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  1. #1
    Super Star Member Egon's Avatar
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    Default Heating Fuel Oil Tank

    I have taken to adding some conditioner whenever my heating fuel oil tank gets filled.

    Does this do any good?

    Does anyone else do this?
    Egon
    50 years behind the times
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  2. #2
    Platinum Member SeymourBota's Avatar
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    Default Re: Heating Fuel Oil Tank

    If your tank is outside and subjected to below 0 (F), then conditioner or a mix of kerosene will be necessary to stop gelling on the coldest days.

    As far as furnaces go, conditioner won't accomplish much, just make sure the fuel is filtered. Nozzles can clog fast!!

    They do make an additive for use in older tanks which will help break up sludge in the bottom of the tank.
    Peter

  3. #3
    Gold Member
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    Default Re: Heating Fuel Oil Tank

    I've been doing this for several years. Before I started adding conditioner, I had a couple episodes of fuel gelling and wax crystals forming in and clogging the filter. This usually occurred when the temperature remained at about 0 F or below.
    Since I started adding conditioner, no problems. I used to run all over looking for "Heating oil conditioner". Then I just bought diesel anti-gel. When that got hard to find, I just started adding a bottle (3 qt) of Diesel Kleen (white bottle) when my tank is filled. It contains an anti-gel and seems to work just as good.

    My heating oil provider will deliver oil with the treatment included for $.04 per gallon extra, which works out to about $8 per tank. This is about half the cost of the Diesel Kleen, but I prefer to add it myself-that way I KNOW it's in the tank.

    Also, I used to only add the treatment in the coldest part of winter, but it seemed that about once a year the filter element would become clogged (with dirt, not wax), so I started adding the diesel kleen on every fill, and I haven't had that problem since, either.

    The other thing I did was move the filter inside the basement. When we did this we also changed the supply line from the bottom of the tank to exit the top of the tank, suspended about 1 inch from the bottom. The theory is that by suspending the line, any sludge laying in the tank that might clog the line before the fuel gets to the filter will not get picked up. Also, moving the filter inside is supposed to reduce the likelihood of wax crystals forming on the filter element.

    I did all this at about the same time, so I can't say if just adding the conditioner, or just moving the filter inside, would have done the job. I also don't know if we've had winters as cold as the ones when the line clogged. I just know that it's working for me so far.

    Of course, I'm sure it gets a lot colder in Nova Scotia than it does here in central PA, but the anti-gel is supposed to work to something like -30 F, if I recall correctly. The only trick is that you're supposed to add it before the heating oil gets below 32 F, I think. I think that's called the "cloud point". Once the temp of the oil reaches that point, the treatment is not effective.

    I don't what the temp of the oil in the delivery truck is, or how they keep it above 32 F, especially if they load the night before and let the truck sit out all night. That makes me think that maybe all heating oil is "treated" anyway, but it's not something I can control, so I just dump the Diesel Kleen in the tank the morning I'm expecting the delivery.

    Hopefully somebody smarter than me about these things will reply with better information about this subject.
    If ignorance is bliss, then why aren't more people happy?

  4. #4
    Super Star Member
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    Default Re: Heating Fuel Oil Tank

    Quote Originally Posted by Egon
    1*I have taken to adding some conditioner whenever my heating fuel oil tank gets filled.

    Does this do any good?

    Does anyone else do this?
    1*is this to benefit what Tractor or home furnace?
    Is this for winter or summer blend?

    Diesel fuel home heating oil & fuel oil are all the same stuff here so would automatically be treated for winter , therefore no need to treat it again.
    Tractors 2003 Kubota BX1500 / 2004 Kubota Bx23 / 2005 Kubota BX1500.
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  5. #5
    Super Star Member
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    Default Re: Heating Fuel Oil Tank

    Quote Originally Posted by coveredbridge
    1* I used to run all over looking for "Heating oil conditioner".
    Then I just bought diesel anti-gel. .
    2*My heating oil provider will deliver oil with the treatment included for $.04 per gallon extra, which works out to about $8 per tank.
    3*This is about half the cost of the Diesel Kleen, but
    4*I prefer to add it myself-that way I KNOW it's in the tank.


