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  1. #1
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    Default New member- old tractor

    Hi all- New to these parts.

    Guys I am needing some advice. My wife and I recently bought 25 acres near where we live here on the Cumberland Plateau in TN. It is obviously an old home place, with several old fairly-level fields that have small trees, mostly less than 2.5-3" in diameter. Maybe these fields total around 12 acres. On the backside of a creek that separates our property in two halves is a large stand of hardwoods with mixed pines. The hardwoods make up the other 13 or so.

    What I'm looking at doing is clearing the old fields and briar thickets with a bush hog, and then planting alfalfa and orchardgrass for hay to supplement my daddy-in-law with hay.

    Currently I don't have a tractor, and he has a brand new 40hp Kioti with FEL (skid-steer quick-detach) FEL, auger, tiller, disc, 5' KK bush hog.

    I'm looking at a MF 135 with the 3 cyl diesel, multi-power, live PTO, belly mount PTO. I think this is a deluxe model. I know it doesn't have power steering. This is the old girl I'm looking at-


    The asking price is $3500, and I will go look at it tomorrow.

    My questions are these- is this enough tractor? I've looked at Big Dean's site thoroughly, and when I go to look at it tomorrow, I will of course look it over well. The owner says "the multi-power don't work- it free-wheels in low." Isn't this normal? Make me smart on multi-power, and specifically how to check that it works as it should. What implements do I need to do the jobs I'm describing- anything other than my daddy-in-law's KK bushhog? Is there a heavier-duty chopper that would be better? We don't have a hay baler- what would you guys recommend for a small twine square baler? Do I need to get a 2 bottom plow, or would discing this old place be enough? I'd like to stay with MF implements if at all possible, and cost is an issue. I'd rather look around at consignment sales, take my time and get just the right stuff (that matches!!) instead of buying something and it not working out for me.

    I'm sure that you all will have some questions, and I look forward to hearing from you guys.

  2. #2
    Super Star Member Egon's Avatar
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    Default Re: New member- old tractor

    Can't help you on the Tractor or the "multi power" but would suggest a plow and a disc for working the land prior to seeding grass. You may also want to look for a seed/fertilizer spreader.
    Egon
    50 years behind the times
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  3. #3
    Super Member Farmwithjunk's Avatar
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    Default Re: New member- old tractor

    Quote Originally Posted by mattgo
    The asking price is $3500, and I will go look at it tomorrow.

    My questions are these- is this enough tractor? I've looked at Big Dean's site thoroughly, and when I go to look at it tomorrow, I will of course look it over well. The owner says "the multi-power don't work- it free-wheels in low." Isn't this normal? Make me smart on multi-power, and specifically how to check that it works as it should. What implements do I need to do the jobs I'm describing- anything other than my daddy-in-law's KK bushhog? Is there a heavier-duty chopper that would be better? We don't have a hay baler- what would you guys recommend for a small twine square baler? Do I need to get a 2 bottom plow, or would discing this old place be enough? I'd like to stay with MF implements if at all possible, and cost is an issue. I'd rather look around at consignment sales, take my time and get just the right stuff (that matches!!) instead of buying something and it not working out for me.

    I'm sure that you all will have some questions, and I look forward to hearing from you guys.
    Worth $3500? In a New York Minute. More like $5000+ these days.

    MultiPower freewheels on downhills in low? It did from day one. Perfectly normal. Put it in hi/1st w/ MP in low about 1/4 throttle. Does it pull OK? Shift MP to high. Does the motor pull down a bit? Good solid shift? Speed increase? No oil pouring out from underneath the bellhousing? It works. Buy it. Buy it and haul it north to this area and make $1500. Just buy it. 135's are GREAT tractors. The Perkins AD3-152 diesel is one of the most fuel efficient engines ever built. Stone reliable, cheap to operate, cheap to maintain, and they last virtually forever. The tractor itself is as simple and basic as it gets. Get the manuals (owners, service, and parts) and anyone with average mechanical skills can work on the entire tractor, grill to draft arms.

