes rusted, and not worth reusing. It's a good place to use an impact wrench for removal. However, replacement bolts and nuts are as close as your Lowes store , and inexpensive. The 5/8 inch hot dipped galvanized carriage bolts ( smooth head, square just under the head) are a perfect match for your rim bolt loops. I don't recall the length you need, but that's easy to measure. You'll want some galvanized lock washers too. As for the lug nuts, they're not so easy to replace. Put some penetrating oil on them for a couple of days first. On my 1955 Ferguson TO-35, I've found the lug nuts to be in good shape , and they're easy to remove.
    Be careful using bolts other than the required bolts. The wheel bolts have a special notch of the head to keep them from turning while tightening to the rim center points. If I ever have to break my rims down i may have to buy new rims. It looks like someone had the same idea as yours and tack welded the bolt heads to the rim mounting loops.

    The special rim bolts are less than three dollars a piece and well the money to insure a secure attachment. They are specially made for a reason. You don't want to compromise safety to save a few bucks or connivence of purchase.

  4. #14
    Silver Member
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    Nov 2007
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    132
    Location
    Northeast
    Tractor
    1955 Ferguson TO-35

    Default Re: Rear tire spacing on a MF 35

    Kid- That's why I specified using carriage bolts , which have not just a notch, but a full square section under the head. That square section fits perfectly into the rim bolt loop, and prevents the bolt from turning while you tighten the nut. There's no danger using those carriage bolts, and they are more than strong enough. But you can certainly use original equipment bolts if you prefer, if they are readily available. At no point in my post did I recommend welding the bolt heads to the rim, nor is it necessary using the square shank on a carriage bolt. My observation is also that hot dipped galvanized carriage bolts have vastly superior rust resistance to the factory bolts, and if you ever have to remove them again, you won't have to buy new bolts.

  5. #15
    Super Star Member
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    Mar 2008
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    10,423
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    Northern Fingerlakes region of NY, USA
    Tractor
    Kubota L3830GST, B7500HST, BX2660

    Default Re: Rear tire spacing on a MF 35

    Quote Originally Posted by WilliamTO-35 View Post
    Kid- That's why I specified using carriage bolts , which have not just a notch, but a full square section under the head. That square section fits perfectly into the rim bolt loop, and prevents the bolt from turning while you tighten the nut. There's no danger using those carriage bolts, and they are more than strong enough. But you can certainly use original equipment bolts if you prefer, if they are readily available. At no point in my post did I recommend welding the bolt heads to the rim, nor is it necessary using the square shank on a carriage bolt. My observation is also that hot dipped galvanized carriage bolts have vastly superior rust resistance to the factory bolts, and if you ever have to remove them again, you won't have to buy new bolts.
    Just make sure they are the right grade bolt...

    Aaron Z
    A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
    Robert Heinlein, Time Enough for Love

  6. #16
    Silver Member
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    Nov 2007
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    Northeast
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    1955 Ferguson TO-35

    Default Re: Rear tire spacing on a MF 35

    Six 5/8 inch diameter bolts of ordinary grade have about 10 times the shear and tensile strength needed for this application. The 8 lug studs would fail long before these rim bolts would.

  7. #17
    Super Star Member
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    Mar 2008
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    Northern Fingerlakes region of NY, USA
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    Kubota L3830GST, B7500HST, BX2660

    Default Re: Rear tire spacing on a MF 35

    Quote Originally Posted by WilliamTO-35 View Post
    Six 5/8 inch diameter bolts of ordinary grade have about 10 times the shear and tensile strength needed for this application. The 8 lug studs would fail long before these rim bolts would.
    Ordinary grade being ungraded, grade 3, or grade 5? Most carriage bolts at my local Lowes are ungraded bolts.

    Aaron Z
    A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
    Robert Heinlein, Time Enough for Love

  8. #18
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    My tractor is an old MF

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WilliamTO-35
    Six 5/8 inch diameter bolts of ordinary grade have about 10 times the shear and tensile strength needed for this application. The 8 lug studs would fail long before these rim bolts would.
    Question is. How much torque can you put on a galvanized bolt before it compromises the coating. I still think jamming a carriage bolt is a bad idea. I don't think there is enough square to catch in the bolt hole. The factory bolt is designed to extend outside the tip cap of the bolt. There is a marking on the factory bolt with an arrow to align the bolt properly. Your assuming the square of a carriage bolt is going to fit in a 5/8 hole. The square cut of a carriage bolt is slightly larger thus it would have to be jammed into the opening. It might work, but certainly not the method I'd use. I'd use OEM replacement parts obtained thru a local dealer.

  9. #19
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    Dec 2012
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    42
    Location
    Floyd, VA
    Tractor
    MF 35

    Default Re: Rear tire spacing on a MF 35

    I bought it today.

    -3e73n43h85h45mc5j1cc16b7758eab3d01f2c-jpg

    -3ea3gd3n25g75e25m3cc141c06cbd55c810fd-jpg

  10. #20
    Super Star Member murphy1244's Avatar
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    Nov 2011
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    Ohio
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    Kioti DK 40-Massey ferguson 135-Ventrac 4500 Diesel

    Default Re: Rear tire spacing on a MF 35

    Quote Originally Posted by promethiusgarden View Post
    I bought it today.

    -3e73n43h85h45mc5j1cc16b7758eab3d01f2c-jpg

    -3ea3gd3n25g75e25m3cc141c06cbd55c810fd-jpg
    Yep, flip those rims.. Nice machine!
    Murph ------------

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