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  1. #1
    Member Fanlo2300's Avatar
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    Aug 2010
    Posts
    26
    Location
    Quebec Canada
    Tractor
    Case IH DX33

    Default Hydraulic GPM from DX33 (TC33D)

    I am considering adding a wood splitter on my DX33 (same as TC33D).

    The specs for this tractor show a "Hydraulic Lift System Pump Capacity" of 7.6 USGPM.

    Does it mean that I get this flow at the attachment connectors ? Or do I have to substract from this flow the power steering end other hydraulics ?

    Thank you for you expertise...

  2. #2
    Veteran Member Jerry/MT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    1,963
    Location
    Western Montana
    Tractor
    New Holland TD95D, Ford 4610 & Ferguson TO-30

    Default Re: Hydraulic GPM from DX33 (TC33D)

    Quote Originally Posted by Fanlo2300 View Post
    I am considering adding a wood splitter on my DX33 (same as TC33D).

    The specs for this tractor show a "Hydraulic Lift System Pump Capacity" of 7.6 USGPM.

    Does it mean that I get this flow at the attachment connectors ? Or do I have to substract from this flow the power steering end other hydraulics ?

    Thank you for you expertise...
    I'm not familiar with the specifics of your tractor but generally speaking, the steerring pump is separae from the main pump. and is rated separately. It alsohas smaller capacity. If I'm wrong, perhaps Jinman will correct me. He has a TC33 and knows them well.

  3. #3
    Silver Member thclimer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    182
    Location
    North East NY
    Tractor
    TC33D

    Default Re: Hydraulic GPM from DX33 (TC33D)

    I have a TC33D and was considering a wood splitter for it at one point. Here are some thoughts I considered when I was trying to decide.

    While I don't remember the specifics about the flow rate required for a log splitter I believe our 33D can do it but the travel time to split through a log and then reverse for the next log would be relatively long.

    There is also the cost to consider. I decided to purchase a gas-powered splitter for about $1,200. From what I remember it will cost you that much, or more for rear remotes and the hydraulic splitter for your tractor.

    The gas splitter I purchased can be used vertical and horizontal position. By having a separate splitter it gives me the independence of using the tractor's FEL to bring wood to the splitter. By setting the FEL to waist level and using the splitter in the horizontal position I'm able to slide logs from it onto the splitter without bending over. I can then put them back into the FEL or onto a pile without bending over.

    The other point is do you really want to run your big 33 Hp diesel engine to drive a log splitter. What ware and tare are you putting on it rather than a cheaper to maintain/run gas powered splitter.

    The gas-powered splitter is way more portable than your tractor. You can let your neighbor's borrow the splitter without loosing the use of your tractor.

  4. #4
    Super Member RickB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
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    7,038
    Location
    Eastern NY
    Tractor
    Case 885, JD 730D, Ford 4000

    Default Re: Hydraulic GPM from DX33 (TC33D)

    Quote Originally Posted by thclimer View Post
    You can let your neighbor's borrow the splitter .
    Best reason NOT to buy a gas-powered splitter.
    We have too much gun control.
    What we need is more idiot control.

  5. #5
    Epic Contributor jinman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    20,948
    Location
    Texas - Wise County - Sunset
    Tractor
    NHTC45D, NH LB75B, Ford Jubilee

    Default Re: Hydraulic GPM from DX33 (TC33D)

    Quote Originally Posted by Fanlo2300 View Post
    I am considering adding a wood splitter on my DX33 (same as TC33D).

    The specs for this tractor show a "Hydraulic Lift System Pump Capacity" of 7.6 USGPM.

    Does it mean that I get this flow at the attachment connectors ? Or do I have to substract from this flow the power steering end other hydraulics ?

    Thank you for you expertise...
    Your power steering is a separate system with it's own reservoir and pump. As a matter of fact, the reservoir sits right on top of the pump. I'm surprised you don't know that from doing routine maintenance.

    Your main hydraulic flow of 7.6 gpm is in a perfect world. I'd guess your flow is probably likely to end up being more like 6.5 gpm or maybe about 5 gpm which is sufficient to run your splitter. The problem is you'll have to run your tractor at 2000 to 2500 rpm to produce that full flow capability. If you run at 1500 rpm, you may find the flow reduced to a point that it is too slow if you are a fast splitter. I run my TC45D that has about 2 gpm more flow than your tractor up to 2000 rpm when splitting with my 3PH splitter. That gives me the best speed. I'm not really that fast and if it's a little slow that suits me just fine. I can tell you that with my wife and I both feeding rounds, we stay very busy with our splitter. For the price, it's hard to beat a 3PH splitter.

    BTW: Just because it's a 3PH splitter doesn't mean you have to run it that way. If you get much longer hoses, you can sit that splitter on a trailer beside the tractor and just hook up the hydraulic lines. Some people find this method more satisfactory.
    Jim


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