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  1. #1
    New Member
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    Nov 2007
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    11
    Location
    s.w florida
    Tractor
    N.H. tc35da

    Default more power

    is their any aftermarket add on's to get more power out of the engine and the FEL. I bought a computer tuner for my diesel truck that adds 225 hp & its getting 1.5 -2.0 mpg better than stock. can these tractors be tuned like this. BTW its a 05 tc35 da.. thanks in advance

  2. #2
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    84
    Location
    Northeast PA - an hour from everywhere
    Tractor
    Ford 1700, IH 2500A

    Default Re: more power

    I don't know specificaly about your tractor, but my diesel 1700 is all mechanical, compared to your electronicly controlled truck.

    My Dodge Cummins truck is also older and mechanical, I've "bumped the pump" changed the intake and exhaust and replaced injectors with larger ones - all improved truck performance. BUT I have not ventured any such changes to my diesel tractor, and have no idea if they would work at all.

    Bob
    Second career/hobby farmer: horses, chickens, haying.
    Ford 1700 4wd, Bush Hog loader, brush hog, Ford finish mower, Meyers snowplow adapted to FEL.
    7' rear blade, landscape rake
    IH 2500A hydrostatic drive, IH mower, IH hay rake, NH66 baler, APRS 728 backhoe.
    I take the team into the field and down the road. Enjoy my shop time.

  3. #3
    Elite Member dfkrug's Avatar
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    Feb 2004
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    4,662
    Location
    NorCal
    Tractor
    05 Kioti CK30HST w/ Prairie Dog backhoe

    Default Re: more power

    I think a small turbocharger would be a great approach. Keep
    the boost under 10psi and intercooling won't be necessary. No
    ignition or timing issues....just fabbing a manifold. Prob good
    for 25% at 10psi.

    The FEL's forces are limited by the relief valve. You can increase
    the hyd pressure by adjusting it, up to what press the tractor
    implement pump delivers. But the designers of your FEL may not
    think it can handle the additional forces. You can also buy
    larger diameter boom cylinders....same issue.

  4. #4
    New Member
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    Nov 2007
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    11
    Location
    s.w florida
    Tractor
    N.H. tc35da

    Default Re: more power

    where would i look for the relief valve to adjust the fel psi? is it internal?

  5. #5
    Elite Member RobJ's Avatar
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    Jul 2005
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    3,471
    Location
    Spring, TX (Houston)
    Tractor
    Kubota L2500

    Default Re: more power

    Quote Originally Posted by diesel red neck
    where would i look for the relief valve to adjust the fel psi? is it internal?
    Add shims to the pop off ball spring. It's usually in the control lever area.
    L2500

  6. #6
    Elite Member RobJ's Avatar
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    Jul 2005
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    3,471
    Location
    Spring, TX (Houston)
    Tractor
    Kubota L2500

    Default Re: more power

    Quote Originally Posted by dfkrug
    I think a small turbocharger would be a great approach. Keep
    the boost under 10psi and intercooling won't be necessary. No
    ignition or timing issues....
    IMO you would have ignition and time issuses. For one you would need to change the injection pump settings. More air needs more fuel. I'll just pulled my quick reference for the diesel I used to work on and the turbos run about 4-5 degrees earlier than the natural.

    Not much but something to consider. Personally if you need more power, buy a bigger tractor!
    L2500

  7. #7
    Epic Contributor
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    jinman's Avatar
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    Feb 2001
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    21,014
    Location
    Texas - Wise County - Sunset
    Tractor
    NHTC45D, NH LB75B, Ford Jubilee

    Default Re: more power

    Quote Originally Posted by diesel red neck
    is their any aftermarket add on's to get more power out of the engine and the FEL. I bought a computer tuner for my diesel truck that adds 225 hp & its getting 1.5 -2.0 mpg better than stock. can these tractors be tuned like this. BTW its a 05 tc35 da.. thanks in advance
    No is the answer. Now, I'll give you the reasons. If you raise your engine hp to 50, you will gain nothing at the wheels. The PTO will have more power, but the FEL will be exactly the same.

    Both the HST transmission and the hydraulics on your tractor are "governed" by relief valves. The HST relief valve is the same for all the Class IIIs. Your TC35 has the same transmission relief valve as the TC40DA and TC45DA. When the transmission develops 5000 psi, it goes into relief...period...end of story.