    I've got a 1971 MF150. It's ALMOST the same tractor, just a heavier front end, a little longer wheelbase, heavier steering and bigger fuel tank. I wouldn't trade it for 10 NEW tractors. They're that good. If/when you get it, and if you have any questions, let me know. I've sort of adopted the 135/150 as a favorite and have every conceivable manual on them. (Owners, service, parts, technical service, hydraulic service, updated service supliments, Dealer "new customer instructional", flat rate labor, I&T, I&T flat rate, Perkins engine manual, and every piece of sales literature Massey ever issued)

    The KK mower is OK, but you can do better. I like Bush Hog brand mowers. The KK is a light duty mower for the most part. Medium or heavy duty mowers will handle the 2-1/2" to 3" stuff with less trauma. That tractor will handle a 6' mower power-wise, but a medium or heavy duty mower will be a little much without some front weights. (Let me know if you're interested in a set of front wheel weights to fit it. [shameless plug for something I'm selling]) If you want to stay with MF implements, look for a #66 or a #43 plow, 2X14" or 2X16"'s work well. Massey Ferguson made what I consider the finest 3-point disc ever built in the model #25. 6' or 7'-6" would work. Again, the larger of the 2 might require those front weights. Baler? That tractor has the same powerplant as my 150. I used a New Holland 273 for years, then switched to a Deere 336. I've just recently ran across a nice MF#24 baler. The tractor will handle any of those balers or comparable models/brands quite well. There's been billions of bales made behind 135's over the years.

    As far as what to do with your ground. Tough to say without knowing more. To establish a hay crop, you might be better off plowing and discing, but if you're dealing with small trees, ect, it may be best to simply disc it and let the roots rot away before plowing. I did that with my farm back some 38 years ago. I cleared most of the ground, disced to establish hayfields and pasture, then gradually tilled the place a little deeper to establish crop land.

    Pictured below is the 150, a #25 7'-6" disc, a #66 2X14" plow, Bush Hog 286 mower (since replaced by a 296 in the Bush Hog line) a #39 MF planter and a Deere #70 planter.

    Power wise, it handles a 6' tiller with relative ease, has many times handles a baler w/ wagon in tow, 100+ bales on the wagon, and has on occasion pulled a 3X12" plow or 8'10" disc.














    Last edited by Farmwithjunk; 03-24-2008 at 11:46 AM.
    There are three kinds of men;
    1.) The ones that learn by reading
    2.) The few who learn by observation
    3.) The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.

  4. #4
    New Member
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    Default Re: New member- old tractor

    Quote Originally Posted by mattgo
    Hi all- New to these parts.

    Guys I am needing some advice. My wife and I recently bought 25 acres near where we live here on the Cumberland Plateau in TN. It is obviously an old home place, with several old fairly-level fields that have small trees, mostly less than 2.5-3" in diameter. Maybe these fields total around 12 acres. On the backside of a creek that separates our property in two halves is a large stand of hardwoods with mixed pines. The hardwoods make up the other 13 or so.

    What I'm looking at doing is clearing the old fields and briar thickets with a bush hog, and then planting alfalfa and orchardgrass for hay to supplement my daddy-in-law with hay.

    Currently I don't have a tractor, and he has a brand new 40hp Kioti with FEL (skid-steer quick-detach) FEL, auger, tiller, disc, 5' KK bush hog.

    I'm looking at a MF 135 with the 3 cyl diesel, multi-power, live PTO, belly mount PTO. I think this is a deluxe model. I know it doesn't have power steering. This is the old girl I'm looking at-


    The asking price is $3500, and I will go look at it tomorrow.

    My questions are these- is this enough tractor? I've looked at Big Dean's site thoroughly, and when I go to look at it tomorrow, I will of course look it over well. The owner says "the multi-power don't work- it free-wheels in low." Isn't this normal? Make me smart on multi-power, and specifically how to check that it works as it should. What implements do I need to do the jobs I'm describing- anything other than my daddy-in-law's KK bushhog? Is there a heavier-duty chopper that would be better? We don't have a hay baler- what would you guys recommend for a small twine square baler? Do I need to get a 2 bottom plow, or would discing this old place be enough? I'd like to stay with MF implements if at all possible, and cost is an issue. I'd rather look around at consignment sales, take my time and get just the right stuff (that matches!!) instead of buying something and it not working out for me.

