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  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    2
    Location
    Georgetown, ca
    Tractor
    S370D

    Default s370d

    Hello there. I am just joining the forum and have a satoh s370d with fel, tiller and box scraper. I have much to learn as I never had a diesel before. Sorry if I ask dumb question. Please bare with me till I get acquainted with it all.

    Just acquired this neat little tractor and wish to service it before using it too much. I purchased rotella T oil but do not see a listing on the container for "Diesel use" or for the required formula listing in my manual for "cc,cd". will this work ok ?

    Could not find the specific location in my manual for the trans filter. I believe it is on the left side of the tractor but so far do not see it. I believe it can be cleaned and reused ?

    Will the Fuel filter replacement require me to air bleed the fuel lines ?

    The front reduction gear housing I believe will use standard ep #80 gear oil but am confused as to the reason there seems to be a grease zert at the junction of the reduction gear box and the diff. What is it greasing and is it intermingling with the gear oil used in the gear box and the diff ?

    How durable it the factory tiller ? I have tough ground with many rocks and don't know if it will handle it very well. I do expect some carnage but it seems to be a very strong unit.

    Any comments at all will be happy to receive,

    Thank you, Bill

  2. #2
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,438
    Location
    Southern California
    Tractor
    International Harvester 284, Yanmar 1401D, Yanmar 240, and others...many others...

    Default Re: s370d

    Welcome to the forums. You will find the people here knowledgeable and friendly. Congratulations on your purchase, too!

    The CC and CD ratings are obsolete, replaced by CJ and a couple other C_ specifications that elude me at the moment, I think CG, CH, and CI with some numbers behind them. The Rotella T oil is diesel rated, so you will be fine. It seems like they are CJ4 rated, a diesel specification. Most people run 15W40, but the 5W40 synthetic is fine too. Especially in warmer climates, there is justification to use straight 30 or 40 weight oils.

    The transmission filter will he cleanable metal screen. Follow the larger tube from the hydraulic pump back to the transmission housing. It will be behind a plate somewhere there.

    When you change the fuel filter, you will need to bleed the fuel lines. The fuel filter assembly will have two screws on top of the metal casting. Open them one at a time until clear fuel with no air bubbles comes out. You can probably get away just doing that, but I usually bleed the line to the injector pump just in case. There is another bleeder screw there. Just open it until no air bubbles come out. This one makes a bigger mess if you don't need to bleed it, because you have to purge all the fuel in the line between the filter bowl before any bubbles can be removed, and often there isn't any air in the first place. The result is usually an ounce or two all over the ground, whether it needs to be or not. If you don't bleed it, though, and the machine slowly dies while running it a few minutes later, you should have. Re-bleed the system and you're ready to go.

    I run a GL4 gear oil in my front axles. I'm not sure if any tractors of this vintage have bushings that may be attacked by some of the GL5 gear oils or not, so I just find a GL4 compatible one in case they do. Some people run the same hydraulic fluid as in the transmission. I like gear oil because it doesn't leak as fast through 30 year old seals when cold... The wrong reason to make that decision, but there it is.

    I don't know which grease zero you mean, but just grease it. There is one on the axle pivot, I think, and then some on the kingpins and steering linkages, on some machines. I don't have an S370. But just grease it, it won't do any harm.

    I wouldn't use a tiller in rocky or unbroken ground. I would at least rip it first, and pick out as many rocks as I could. I don't like to break new ground with the tiller. Put the ripper shanks into your box scraper and tear up your ground first. Then pick all the rocks out you can, at least to tennis ball size. I wouldn't want to hit even golf ball sized rocks with mine.

    Do you have any pictures of your machine? We love pictures.

  3. #3
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    2
    Location
    Georgetown, ca
    Tractor
    S370D

    Default Re: s370d

    thanks so much for the quick response, your great. Is this gl4 as easy to find as the gl5 ??

  4. #4
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    68
    Location
    CENTRAL VA USA
    Tractor
    Satoh Beaver s-370d

    Default

    Gl4 is not full synthetic. Most of the time it is semi synthetic. I have never had trouble finding it at the local Advance Auto or Auto Zone.
    S-370 Beaver named by my wife: "the shetland pony"
    My dad's that I have to keep running: MF 35, MF 165 FEL

    gone but not forgotten: Kubota L3400 FEL, MF 65 High crop, MF135, Super A, IH 140, IH 364, IH 504, '48 Allis Chalmers G, 2N, 9N, Case 580CK backhoe.

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