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  1. #31
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    2007 Kubota BX24

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    Washing a part with diesel is one thing, I've done that before myself. Filling an engine or other item that has cavities that you may or may not get the diesel out of is a different story.

    Also, I wouldn't buy any fluid that has additives that would bind with water. What you really want is a fluid that does the opposite so that you can actually drain the water out without losing all the fluid.
    Brian

    2008 2500HD CC SB Duramax 6.6L
    2005 Suzuki Eiger
    2009 Rubicon 4-wheeler
    2011 John Deere 2520, FEL, and 62D belly mower, 6 foot box blade, 6 foot rear blade, a set of pallet forks, a 5 foot brush hog.

  2. #32
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
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    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: Milky Oil and Transmission Fluid

    Quote Originally Posted by megaboz View Post
    Washing a part with diesel is one thing, I've done that before myself. Filling an engine or other item that has cavities that you may or may not get the diesel out of is a different story.

    Also, I wouldn't buy any fluid that has additives that would bind with water. What you really want is a fluid that does the opposite so that you can actually drain the water out without losing all the fluid.
    1, I don't make a practice of adding diesel to a crankcase. ( I have done it on non runners for different purposes.. but it came apart during that time too ).

    2, you message is seemingly contradictory.

    you talk about a sump with cavities that will hold fluid.. but then you also don't want the water solvated so it can be flushed.. you want it to set to be drained.

    can't have both!

    if there is a captive area thay will hold diesel puddled and not let it drain.... then it's gonna hold water too!!

    that's why I add atf and 90% rubbing alcohol... disolves the water.. carries it out to be flushed.

    ay water/alcohol mix that remains is much easier to evap or falsh out / off as it is an azeotrope...

  3. #33
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    2007 Kubota BX24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Soundguy

    1, I don't make a practice of adding diesel to a crankcase. ( I have done it on non runners for different purposes.. but it came apart during that time too ).

    2, you message is seemingly contradictory.

    you talk about a sump with cavities that will hold fluid.. but then you also don't want the water solvated so it can be flushed.. you want it to set to be drained.

    can't have both!

    if there is a captive area thay will hold diesel puddled and not let it drain.... then it's gonna hold water too!!

    that's why I add atf and 90% rubbing alcohol... disolves the water.. carries it out to be flushed.

    ay water/alcohol mix that remains is much easier to evap or falsh out / off as it is an azeotrope...
    OK. First off I was trying to be helpful bit obviously it is being blown out of context and we are getting a clear picture. The point was to give the OP some options, not to lose my head.

    And yes I can have it both ways. I don't want my hydraulic fluid to bind with the water. When the tractor sits, the water will settle to the bottom where I can drain most of it out without losing much fluid. Yes all the water may not come out because it could be settling somewhere else in another cavity. Hopefully there isnt too many of those spots. But I can repeat later and hopefully get most of the water out.

    If you are going to flush with anything other than the normal fluid that is used to fill, probably should count on draining the fluid out a couple of times to ensure you get most of it. Diesel loves to eat rubber (and blacktop) that is why I use stuff that is meant to do the job it is intended. In the end, tends to be cheaper.
    Brian

    2008 2500HD CC SB Duramax 6.6L
    2005 Suzuki Eiger
    2009 Rubicon 4-wheeler
    2011 John Deere 2520, FEL, and 62D belly mower, 6 foot box blade, 6 foot rear blade, a set of pallet forks, a 5 foot brush hog.

  4. #34
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Milky Oil and Transmission Fluid

    diesel eats natural rubber... most synthetics doday are fine with it.

    ever notice the oring sin IP's and fuel systems don't disolve?

    same with selas intended to see grease or fuel. the rubber is fine with it.

    if you are talking faucet rubber like on potable water systems.. then yeah.. might have some issues.

    easy fix.. don't use any orings that came from a box that said delta on them..

    if diesel caused serious problems being used as a flush.. then I'd have seen many millions of dollars of destroyed machines by now.

    just hasn't happened..

    again..

    you do what gives you that warm fuzzy feeling.

    i don't want water pooled in my hyds sumps.

    water pooled in the hyd sumps on 55-64 fords is the leading cause or rust holes in internal piping that carries hyds from engine pump, THRU tranny casting, into hyds sump. they are not a simple repair either.

    having a fluid that binds with it for removal, IMHO.. is a much easier choice.

