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  1. #1
    Bronze Member
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    Feb 2006
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    82
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    North Dakota

    Default FORD LOADER

    I know most of you guys probably have New Holland loader tractors, but I have a question about my Ford 735 Series loader. It is on my Ford 4400 and unfortunately, prior to my purchase of the tractor, someone ran this loader into a curb while doing snow removal and bent one of loader arms. As you can imagine, the loader now sits crooked. It still functions ok...not a problem there, but it is very obviously bent. The loader frame appears straight, only the RH loader arm appears to be damaged. My question is...have any of you ever had any experience in straightening a bent up loader and if so, how difficult was it? The obvious damage occurred where the gusset plate secures to the upper and lower halves of the RH loader arm.
    I have spent a considerable amount of time surfing the web in search of a replacement loader arm assembly, but unfortunately, the 735 Series loader were not sold in large numbers and in two years of looking I have only seen two other loaders like it and both were in use on serviceable tractors. The 735 Series loader apparently only fit one model of Ford tractor...the 4400. The Ford 3400 takes a lighter duty loader...the 730 Series. I have one of these also and parts do not interchange.
    My dad says just use it bent, but my plan is to restore the tractor (it is a 1972 model) and I don't want to put a bent up piece of junk on my newly restored Ford. Any ideas?

  2. #2
    Veteran Member
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    Jan 2002
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    1,561
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    South East Michigan
    Tractor
    New Holland TC30 Hydro 4x4, Gravely Zero Turn Mower

    Default Re: FORD LOADER

    I don't know how much it would cost, but it seems that if you stripped the loader down to just that arm, a big shop, like the kind that service semi trailers, should be able to press it back into something closer to the original shape.
    I'm not sure if the loader arms are heat treated or if they simply use a thick section of metal to create the necessary strength. But, I guess anything that can be bent should be able to be un-bent. (Assuming that work-hardening does'nt become an issue)


  3. #3
    Veteran Member
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    Oct 2005
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    1,432
    Location
    N. E. Ohio
    Tractor
    tc- 29d

    Default Re: FORD LOADER

    It is amazing what you can do with a torch, porta power and a chain. It seems that you will find alot of FEL's that do not sit true after time. I caught mine on a tree stump and threw it out of true level. Have a friend who does welding repairs on heavy equipment and used the above mentioned tools and got it darn close to level.

  4. #4
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
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    Central florida
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    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: FORD LOADER

    I agree.. torch.. comealong.. a couple trees.. might even grind the welds out of the gusset first to weaken the structure.. draw it up just past true. then weld it back up with a big honking lincoln ac 225

    Soundguy

  5. #5
    Bronze Member
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    Feb 2006
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    North Dakota

    Default Re: FORD LOADER

    thanks for all the input concerning this bent loader issue. Upon looking at it more closely. The upper and lower loader arms are actually a box, made from two halves welded together. The two boxes (they are not actually square but tapered) are then fastened together with the gusset. As one of you mentioned...if the gussets (one on the inside, and one on the outside) were removed by grinding off the welds, the entire assemble could possibly be straightened, then rewelded just as it was in the factory. After posting this question about the bent loader frame, I had the opportunity to tour the Case/IH/New Holland factory in Fargo, ND where they are actually building tractors and loaders. The raw pieces of iron are fastened in a jig and welded either by robot or the old fashioned way. No...I don't plan on buying one of their new tractors (the largest ones with four wheel drive and tracks costs close to $300K! I think the key here is...disassemble it, straighten what is bent, fasten it back down in some sort of a jig to keep it straight, and reweld it. That sounds easier said than done, but I think that is what it needs. I don't have a foundry at home so it may end up going to a professional.

  6. #6
    Veteran Member daTeacha's Avatar
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    Oct 2005
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    Funk, Ohio

    Default Re: FORD LOADER

    Maybe an auto body shop that can straighten frames on pickups and such could help you out if you don't find any other option.

  7. #7
    Bronze Member
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    Feb 2006
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    North Dakota

    Default Re: FORD LOADER

    Thanks for the useful info guys. I think most guys would just use it bent and say the he-- with it, but I am maybe a little too picky. I mentioned to the wife about just selling the whole rig and buying a Ford 3400 back (that would fit my 730 Series Ford FEL which is in near new condition) but she says...No...we should just keep it. Makes you all jealous..don't it?
    As soon as I get my mowing equipment ready to go...I am going to bring it in and pull the loader off of it. I found a good machine shop in Fargo (more like a blacksmith shop actually) and I can just put the entire loader on my snowmobile trailer and bring it over there and let them have a look at it. It seems like an awful lot of trouble and I would just start looking for another loader, but I already know they are near impossible to find...could take years of looking. It will no doubt cost some serious money to straighten it. Meanwhile I will fix the sheet metal on my tractor and see about getting some fresh paint.

  8. #8
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
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    Central florida
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    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: FORD LOADER

    Might be as simple as cutting the welds on the gusset, and putting a porta power to it to over correct it, bang on it a bit with a maul and heat with a torch.. then bring it to true, then re-weld the gusset... might not be as bad as you think.

    Soundguy

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