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  1. #1
    Silver Member
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    Apr 2006
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    128
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    Vermont
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    Kubota L4740 HSTC

    Default Off Road vs Home Heating

    I see lots of post, but thought I would ask. My distributor sells HHO oil as off road is ther an issue with this. Says both are #2. From my research I do not think there is any issues with this. I would be running this in a kubota L4330. Any advise is appreciated. Mike

  2. #2
    New Member
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    Dec 2005
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    17
    Location
    chillicothe, ohio
    Tractor
    new holland 675E 555E

    Default Re: Off Road vs Home Heating

    home heating fuel is same as #2 but home fuel has a tax,so it cost more,other than that same fuel
    new holland backhoes 675E 555E 1978 L9000 ford tri axle dump 1993 f700 single axle dump 2007 hudson 12tn trailer 1989cz enginering trailer A62 ford end loader

  3. #3
    Platinum Member archerynut's Avatar
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    Jan 2007
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    671
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    Near Pittsburgh, PA
    Tractor
    Looking again

    Default Re: Off Road vs Home Heating

    From what I have heard they are the same thing, no differences and no other issues that I have heard.

  4. #4
    Platinum Member
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    Sep 2004
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    583
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    south/central Va.
    Tractor
    Deutz Fahr Agrofarm 100, Stoll loader, bucket, forks & root grapple

    Default Re: Off Road vs Home Heating

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike_VT
    I see lots of post, but thought I would ask. My distributor sells HHO oil as off road is ther an issue with this. Says both are #2. From my research I do not think there is any issues with this. I would be running this in a kubota L4330. Any advise is appreciated. Mike
    I won't run HHO in my tractors because there's a difference within the #2 fuel oil in my area. I buy from a dealer that offers premium diesel fuel. And yes it's #2. And in my area it's worth the price difference.

    Last time I filled up my storage tank I paid $2.14 for premium. Another fuel supplier was running ads in the news paper for $1.79. One of my good freinds and neighbor bought 500 gal. of the $1.79 stuff the last week in Feb. He had always used the premium fuel until he saw that ad for $1.79. He also has a very large wood stove in his shop. When he'd start a fire in the mornings he'd use about 1 pint of diesel to get it going after lighting some kindling. I was there one morning and he threw some of the $1.79 oil in on the newly started fire. The fire went out. The premium fuel had always burned when he added it to the fire. Next morning was the same thing.

    My neighbor friend also runs a pretty sharp pencil. He keeps records of hours on the tractors and fuel usage. That 500 gal. of fuel ran out last week and he ran the numbers. With the $1.79 fuel he used just shy of 15% more gal. to hours than with the premium fuel. So his storage tank is full of premium fuel again.

    We also have a JD dealership in our area that will tell you up front to use premium fuel or they won't back the new tractor. If you take a new tractor in for engine problems the first thing they do is pull a fuel sample. If you want Deere to cover it, it had better have premium fuel in the tank if the problem is fuel related.

    I've seen way to many fuel pump and engine problems related to the type of fuel used to put anything other than a premium fuel in my engines. I had a new MF start blowing engine oil at 700 hrs and it came from HHM. After that I use nothing but premium fuel.

    Take notice I wrote in "my area". It may not be in your area.I'll also add we have a big timber ind. in this area. In the last few years since fuel prices have risen the most of those timber harvesters use premium fuel now. They've had to many problems and down time from lower quality diesel fuel. If you have a supplier that offers premium fuel get them to show you what they do different to make it a premium fuel. It's not just what they add to the fuel. Look at the filter system they have on the premium fuel storage tanks. My supplier also cleans those holding tanks when they are empty several times a year.

    This is from the web site of the outfit I buy fuel from.

    "Diesel

    Unlike ordinary diesel fuels, SuperGold premium diesel fuel has special additives for proven cleaner burning, economical, premium performance. By providing quicker starts, less engine wear and reduced injector deposits, SuperGold helps cut equipment downtime and lowers maintenance costs.

    Available in both a low sulfur (LS) formula for on-road use and a high sulfur (HS) for on-farm and off-road use, SuperGold gets your diesel equipment started faster and keeps it working longer with--

    * Cetane improve for quicker starts and less smoke
    * Detergency rating of Cummins L-10 Superior to reduce injector deposits
    * Better lubricity to reduce engine wear and maintenance
    * Corrosion inhibitor to protect fuel system
    * Demulsifier to keep moisture and water from mixing with fuel
    * Stabilizer/Dispersant to improve storage stability
    Charolais

  5. #5
    Super Member George2615's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    6,383
    Location
    Central Square, NY
    Tractor
    LS XR3037HC

    Default Re: Off Road vs Home Heating

    #2 off road and #2 HHO are the same thing in my area. HHO is dyed and has taxes added.

  6. #6
    Veteran Member
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    Oct 2005
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    1,536
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Tractor
    Kubota B3030

    Default Re: Off Road vs Home Heating

    Quote Originally Posted by guss
    home heating fuel is same as #2 but home fuel has a tax,so it cost more,other than that same fuel
    It has SALES TAX on it here where I am...but not "highway tax". They are identical where I am
    Kubota B3030 with 40 amp alternator kit; LA403 FEL; 60 inch backblade; sub-soiler; ballast box; EzMover hitch; Payne clamp-on bucket forks; a HD set of smaller discs and a 60" landscape rake with dolly wheels
    Hobart HH210 Mig welder

  7. #7
    Silver Member
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    Apr 2006
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    128
    Location
    Vermont
    Tractor
    Kubota L4740 HSTC

    Default Re: Off Road vs Home Heating

    Thanks for the input. I live Northern Vermont and called several gas suppliers and HHO companies and the all validated that off road and hho is the same stuff. Many indicated that this will change in the near future, but my oil delivery guy will fill my drums if I leave them out for him. So for now I am going to give it a shot, this is all for convience as the 50 cent a gallon saving will take a long time to pay off the $200 12 volt pump purchased. No all I need is an attendant.

  8. #8
    Gold Member
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    Sep 2006
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    299
    Location
    Allenton, Wis.
    Tractor
    kubota 7510 hst

    Default Re: Off Road vs Home Heating

    I would not run heating oil in my tractor because even off road has additives in diesel fuel. I'll bet they don't bother putting any additives in hho, which is always #2. In the winter in the northern states you better be running #1 cause #2 hho will gel won't it????????????? I can't see much difference in price since off road has no tax.

  9. #9
    Veteran Member
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    Dec 2006
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    Coastal Rhode Island
    Tractor
    Jinma 354, purchased 2007

    Default Re: Off Road vs Home Heating

    I'm in Rhode Island. When I get my heating tank filled the invoice says diesel and has a friendly reminder not to use it on-road.

    For me it's not so much the cost difference as the convenience factor of being able to fill up when I need to.

  10. #10
    Super Star Member
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    Apr 2001
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    11,987
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    PA
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    NH TC25D

    Default Re: Off Road vs Home Heating

    This is another topic that's been beat to death in this forum. Although, come to think of it, what topic hasn't.

    In some areas of the country, hho and off road are exactly the same. They come from the same tank at the distributor. In other areas, they are not. The only way to know is to actually call your distributor and ask them.

    By the way, for the first 20 years we lived in our current house, our oil tank sat outside. Some winters we had temps below 0F. We never had the fuel gel and we never dumped in any additives. When the outside tank needed to be replaced, we put it in the basement for aesthetic reasons and because our oil company (1) Recommended it and (2) Did it at no charge.

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