    I'm sure that you all will have some questions, and I look forward to hearing from you guys.
    MF dealer told me if I bought a used MF: did not matter if multi power was working or not, just buy it as if you were going to have to have it fixed, because you will soon, if it has not been repaired lately.

    I would not suggest buying an older tractor with fluid drive transmissions. They were great when new, but do not hold up like std transmission tractors for the long hall.

    example my 1957, TO-35 Ferguson has the straight 3 speed forward with hi-lo transmission and its still working properly after 50 years. Just service it properly and it keeps on going.

    This tractor you are looking at is much newer and is broken. I have driven a MF with multi power out, this is dangerous on down hills as transmission will not hold tractor back and sometime brakes are not enough.

    Leave it and get a newer tractor.

  5. #5
    Super Member Farmwithjunk's Avatar
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    Default Re: New member- old tractor

    Quote Originally Posted by maxwell1
    MF dealer told me if I bought a used MF: did not matter if multi power was working or not, just buy it as if you were going to have to have it fixed, because you will soon, if it has not been repaired lately.

    I would not suggest buying an older tractor with fluid drive transmissions. They were great when new, but do not hold up like std transmission tractors for the long hall.

    example my 1957, TO-35 Ferguson has the straight 3 speed forward with hi-lo transmission and its still working properly after 50 years. Just service it properly and it keeps on going.

    This tractor you are looking at is much newer and is broken. I have driven a MF with multi power out, this is dangerous on down hills as transmission will not hold tractor back and sometime brakes are not enough.

    Leave it and get a newer tractor.

    I read and re-read this post several times trying to find one shred of accuracy, but I failed to do so, quite simply because there just isn't any to be found.

    One, MultiPower ISN'T a "fluid drive" system. It's a mechanical drive that's shifting is actuated by hydraulic power generated by a seperate (auxillery) hydraulic pump, isolated from the pump that operates the rear hitch. Low range drive "ratchets" when over-ridden by high range. A servo that engages (and/or dis-engages) high range is hydraulic actuated . That's where the freewheeling comes from. That "ratcheting" low range. When the transmission is in HIGH, (direct drive) you have engine braking, eliminating the freewheel effect. Lo range on MultiPower was never intended for compression braking. It is a mechanical advantage in gearing for hard pulling.

    Your appraisal of MultiPower being dangerous when it's "out" is all wet and obviously the opinion of someone who's not very well versed on the subject to which he has spoken. MultiPower has ALWAYS from the day it was new, freewheeled in low range. (Same as a LOT of other brands of hi/low powershifts) Brakes on a MultiPower tractor are absolutely NO DIFFERENT than the brakes on a NON-MultiPower tractor If they're worn out and won't stop the tractor on a hill, it's of no fault of the MultiPower.

    The alleged "dealer comments" are ridiculous. MultiPower tractors are reliable and there are thousands, no, MILLIONS still on the job that have had no problems. Worldwide, just in the 100 series alone, there were over 275,000 MultiPower tractors produced. (In addition to 1000 series, 200 series, 1005 series, ect) A large part of them are still on the job. Only a small percentage are out of service due to catastrophic failure of the MultiPower system. (Usually pump failure when it did go out) They go back near 50 years and remained in production for more than 25 years. They were used on tractors well over 100 hp with only incidental failures. Like ANY mechanical item, there were some problems, but they had lower failure rate than the extremely popular International Harvester "T/A". I've bought and re-sold several MultiPower equipped Masseys with more than 7000 or 8000 hours that were still working just like the day they were new. The "weak link" in MultiPower was/is the cable linkage from the lever on the dash and down into the transmission housing. That is easily remedied if trouble does occur.

    There's no reason to believe the MultiPower is out, other that the current owner not knowing much about what he's saying, just as the above post, THINKING (incorrectly) that it's failed because of freewheeling on downhills.

    You simply leave a MultiPower equipped tractor in direct drive (high range) when operating on hills and it's no different than a NON MultiPower tractor. Gearing the same, engine braking the same. Operator error is not the fault of the machine being operated.
    Last edited by Farmwithjunk; 03-24-2008 at 03:48 PM.
    There are three kinds of men;
    1.) The ones that learn by reading
    2.) The few who learn by observation
    3.) The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.

