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  1. #11
    Elite Member zzvyb6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    2,562
    Location
    michigan
    Tractor
    jd 1070

    Default Re: new holland bale wagons

    My 1012 do NOT have the tie off feature. I presume you mean that in order to have a very stable stack when unloading, you switch the 4th or 5th tier around to crosslink bales with those of the other layers. I watch/count the slices from the first table and when I feel like it, I stop and rearrange a few bales that keeps the entire stack together. This is only when I deliver to a customer on the road who has a garage for a barn. She and her kids then have some fun knocking the stack down to put it in their loft. For my own barn I bring in 56 on the wagon and another 8 - 10 on the first table and dump them in front of the elevator helter skelter. As a result, I'm in and out in the time it takes to roll the rear forks forward to accept another load (60 seconds). Other models (with higher numbers) have a feature to perform the cross tie automatically when the operator wants it done.

    Yes my rig goes thru a 10' high sliding door. This is necessary when I have a customer coming for the hay (usually the next day) and I keep 40 to 70 for them on the stacker and inside my shed (which uses 10' sheets of T1-11 for the door panels). This also works out when you are watching the weather. I could dump the stack in the shed if I wanted to avoid the elevator, and can reload the stack with my model, but I would have to lower the platform to exit the shed.

    Maintenance consists of replacing a few rusty steel hydraulic lines with rubber, replacing the steel cable in the table rack, and blowing the chaff out of the chains and levers and sensors with a leaf blower after each cutting. Chaff buildup can prevent the 1st table sensor from recognizing that its full.

    It was a bit tricky to pick up bales going around corners but you get the hang of it pretty quick. I added a hydraulic chute lift to it. This helps you shake a bale loose from the chute if you get a wet or loose one stuck in it. I add a few quarts of oil to the reservoir as necessay. When you raise the stack, some oil sometime squirts out of the cylinder breather probably because of a worn seal.

    I want the stacks to tip over in my case. Don't want anybody getting hit (people or dogs). The 'reward' for a bale coming loose from the stacker or the elevator and hitting someone (must be a head shot) is a full glass of Jim Beam (no ice, maybe a shot of water added).

    I have a pretty severe side hill that bales sometime even tumble down when exiting the baler. No problem with my stacker, though. I added some 2x4 on the edges of the first table to keep them in place on the hill. If the load off the first table comes forward at you when going downhill. that can be a problem. Its easliy solved by adjusting the table lift stop lever to push it further onto the rack. I don't have a problem with uneven bale lengths as long as they fit onto the first table as a pair. Thats a baler issue, not a stacker problem. The only real problem I have is on 2nd or third cutting when the bales can get too heavy. If I forget to adjust the bale tension, they can come out 150# and I never know it until its time to put them up the elevator. That's lost profit as well as possible mold or back problems. My customers like a "light" bale to make it easy to throw up into their barns or trucks.

    It does take some mechanical awareness. Baler and rake are offset to the right. But the stacker is loading from the left. That means knowing how to go thru gates, driveways, shed doors etc. without bending something. With a stack wagon, the ideal hay field is about 1/4 mile long and 20' wide cul de sac. That gives you a full stack in a down and back operation and done for the day. It works out for mowing, raking and baling, too. Yes Mom can run it. Doesn't take much power at all but there is a large tongue load. I towed it home on the back of a Suburban. It was on hard on the bump stops.
    There is no "I" in team, but there is a "Me" if you want to jumble it up a bit...

  2. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    27
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Tractor
    JD 2640

    Default Re: new holland bale wagons

    Thanks guys. Any tips for looking at used wagons? Im thinking a 1037 or 1038.

    Gotta tell ya the thought of not unloading and stacking bales all summer sounds pretty good to me.

  3. #13
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    488
    Location
    TX

    Default Re: new holland bale wagons

    Quote Originally Posted by zzvyb6 View Post
    I added a hydraulic chute lift to it. This helps you shake a bale loose from the chute if you get a wet or loose one stuck in it.
    I saw a picture of yours in a post once and it looked like you added wheels to the chute. I thought about doing that to mine long ago but was told that they cause more problems than they're worth in sandy or wet soil conditions. You're the first person I've seen actually do it. How well do they work?

  4. #14
    Elite Member zzvyb6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    2,562
    Location
    michigan
    Tractor
    jd 1070

    Default Re: new holland bale wagons

    I put a single caster wheel on the front of the chute so that the hydraulic lift can be put in a float position and the chute then follows the ground. Its a pneumatic caster from TSC that swivels on a ball bearing bracket. I welded a bracket on the chute and bolted the assembly on it. Works just fine at my place. I tend to stay out of the swamp and sand dunes. You can always regulated the height with the hydraulics. This setup is a ground follower and works especially on the hills and swells in my back property where there are still some plow furrows etc. Good height control means good bale accumulation, no more chute digging in, and no broken or stuck bales. That means no more jumping off the tractor to help snag a bale or to clear a broken one that got hung up under the chute. I think the pneumatic tire on the wheel would work pretty well in firm sand. I did not care for all that weight suspended off the side of the wagon's frame.
    There is no "I" in team, but there is a "Me" if you want to jumble it up a bit...

  5. #15
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    488
    Location
    TX

    Default Re: new holland bale wagons

    Interesting solution. I've never really had to deal with hills on my place (or my old place)...it's all flat. The guy that bought mine today has some changes in elevation (I wouldn't really call them hills) and I told him about your wheel.

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