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  1. #11
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    85
    Location
    Fulton, KY
    Tractor
    Montana R4944HST

    Default Re: Tire Ballast

    The big problem I would have with methanol is that is is highly flammable and the flames are invisible. I really don't like the idea of having such a thing sloshing around in my tires.

    I don't do a lot of heavy-duty loader work, but when I do I just always have an implement hanging off the back - either my finish mower (which stays on most of the summer) or my box blade. The 500-800lbs hanging off of the 3-point, which is a good couple feet further behind the center of gravity of the tractor than the rear wheels, seems to offer a pretty good ballast to the weight at the front.
    Big Charlie

    Yankee by birth, Southern by the Grace of God

  2. #12
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    3,055
    Location
    Windham County, Conn
    Tractor
    Ford 2120 , New Holland TN75D, Hitachi UH083LC Excavator

    Default Re: Tire Ballast

    As far as I know from experience and the recommendations several tractor manufactures is that the equilavent loading you need between tire loading, wheel weights and 3 pt hitch weight needs to be equal to the max amount you want to lift with the loader. The wheel weights and loading fluid are multipled by 1 and the 3 pt hitch weight is multiplied by 1.5 to account for the leverage effect. For example if you have 1000 lb wheel loading and 800 lbs of 3 pt hitch weight you can safely carry 1000 lb plus 1.5 x 800 or 2200 lbs with your loader. Many people on this board run and talk about improperly balasted tractors.

    Andy

  3. #13
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    1,924
    Location
    NH seacoast & Coos County
    Tractor
    Kioti DK45S

    Default Re: Tire Ballast

    Quote Originally Posted by dry_creek_farm
    Supposedly the anti-freeze will not attack the rubber or steel rim (cooling systems have rubber hoses and cast iron engine blocks) as long as you change out the mixture every 3-5 years.
    Rather than change out the antifreeze you can additives to restore the corrosion resistance at any automotive store. Here's Antifreeze Recycling some interesting antifreeze info. MikeD74T

  4. #14
    Silver Member Racer71's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    240
    Location
    Peyton, CO
    Tractor
    Kubota L3400 HST

    Default Re: Tire Ballast

    I just bought a L3400. I lifted a load of dirt at the dealer along with the rear tires. I added calcium. The dealer had tubes installed to protect the rims from the calcium. This made a big difference. I don't like having anything on the 3 point when I do bucket work. It is a clearance thing. Both tires filled with tubes was around $220.
    Colorado Stan
    Kubota L3400HST, FEL, Rear Blade, Box Blade, Snow Blower, Brush Mower, Tooth Bar, Ballast Block, Still looking?

  5. #15
    New Member dry_creek_farm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    11
    Location
    Berthoud, CO
    Tractor
    2007 Montana 5740C and 1942 Farmall Model M - Wide Front

    Default Re: Tire Ballast

    Quote Originally Posted by 2manyrocks
    I asked my local coop about filling tires. They said they use methanol instead of antifreeze because it's not as bad for the environment when it finally leaks out.
    Your comment got me thinking. Here is the skinny from the MSDS sheet:
    Not as bad for the environment as I thought.

    12. Ecological Information
    Environmental Fate:
    When released into the soil, this material is expected to readily biodegrade. When released into the soil, this material is expected to leach into groundwater. When released into water, this material is expected to readily biodegrade. When released into the air, this material is expected to be readily degraded by reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals. When released into the air, this material is expected to have a half-life between 1 and 10 days.
    Environmental Toxicity:
    No information found.
    Eric

    Berthoud, CO

  6. #16
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    145
    Location
    Central New York
    Tractor
    Farmtrac 270DTC

    Default Re: Tire Ballast

    Quote Originally Posted by dry_creek_farm
    I've got the tires on my Montana filled with a 50/50 mixture of standard anti-freeze.

    Supposedly the anti-freeze will not attack the rubber or steel rim (cooling systems have rubber hoses and cast iron engine blocks) as long as you change out the mixture every 3-5 years.
    My dealer recommends inserting tubes prior to filling tires. His logic is that it is possible that a tire can be punctured without the tube being damaged (thereby retaining all fluid) and it is worth the $30 investment for the additional protection. Me thinks he may be right. Me knows he is a good salesman, however.

    My understanding is that ethylene glycol (antifreeze) is risky should there be a spill, if small animals are around, as it is lethal in small amounts and they are attracted by the sweet taste. Windshield washer fluid (ethanol mix) appears to be a safer option.
    Farmtrac 270DTC w/5040 Loader, Bush Hog SBX600 Box Scraper

  7. #17
    Veteran Member Redbug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    1,934
    Location
    Columbia, SC
    Tractor
    Kubota L3830HST

    Default Re: Tire Ballast

    I have unloaded tires on my kubota L3830. I figured sooner or later I would puncture a tire or two and have a mess if they were loaded. I plug my own tires, (on my atv, cars, truck), and a plug would probably work on filled tires, providing you don't have inner tubes installed, though.

    However...I always keep my box blade with extra weight on the 3 point, (800 lbs) or another implement attached and have wheel weights installed, (300 lbs). The combination of the two weight types works well for me and I can lift a full load all the way up in the 4in1. I keep about 40 psi in the front tires, and 8 psi in the R4 rears, (so the tire is not rounded and the whole tread lays fairly flat for max traction and wear).

    Andy...That's a good tip...(The wheel weights and loading fluid are multipled by 1 and the 3 pt hitch weight is multiplied by 1.5 to account for the leverage effect). I did not know that...and thinking about it...seems absolutely correct. I know the bucket weight and cu/ft capacity and also a good estimate of the soil weight. It adds up pretty close in real life.
    Dave

    "If your sport does not put grease, blood, or dirt under your fingernails, then it's just a game!"

  8. #18
    Gold Member rcowan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    261
    Location
    SE Arizona
    Tractor
    Montana 2740M

    Default Re: Tire Ballast

    Hey RedBug where did you get the wheel weights?

    RC

    Quote Originally Posted by Redbug View Post

    However...I always keep my box blade with extra weight on the 3 point, (800 lbs) or another implement attached and have wheel weights installed, (300 lbs).
    The problem with Socialism is that you eventually run out of the other guys money.

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