    The main hydraulic system for the 3PH and FEL is adjustable. It has a relief valve on the right side underneath the operator's platform. It's a square block with several lines going into and out of it. It's called a "diverter valve" and is used to divert fluid to the FEL if one is installed. It also contains the system relief that sets the power to the 3PH and FEL. That relief on your tractor is 2350 psi. On the TC40 and TC45 tractors, the relief pressure is set to 2500 psi, and that's why they can lift more at the 3PH and FEL than you can.

    Can you change the pressure so that your hydraulic system has a higher pressure? Sure you can. Your NH dealer has a shim kit to do just that. By adding shims to the relief valve, you can increase the pressure to 2500 psi and maybe even higher. I strongly don't recommend doing this until all your warranty is gone. Since you have an '05, I'd say the warranty is expired and if you blow the hydraulics up now, all you'll get is wet and wiser. As you can tell, I'm not a fan of doing this (going higher than 2500 psi, that is). I have a TC45D and I've checked my pressure. It's 2500 psi and that's where it is going to stay for as long as I own my tractor.

    So, I'd recommend not messing with the engine, but if you want to carefully raise your hydraulic pressure to just 2500 psi, you will probably get away with it. I strongly don't recommend going any higher than that.
    Jim


  8. #8
    Elite Member dfkrug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    4,662
    Location
    NorCal
    Tractor
    05 Kioti CK30HST w/ Prairie Dog backhoe

    Default Re: more power

    Quote Originally Posted by RobJ
    IMO you would have ignition and time issuses. For one you would need to change the injection pump settings. More air needs more fuel. I'll just pulled my quick reference for the diesel I used to work on and the turbos run about 4-5 degrees earlier than the natural.

    Not much but something to consider. Personally if you need more power, buy a bigger tractor!
    Well, of course, there is always buying a bigger tractor......

    As for injection timing, sure the "ideal" setting would not be the same,
    AND, higher flow injectors and/or higher injection pressure would
    optimize for the additional air flow. My point is that at low turbo
    pressures (under 10psi), you get a significant power gain without
    doing anything else. I hope someone tries it and reports here, as there
    have been several posters threatening to do the same.

  9. #9
    Elite Member dfkrug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    4,662
    Location
    NorCal
    Tractor
    05 Kioti CK30HST w/ Prairie Dog backhoe

    Default Re: more power

    Quote Originally Posted by jinman
    No is the answer. Now, I'll give you the reasons. If you raise your engine hp to 50, you will gain nothing at the wheels. The PTO will have more power, but the FEL will be exactly the same.
    Power to the wheels thru a HST is a function of pressure (fixed by
    relief valve) AND volume. A higher hp engine WILL produce more hp
    at the wheels with no change in relief pressure, as it will be able to
    deliver higher hydraulic flow before bogging down. HP is for doing things
    quickly; forces stay the same.

  10. #10
    Epic Contributor
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    jinman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
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    21,014
    Location
    Texas - Wise County - Sunset
    Tractor
    NHTC45D, NH LB75B, Ford Jubilee

    Default Re: more power

    Quote Originally Posted by dfkrug
    Power to the wheels thru a HST is a function of pressure (fixed by
    relief valve) AND volume. A higher hp engine WILL produce more hp
    at the wheels with no change in relief pressure, as it will be able to
    deliver higher hydraulic flow before bogging down. HP is for doing things
    quickly; forces stay the same.
    Dave, a higher hp engine will produce no more flow and no more power to the wheels than a lower hp engine if their rpm is the same. If the engine bogs down on a lower hp engine, of course it will produce less flow. But if the lower powered engine does not bog down, you cannot gain anything by increasing hp. That is the case with our tractors. If the TC35DA cannot maintain rpm and the engine bogs down, then there is something to be gained by increasing hp. If the engine has plenty of power to put the HST transmission into bypass without bogging down, then a 50 hp engine will get you nothing.

    I own a TC45D and I cannot use nearly all the torque and hp of that engine through the transmission. And if I'm in a situation where all wheels are spinning and I'm not making progress, all the power in the world won't make it any better without more traction. If I was wanting to turbo-charge a TC35, I'd go get a gear tractor and figure how to get more traction at the wheels. Maybe dual rears or increasing weight. A TC35DA with HST transmission is a bad, bad choice of tractors for an engine hp increase of any significant amount.

    If I wanted to do a turbo, I think I'd take the TC35DA down to a NH dealer and trade it in on a TC48. Then I'd turbo the TC48 to get the power of the TC55. The gear driven transmission will produce much more satisfactory results.
    Jim


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