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  1. #11
    Platinum Member
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    kenstrac's Avatar
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    Jan 2009
    Posts
    765
    Location
    So central NH.
    Tractor
    Kioti DK 45

    Default Re: Fuel Mixture for Winter? (#1 and #2 mixture?)

    Quote Originally Posted by LBrown59 View Post
    And you don't have any idea of what's in your tank when you mix it like that.
    You can run #1 who cares how its mixed it still burns. My Kioti manual also says I can use k1 This even started and ran with the thermostart not working.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -im000507-jpg  

  2. #12
    Veteran Member smfcpacfp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    1,305
    Location
    Sands Township, Marquette Co, Michigan
    Tractor
    Kubota B3030HSDC

    Default Re: Fuel Mixture for Winter? (#1 and #2 mixture?)

    I am not sure how cold it gets where NIdaho lives but we have 40+ days on average when the temperature gets below zero. I know how frustrating and time consuming having diesel fuel gel can be.

    My solution is very simple. I use #1 diesel when the temperature could conceivably get below zero. The cloud point (i.e., when a grade of diesel begins to gel) for #1 diesel is -40 F. If you use #1, unless it is colder than -40, you don't have to worry about gelling. You do have to worry about the lack of lubrication in #1 diesel, so you need to add a lubricating additive. I use Opti-Lube XPD. It is a little expensive but is rated as the best.

    Despite what LBrown said it is perfectly acceptable to mix #1 and #2 diesel. #2 diesel has a cloud point of +40. Blending them has a linear effect on the cloud point. Blending 50% #1 and 50% #2 diesel has a cloud point of 0. Putting in the additive will have some effect on the temp at whch gelling occurs. That is what I did with the last batch of fuel I put in my tractor. Even though the average low for my location this time of year is 20, I like to have a huge margin of error.

    Is there any harm in using #1 with adequate lubricant? #1 costs a bit more, it has less energy per gallon than #2, and the additive also adds to the cost. So in the end maybe using appropriately, prepared #1 diesel cost 20% more than #2. The cost and hassle factor of having diesel gel is going to be much higher for me.

    I can't leave this topic without discussing "winter blend". They sell "winter blended" diesel at gas stations around here. If you go into the station and ask the clerk what is the cloud point (or if you don't want to totally baffle them, you might ask them at what temperature will the fuel begin to gel), I will bet 99+% of the time they won't know the answer. We used to have 2 diesel cars. My wife would buy the winter blend. Occasionally we get those -30F to -40F spikes in temperature and her car would start up and go a couple of hundred yards and die. Because she had to get to work before me, she would take my car, telling me what happened, and then I would have to spend half a day getting the car back home using a blow torch to heat up the fuel filter and fuel line while freezing my butt off.

    What was the problem with the "winter blend"? The are blending #1 and #2 to hit the average for your area. When you get a low temperature spike, you are screwed. I do my own blending.
    Last edited by smfcpacfp; 12-23-2009 at 07:24 PM.

  3. #13
    Super Member bp fick's Avatar
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    Aug 2009
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    5,415
    Location
    Beaver Creek, Northern Michigan
    Tractor
    Kubota BX2360

    Default Re: Fuel Mixture for Winter? (#1 and #2 mixture?)

    Likewise in spring, it probably takes until the 4th of July before all the winter mix is completely out my local BP gas station's diesel tanks as they are always just "topping off" with a new delivery from the depot. What the precise blend of "winter" and "summer" is their tanks is likely an ever changing percentage. Ditto for the lag time therefor, in my transport cans and more lag time in my tractor tank. The exact blend is unknown to me. I'd be guessing to speculate.

    Thus, for me, I followed the advice of long timers here at TBN and run the White Bottle year around. That's about all I know to do.

  4. #14
    New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    17
    Location
    McALlister Montana
    Tractor
    Deere 4120

    Default Re: Fuel Mixture for Winter? (#1 and #2 mixture?)

    We have alot of diesels here so getting old diesel is not a problem. I have been told that the winter blend is good to 20 below but i still add PS white to it if its cold below 0. And having to walk when its 20 below sucks so I add straight 1 to the mix if its colder than 10 below seems to work.
    4120, with some implements

  5. #15
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    1,355
    Location
    Up-State New York
    Tractor
    Grand L 3540 HST-3, R4's

    Default Re: Fuel Mixture for Winter? (#1 and #2 mixture?)

    Indaho,
    Bp is right on, use Power Service in the white bottle, it can be purchased in differently sized bottles. Follow mixing instructions on label, I have used this for many years without an issue.My BX23 TBL has never failed to start, and now I'll use the same white bottle on my new B3200 TLB. Living here it upstate N.Y. we do experience cold winters with heavy snow falls, It works for me and it will work for you. BP said it right," that's all I know".
    DevilDog

  6. #16
    Platinum Member
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    kenstrac's Avatar
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    Jan 2009
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    765
    Location
    So central NH.
    Tractor
    Kioti DK 45

    Default Re: Fuel Mixture for Winter? (#1 and #2 mixture?)

    Quote Originally Posted by NIdaho View Post
    Those of you that live where it gets cold (below zero Fahrenheit) -- What do you do for diesel fuel mixtures for your tractors for winter time?

    I had a B7100DT for about 15 years and the guy that I bought it from told me that for winter time use to use a 5 gallon diesel can and fill it from 1/3 to 1/2 full of #1 diesel and then fill it the rest of the way with #2 diesel. I always used a dose of either PowerService (white bottle) or Howes treatement as well. In all the time I had the B7100 I never had a problem with starting in cold weather or the fuel (other than running out of fuel a couple of times).

