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  1. #1
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    Default Help identify my fathers Massey

    This tractor has been in the family for many years.
    In it's early life, it towed a square bailer locally.
    I think every teen male I was related to spent a few summers bailing with it, including myself.

    It's last years were spent at my Dads place, dragging logs from the woods, and towing a utility trailer to the house with firewood.

    About 2 years ago, he was having some tire problems and decided to put new rubber on all for corners. This also included new/used wheels due to massive rust eat through.

    2 weeks later, pulling it out of the barn, its back broke.

    Dad ended up getting a new JD, and says it time to part with the old Massey.

    My job, is to find info and list it.
    Any info/help in identifying would surely be appreciated.


    (clickable thumbnails)



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  2. #2
    Veteran Member Nasty135's Avatar
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    Default Re: Help identify my fathers Massey

    Will, What a shame That is a massey harris-ferguson 50hp

    It is the in between years before Harris dropped out of the deal early to mid 50's .... The tractor looks the same as a Massey 50 ...You could probably find a carcass with a bad motor and make one out of the two...with a little work...
    Boy I would love to have the tires and wheels off of her But your a little far away, just my luck..

  3. #3
    Super Member Farmwithjunk's Avatar
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    Default Re: Help identify my fathers Massey

    Quote Originally Posted by Willl
    This tractor has been in the family for many years.
    In it's early life, it towed a square bailer locally.
    I think every teen male I was related to spent a few summers bailing with it, including myself.

    It's last years were spent at my Dads place, dragging logs from the woods, and towing a utility trailer to the house with firewood.

    About 2 years ago, he was having some tire problems and decided to put new rubber on all for corners. This also included new/used wheels due to massive rust eat through.

    2 weeks later, pulling it out of the barn, its back broke.

    Dad ended up getting a new JD, and says it time to part with the old Massey.

    My job, is to find info and list it.
    Any info/help in identifying would surely be appreciated.


    (clickable thumbnails)



    Plate


    Broken back

    That's a Massey Harris 50. When Massey Harris and Ferguson merged, There was a tractor already on the drawing board over at Ferguson. Actually 2 tractors were in the works. The venerable TO-35 was already in pre-production testing when the merger took place. Plans for a bigger tractor were brewing. That would have been known as the TO-65. It would have been a 50 HP range model. So the story goes, Harry Ferguson was opposed to building a bigger tractor. Sales and engineering people at Ferguson insisted they needed to keep pace with the horsepower war that was on in the industry. Ferguson wanted to stay with tractors the size of the 35. When the merger happened, plans changed. The TO-65 was put on simmer for a while. Some of it's components were canibalized and added to the 35 series, becoming the F-40 when sold at existing Ferguson dealers, and the Massey Harris 50 when sold at existing Massey Harris vendors. (Harry got his way to an extent with the F-40) The plan was at first to keep the dealers (and the tractors badging) seperate. They were sold that way in very late 1955 (as 1956 models) all of 1956, and early in to 1957, when the brands were combined in to one name. MASSEY FERGUSON. At that point, the Ferguson F-40 and the Massey Harris 50 both became the Massey Ferguson 50. Then the "65" was finally introduced as the Masssey Ferguson 65. (A side note, If the Ferguson/ Massey Harris badging would have continued, the Massey Harris rendition of the 65 would have been tagged the "Massey Harris 75".)

    In the final overview, the F-40 (and its cousin MH50) became the last tractor design influenced by Harry Ferguson. He refused to have anything to do with the design of the 65.

    The 40/50 was essentially the same power train as a 35. Same engine, same transmission, same rear end, same hydraulics. The difference was the front end and hood. The 40/50 used a row crop front axle that was intended for the 65. It used the 65's steering, cooling system, hood and fuel tank, and dash board. Those changes made the 40/50 about 400 lbs heavier (than the 35), about 10" longer, and enabled it to carry enough gas (diesel version wasn't available until MF 50) to stay in the field an entire work day without stopping to re-fuel. Power steering was an option on the 40/50.

    The F-40 and the MH 50 were ALMOST the same tractor. Paint was different obviously. F-40's were beige and green, then beige and silver. MH 50's were bronze and red. When the MF 50 hit the dealers, it was then painted the familiar Flint grey metalic and red that Massey STILL uses today. That was mid-season, 1957. The F-40 had it's own sheet metal. Different grill and different hood. The MH 50 had it's own grill and hood. (They were very simular in appearance, but none the less different) When the MF 50 was introduced, the grill and hood took on a bit of each models design.

    Mechanically, they are all about the same. Only real apprieciable difference will be the carb. F-40's MH 50's and VERY early MF 50's had a Carter carb that was replaced by 1958 with a MS carb. Kits for that early Carter carb are somewhat hard to get ahold of.