    .
    1*Diesel fuel and Heating oil is the same stuff so no need hunting for "Heating oil conditioner".
    2*Why pay another $.04 a gallon for what's already in winter fuel ?
    3*Great it's only half the rip off as adding it your self !
    4*Wenter blend is already in there.
    Tractors 2003 Kubota BX1500 / 2004 Kubota Bx23 / 2005 Kubota BX1500.
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    South of Canton Ohio L .B

  6. #6
    Super Star Member
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    Default Re: Heating Fuel Oil Tank

    Quote Originally Posted by SeymourBota
    If your tank is outside and subjected to below 0 (F), then conditioner or a mix of kerosene will be necessary to stop gelling on the coldest days.
    Around here fuel oil is winter blended same as diesel fuel is because both are the same thing; therefore adding a conditioner or kerosene should not be necessary.
    Also could there be a danger of increasing the flash point by adding the kerosene resulting in an explosion or flash fire in the homes furnace?
    It's my understanding that diesel fuel additives are designed to be used with vehicle engines not home heating units.
    Tractors 2003 Kubota BX1500 / 2004 Kubota Bx23 / 2005 Kubota BX1500.
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    South of Canton Ohio L .B

  7. #7
    Elite Member DieselPower's Avatar
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    Default Re: Heating Fuel Oil Tank

    Some diesel fuel additives do work very well in furnaces. I started treating mine a couple of years ago and the furnace tech that services it every year said it has the cleanest injector he has ever seen.

    One thing I found is that if you move your filter inside you greatly reduce the chance of your line freezing. I had my outside tank mounted filter freeze up the other year. The old compressed wool type filter. I installed a Detroit Diesel engine fuel filter inside on the side of the furnace. The filter has a water drain in the bottom of it and I drain it regularlly. Probably the best thing I have ever done for my furnace was install a real fuel filter.


  8. #8
    Super Star Member Egon's Avatar
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    Default Re: Heating Fuel Oil Tank

    Thanks for all the replies.

    The fuel oil tank sits in our basement. There is a spin on filter before the furnace. The tank outlet is on the end of the tank, not on the bottom.

    Fuel is delivered by one supplier on an automatic basis based on passed consumption records. I have never hear of any gelling problems in our area.

    There is no intention of using the fuel for anything other than the furnace.

    My use of the conditioner was to limit condensation based water corrosion in the bottom of the tank and also to keep the burner clean.

    Our fuel tank regulation now call for a bottom outlet on any new installations. The insurance companies also require changing out the tanks after so many years.

    Based on the replies I will keep adding conditioner. Thanks
    Egon
    50 years behind the times
    Livin in a
    Worn out skin bag filled with rattlin bones

  9. #9
    Gold Member bialecki's Avatar
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    Default Re: Heating Fuel Oil Tank

    My 1,000 gallon tank (48" diameter) is buried in my side yard and the lines are approximately two feet down as they enter into my cellar, I did at one time purchase some very poor quality heating oil (I had to replace the nozzle every day for two months until I was able to get the level down to dilute it with new oil from a new oil company!) Never-the-less I was able to change a nozzle and adjust the electrodes in my sleep which I did, gets cold at ~3:00 AM when the furnace doesn't kick on! At that time I learned of "Sludge Out" that one can get at Home Depot. Since then, I add 2 quarts per 1,000 gallons and I have yet to have a problem. I am loyal on tuning up the oil fired hot water heater and furnace each October where I replace the nozzles, adjust or replace the electrodes, vacuum the heater box (carefully) clean the flue, replace the sacrificial electrodes in the hot water heater (every two years), and replace the air filters on a regular basis throughout the heating season. With this easy and basic service I minimize any problems.

    By-the-way, I paid an unbelievable $2.47/ gallon of oil this past August. This is the highest I ever paid! How about in your neighborhood what is oil going for?

  10. #10
    Super Star Member Egon's Avatar
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    Default Re: Heating Fuel Oil Tank

    Think its around .70 cents per liter +/- ???

    Haven't had any delivered since last spring so I'm not sure what it is now.
    Egon
    50 years behind the times
    Livin in a
    Worn out skin bag filled with rattlin bones

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