    Last spring I got a new B3200 and I pushed some snow with it for the first time last Sunday. (Boy the B3200 is nice!) Anyway, I noticed that I am down to about half a tank on the tractor and should think about picking up some diesel for the cold weather. The coldest I have seen it here was in the -30's F (1968) but we have only been in the -10's F the last 10 or so years.

    So what do most of you use?
    Treated (P/S or Howes) #2 Diesel?
    Straight #1 Diesel?
    Mixture of #1 and #2 Diesel?
    Other?
    If this worked well for you before continue doing it.

  7. #17
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    67
    Location
    Sask Canada
    Tractor
    Still Deciding

    Default Re: Fuel Mixture for Winter? (#1 and #2 mixture?)

    I use Texas Refinery DZL-PREP Artic year round here, it comes highly recommended by the farmers who live around us. It is a fuel stabilizer and lubricant as well helps with moisture in the fuel. My 2320 seems to like it very much. We get down to -40 or more here in the winter and I clear snow at -30 some times.
    John

    Deere 2320 with FEL & 53" bucket 62D MMM 647 Tiller Frontier BB2060, SP1060 pulverizer, Pallet forks and middle buster, Land Pride RB1572 rear blade, Allied 50 3pt blower, 62 Gal 3pt PTO sprayer with foam markers, Cosmo 3pt Chipper, KK 5 1/2' double disks

    Gator TH 6x4 Gasser
    JD 216H tiller and mower
    2003 JD LT180 48 Edge deck
    WHite GT 1822 with 42" tiller
    White GT1650 with tiller and deck
    Jacobsen 1450 with deck blower and tiller
    Honda Big Red three wheel
    lots of Stihl stuff

  8. #18
    Super Star Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    16,854
    Location
    First organized permanent settlement in the northwest territory
    Tractor
    2003 Kubota BX1500/2004 Kubota Bx23/2005 Kubota BX1500

    Default Re: Fuel Mixture for Winter? (#1 and #2 mixture?)

    Quote Originally Posted by smfcpacfp View Post
    I am not sure how cold it gets where NIdaho lives but we have 40+ days on average when the temperature gets below zero. I know how frustrating and time consuming having diesel fuel gel can be.

    My solution is very simple. I use #1 diesel when the temperature could conceivably get below zero. The cloud point (i.e., when a grade of diesel begins to gel) for #1 diesel is -40 F. If you use #1, unless it is colder than -40, you don't have to worry about gelling. You do have to worry about the lack of lubrication in #1 diesel, so you need to add a lubricating additive. I use Opti-Lube XPD. It is a little expensive but is rated as the best.

    Despite what LBrown said it is perfectly acceptable to mix #1 and #2 diesel. #2 diesel has a cloud point of +40. Blending them has a linear effect on the cloud point. Blending 50% #1 and 50% #2 diesel has a cloud point of 0. Putting in the additive will have some effect on the cloud point also. That is what I did with the last batch of fuel I put in my tractor. Even though the average low for my location this time of year is 20, I like to have a huge margin of error.

    Is there any harm in using #1 with adequate lubricant? #1 costs a bit more, it has less energy per gallon than #2, and the adative also adds to the cost. So in the end maybe using appropriately, prepared #1 diesel cost 20% more than #2. The cost and hassle factor of having diesel gel is going to be much higher for me.

    I can't leave this topic without discussing "winter blend". They sell "winter blended" diesel at gas stations around here. If you go into the station and ask the clerk what is the cloud point (or if you don't want to totally baffle them, you might ask them at what temperature will the fuel begin to gel), I will bet 99+% of the time they won't know the answer. We used to have 2 diesel cars. My wife would buy the winter blend. Occasionally we get those -30F to -40F spikes in temperature and her car would start up and go a couple of hundred yards and die. Because she had to get to work before me, she would take my car, telling me what happened, and then I would have to spend half a day getting the car back home using a blow torch to heat up the fuel filter and fuel line while freezing my butt off.

    What was the problem with the "winter blend"? The are blending #1 and #2 to hit the average for your area. When you get a low temperature spike, you are screwed. I do my own blending.
    I can't do that here because both are not available here at the same time .
    Tractors 2003 Kubota BX1500 / 2004 Kubota Bx23 / 2005 Kubota BX1500.
    Attachments 60'' Front Blade/48'' Rear Tiller/FEL/Back Hoe /
    60'' MMM/Clamp on Forks/48'' MMM
    South of Canton Ohio L .B

  9. #19
    Silver Member Modn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    130
    Location
    LaFargeville, NY
    Tractor
    Kubota M5140

    Default Re: Fuel Mixture for Winter? (#1 and #2 mixture?)

    I use #2 fuel oil year round and k-1 mixed 50/50 with a shot of white power service in the winter. It hasn't let me down yet. I'm not out in -10° weather plowing either as I have my truck & plow for that. I've run straight k-1 for years on other equipment in winter will no ill effects.
    Kubota M5140, LA1153 loader w/quick attach, R1 tires, 3000# pallet forks, 3point hitch adapter, 60" rotary mower, 1300# 3point ballast block, Uniforest 50E Log Winch

  10. #20
    Elite Member Duffster's Avatar
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    Mar 2009
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    4,372
    Location
    Wisconsin

    Default Re: Fuel Mixture for Winter? (#1 and #2 mixture?)

    We run treated #2 and easily get to 10 below and have never had a problem.
    "If everyone is thinking alike, someone isn't thinking." George Patton

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