    The F-40, MH 50, and MF 50 were available in "standard" (24" or 28" rear rubber), "high arch" (with 38" rear rubber) Some "high arch" models had narrow fronts, both single or double wheels. Sometime in 1958, the MF 50 became available with the Perkins AD3-152 3-cylinder diesel. That engine became legendary. Variants still roll off the line some 50 years later. All the early 40/50's had a Continental 4-cylinder gas engine that was/is about indestructable. Those gassers are rated at 32 PTO HP.

    I've got a 1956 F-40 and a 1957 MF 50. (serial # on my MF 50 indicates it was probably built in first few days of their production. #43)

    For some odd reason, the F-40 is a sought after collectors tractor, the MF 50 is still VERY popular, and the MH 50 is considered an oddity and not very valuable. I find that so odd because, like I've eluded to, IT'S THE SAME TRACTOR!

    The F-40/MH 50/MF 50 series went on to become the MF 150 when the 100 series was introduced in 1965. I'm a firm believer that the 150, bigger brother to the immortal 135, was the best utility tractor EVER built. And it's roots are firmly planted in that MH 50.

    Some day, when I'm finally done restoring the F-40 (bought new by my father) and the MF 50 (bought new by my uncle [dads brother]) I'd like to have a MH 50 to complete the set. I'm 98% done with restoration on my MF 150 I bought new in 1971.

    You should be able to find a replacement "lift cover" for that MH 50. It will be the same as a TO-35, F-40, MH-50, MF 50, MF-35, and I believe the MF 65. A few $$$ will bring it back to the land of the living. In usable condition, that tractor brought here to Kentucky would snag between $2000 and $3500. In MINT condition, MAYBE $4500. You should be able to buy a lift cover for around $150 to $400 in good working order.

    Hope this answers most of your questions.
    Last edited by Farmwithjunk; 10-21-2006 at 01:13 AM.
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    2.) The few who learn by observation
    3.) The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.

  4. #4
    Silver Member JJ. in B.C.'s Avatar
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    Default Re: Help identify my fathers Massey

    That 1955 MH 50 looks like it needs a little more than the lift cover, looks like the whole pump housing is cracked right down each side !!! All the rest looks in good shape , i would seriously consider restoring it. JJ

  5. #5
    Super Member Farmwithjunk's Avatar
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    Default Re: Help identify my fathers Massey

    Quote Originally Posted by JJ. in B.C.
    That 1955 MH 50 looks like it needs a little more than the lift cover, looks like the whole pump housing is cracked right down each side !!! All the rest looks in good shape , i would seriously consider restoring it. JJ
    Upon further review.....

    I didn't notice the split running down towards the PTO shifter/inspection plate. YEP.... Needs entire rear end. That's STILL the same housing as the 35 and 40/50. Should be able to find a junker 35 for cheap somewhere.
    There are three kinds of men;
    1.) The ones that learn by reading
    2.) The few who learn by observation
    3.) The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Help identify my fathers Massey

    Wow FWJ, you really know your Massey's.

    Putting location differences aside, what's a fair price ?
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  7. #7
    Super Member Farmwithjunk's Avatar
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    Default Re: Help identify my fathers Massey

    Quote Originally Posted by Willl
    Wow FWJ, you really know your Massey's.

    Putting location differences aside, what's a fair price ?
    I was just looking over a few Massey FErguson 50's listed on various classifieds on the 'net. Most bring upwards of $4500. F-40's go for slightly more. I watched closely as a Massey Harris 50 recently sold on EBAY for just shy of $4000. I don't recall where it was located though. (Seems like upper midwest???) Those were "take 'em home and start using them" condition.

    I'd say that MH50 with rear end housing replaced would bag $3000 to 3500 at the right time of the year. (From now 'till early spring that would be quite a bit less. Maybe $2500 to $3000) Without changing rear casting, I would expect you'd be hard pressed to get $1000.

    IF THAT TRACTOR WAS MINE...... I'd start looking for a Ferguson 30/35/40, Massey Ferguson 35/50/65, or Massey Harris 50 with a bad engine or worse, then swap rear ends. Use any parts from your existing rear end that are better than donor tractor. That would include doing the work yourself. If you have to buy the parts AND pay a shop, you'll be well over tractors worth when done.

    Otherwise, be ready for $500 to $1000 offers at best.

    If it was here, I'd offer $750 as is.

    I grew up on Fergusons and Massey Fergusons. I lived in an area predominantly Deere and IH. Just us "small farm" kids had Massey and Ford. When one grows up "different" than every one else, you better know your opponents and know your own game or be prepared to take a LOT of abuse from peers. I had to know my Masseys to keep my friends in check.

    Here's what that MH 50 evolved in to!
    Attached Images Attached Images
    There are three kinds of men;
    1.) The ones that learn by reading
    2.) The few who learn by observation
    3.) The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.

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