  6. #6
    Gold Member
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    Nov 2007
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    333
    Location
    Great State of Idaho
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    T065 and a 165

    Default Re: New member- old tractor

    mattgo....I am just a dumb kid of a former Idaho Dirt Farmer. My daddy doesn't farm anymore cause he is 87 years old. I have been around farming most of my life and dabbled with it now and again. Never gotten rich, but did not lose alot of money either. As a kid I drove all types of tractors. From John Deere A to the "newer" ones that I don't know the model numbers.

    Here is my advice to you. BUY THE TRACTOR NOW!!! At that price you can not go wrong. I have two, a 65 series and a 165 model. Mine has the four cylinder Perkins motor. Just today, I had a ditcher hooked up to my 65, and had it buried soooooo deep that I was worried about being able to walk my tricycle tractor back over the ditch. It did not even squabble, spun the wheels a bit....but just kept chugging along.

    I also owned a 35 three cylinder Perkins MF tractor. I could pull a plow so deep that it would high center the tractor in the furrow.

    Finally, If it was me, I would listen to Farmwithjunk when it comes to all things Massey Fergusson. Especially that model!!! I have picked up more tips from reading his infomation regarding MF tractors and all of it correct, than you can imagine. Saved me a ton of money!!!

  7. #7
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    Default Re: New member- old tractor

    Well it's mine- I went today with my Pepaw (a mechanical genius!) and we checked it out. I paid $3400 for her. Mechanically, the old girl seems in good shape, with just a couple small leaks at the canister oil filter mount that bolts to the engine block and similar places. Absolutely no drooping of the 3 point at shut-off. No leak at the bellhousing.

    The Multi-Power does not work. Driving it home I had it in low, and coming down a hill, I put the MP lever into hi, with no change in speed, and the engine did not pull more RPMs to activate engine braking. I didn't feel much change in the lever itself- I'm kinda thinking it is in the linkage somewhere. So what do I do- fix the MP, or just leave it? The guy I bought it from was right about it, but he has owned it for the past 15 years and has had no problems. I'm curious as to how I should go about this, and whether or not it's something that can (or should) be repaired. I've read some posts about guys having their multi-power removed, and it costing them $500 or so. Any thoughts?

    Lights and the oil pressure and water temp guage are not hooked up, as this guy had goats that just love to chew on any loose wire. Me, I love to zip-tie loose wire so nothing snags it! So my mechanic (Pepaw) is going to get them all straightened out. Probably one-third of the reason I bought this tractor was to give him a project to do- he has restored two forties model cars in the past 3 years, and he's running out of stuff to keep him occupied.

    Look forward to your ideas. Farmwithjunk- I've read about 200 of your posts in the past week- hope you've got some advice for me.
    Here's some pictures:

    \

    Some other shots at these links:
    http://i182.photobucket.com/albums/x...1/DSC00840.jpg
    http://i182.photobucket.com/albums/x...1/DSC00842.jpg
    http://i182.photobucket.com/albums/x...1/DSC00826.jpg
    http://i182.photobucket.com/albums/x...1/DSC00838.jpg
    http://i182.photobucket.com/albums/x...1/DSC00837.jpg
    http://i182.photobucket.com/albums/x...1/DSC00839.jpg
    Last edited by mattgo; 03-24-2008 at 09:46 PM.

  8. #8
    Gold Member
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    T065 and a 165

    Default Re: New member- old tractor

    As one OLD mechanic told me. All of those Perkins leaked oil. That is unless you are Farmwithjunk...then you rebuild it to make it better than new....LOLOL.

    It looks very pretty to me, but I am partial to the "older" tractors.

  9. #9
    Gold Member
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    Kioti DK45SE HST

    Default Re: New member- old tractor

    That MF150 is absolutley beautiful. Almost too nice to use. ;o}

    Warhammer


    Quote Originally Posted by Farmwithjunk
    Worth $3500? In a New York Minute. More like $5000+ these days.