  5. #35
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    Ford 3000 Gas, Case Int. 245 Diesel, Ford NH 555E Backhoe

    Default Re: Milky Oil and Transmission Fluid

    I am refurbing a Ford 3000 gas tractor I bought from my uncle. After starting and running the engine for awhile I noticed milky oil seeping from under the starter where it mounts to the engine block.I removed the starter and noticed the gear on the starter and flywheel were cover with it. I removed the gearshift cover and noticed the same oil. I drained all of it and it filled a 5 gal. bucket. Is it normal for oil to be in the flywheel/started compartment and is common for oil to be like that without it having water in it?

  6. #36
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
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    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: Milky Oil and Transmission Fluid

    milky oil is either water emunsion or air entrainment.

    the latter will settle out..

    sounds like yours got water in it, overfileld the sump.. then you ran it.. it emulsified and mixed.. then leaked out real good from the tranny input shaft seal.. into the 'dry' area of the bellhousing.

    there should have been a cotter-pin drain in the bottom of the dry area to help that oil drain out and not get on the starter.

    in any case. you need to flush the trans sump out and replace oil. check rear sump as well

  7. #37
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    Ford 3000 Gas, Case Int. 245 Diesel, Ford NH 555E Backhoe

    Default Re: Milky Oil and Transmission Fluid

    Thanks Soundguy. I will check it this weekend.

  8. #38
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    Texas
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    John Deere AR, a # of Farmalls, AC WD45, couple of Fords and a Massey Harris

    Default Re: Milky Oil and Transmission Fluid

    condensation I agree and rain water if it has been sitting out. It may not have always been under cover.
    I have a number of IH s all from 30' 40 50 and they all had water in them. that is a very big chunk of iorn. Sitting for years it heats up and cools down with each day. It gets rained on if outside. It is not unusual for water to be in the tranny and possibly engine just from the condensation. they normally hold multiple Gallons of fluid. costs you a few bucks to change it out. Just change it and do check the shifter to see if it has some kind of water deflector to keep rain from running down the stick into the tranny. missing bolts. any place rain water can get in.

    One thing you can do is let it sit for a long time where the water and oil can separate and then crawl under it and crack open the drain plugs to let the water drain. After the water quits and solid oil starts coming out close it up and top it off with new oil.

    The best thing to do is change the oil with new. Drain the oil get some diesel and pour throught it to flush it out and then put the correct oil back in it.

    Water in Oil of those old timers should be expected if they have been sitting for years.

  9. #39
    Silver Member Frankdozer's Avatar
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    Bridgton, Maine
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    1984 John Deere 455D

    Default Re: Milky Oil and Transmission Fluid

    Again..............................It's condensation................Same thing happened to my John Deere 455D track Loader. It sat for a few years and I started it to use, I drove it to the front yard and the trany and final drives were really milky. I started to panic thinking I had a serious water leak. I changed all the fluids and voila everything is roses again. You need to use the machine more often.
    1984 John Deere 455D Loader with a 4 in 1 bucket

  10. #40
    Silver Member Frankdozer's Avatar
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    1984 John Deere 455D

    Default Re: Milky Oil and Transmission Fluid

    And I didn't use any cleaning fluids of any sort. I just drained all the old fluids and filters and replaced all the fluids and filters with John Deere products. John Deere products are what is recommended and in the long run the added cost is negligible. No worrying if the comparable product meets John Deere specs. Frank
    1984 John Deere 455D Loader with a 4 in 1 bucket

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