    MultiPower freewheels on downhills in low? It did from day one. Perfectly normal. Put it in hi/1st w/ MP in low about 1/4 throttle. Does it pull OK? Shift MP to high. Does the motor pull down a bit? Good solid shift? Speed increase? No oil pouring out from underneath the bellhousing? It works. Buy it. Buy it and haul it north to this area and make $1500. Just buy it. 135's are GREAT tractors. The Perkins AD3-152 diesel is one of the most fuel efficient engines ever built. Stone reliable, cheap to operate, cheap to maintain, and they last virtually forever. The tractor itself is as simple and basic as it gets. Get the manuals (owners, service, and parts) and anyone with average mechanical skills can work on the entire tractor, grill to draft arms.

    I've got a 1971 MF150. It's ALMOST the same tractor, just a heavier front end, a little longer wheelbase, heavier steering and bigger fuel tank. I wouldn't trade it for 10 NEW tractors. They're that good. If/when you get it, and if you have any questions, let me know. I've sort of adopted the 135/150 as a favorite and have every conceivable manual on them. (Owners, service, parts, technical service, hydraulic service, updated service supliments, Dealer "new customer instructional", flat rate labor, I&T, I&T flat rate, Perkins engine manual, and every piece of sales literature Massey ever issued)

    The KK mower is OK, but you can do better. I like Bush Hog brand mowers. The KK is a light duty mower for the most part. Medium or heavy duty mowers will handle the 2-1/2" to 3" stuff with less trauma. That tractor will handle a 6' mower power-wise, but a medium or heavy duty mower will be a little much without some front weights. (Let me know if you're interested in a set of front wheel weights to fit it. [shameless plug for something I'm selling]) If you want to stay with MF implements, look for a #66 or a #43 plow, 2X14" or 2X16"'s work well. Massey Ferguson made what I consider the finest 3-point disc ever built in the model #25. 6' or 7'-6" would work. Again, the larger of the 2 might require those front weights. Baler? That tractor has the same powerplant as my 150. I used a New Holland 273 for years, then switched to a Deere 336. I've just recently ran across a nice MF#24 baler. The tractor will handle any of those balers or comparable models/brands quite well. There's been billions of bales made behind 135's over the years.

    As far as what to do with your ground. Tough to say without knowing more. To establish a hay crop, you might be better off plowing and discing, but if you're dealing with small trees, ect, it may be best to simply disc it and let the roots rot away before plowing. I did that with my farm back some 38 years ago. I cleared most of the ground, disced to establish hayfields and pasture, then gradually tilled the place a little deeper to establish crop land.

    Pictured below is the 150, a #25 7'-6" disc, a #66 2X14" plow, Bush Hog 286 mower (since replaced by a 296 in the Bush Hog line) a #39 MF planter and a Deere #70 planter.

    Power wise, it handles a 6' tiller with relative ease, has many times handles a baler w/ wagon in tow, 100+ bales on the wagon, and has on occasion pulled a 3X12" plow or 8'10" disc.















  10. #10
    Super Member Farmwithjunk's Avatar
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    Default Re: New member- old tractor

    Quote Originally Posted by WarrenF
    As one OLD mechanic told me. All of those Perkins leaked oil. That is unless you are Farmwithjunk...then you rebuild it to make it better than new....LOLOL.

    It looks very pretty to me, but I am partial to the "older" tractors.
    Mine has had a few incidental leaks along the way. It's a matter of finding them and tightening things up a bit usually. Gasket technology has advanced a bit since these things were new.

    Just start with the most obvious ones and work your way along until you have a leak-free motor.

    Especially true with a MultiPower machine, so long as there isn't heavy leaking coming from under the bellhousing/transmission area, things aren't hopeless. (Tranny oil under a MP tractor usually indicates seals gone in MP unit. No leaking is generally a GOOD sign that the MP problem ISN'T anything too serious) Next time I'm in the area, I'll get a picture of my wifes little brother's 165 Massey. It's a loader tractor on a pig farm. I doubt it's seen "clean" in 40 years. It's a MultiPower tractor that has over 10,000 hours WHEN THE TACH/HOUR METER QUIT, and is STILL going strong. And that's after he's raised 6 sons through their teens.
    There are three kinds of men;
    1.) The ones that learn by reading
    2.) The few who learn by observation
    3.) The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.

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