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  1. #11
    Veteran Member xring100's Avatar
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    The auto parts stores like napa should have fittings. I dont remember where mine came from

    Dave

  2. #12
    Veteran Member xring100's Avatar
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    Actually i put a Parker quick connect on both my fuel pressure gauge , the fitting to the fuel rail , and another on on some rubber fuel line.

    Dave

  3. #13
    Super Star Member
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    Northern Fingerlakes region of NY, USA
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    Kubota L3830GST, B7500HST, BX2660

    Default Re: Getting gas out of car.

    Most fuel rails have a Schrader valve to test pressure. Get a Schrader to NPT adapter (such as Caspers 107133 Schrader Valve Fuel Press Gauge Fitting : Amazon.com : Automotive ) and hook a hose to that.

    Aaron Z
    A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
    Robert Heinlein, Time Enough for Love

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Getting gas out of car.

    Those two guys in the YouTube video aren't real bright. In addition to using a drill to power their drill pump, (chance of the fuel vapors igniting in the presence of the drill motor's sparks), that pump isn't suitable for pumping fuel anyway. Those pumps have rubber impellars that won't tolerate contact with fuel. There's a comment from someone that followed their "advice" saying that such a pump will work.....once. Then it's junk.

    I've used my fuel pressure tester several times on jobsites to borrow fuel from one machine for another. The pushbutton pressure bleed-off built right into the gauge works fine as a valve to control fuel flow out the clear bleed-off hose attached to the gauge. Not advising anyone to do this, but I do it myself: Leave the "donor" engine running, then there's no need to pull a relay to jumper it out, or to toggle the key off/on and pump fuel for a few seconds at a time. With the donor engine running, I just push the pressure relief button and pump fuel into a container. Pushing the button and holding it "wide open" will cause the pressure to the fuel rail to drop off enough to stall the engine. This certainly isn't the fastest way to transfer fuel, but it works.

    These Equus gauges cost about $30-35 at parts stores and usually come with GM, Ford, and Chrysler rail adapters. (They also come with a cheesy plastic adapter tee with hoses and clamps for use on imports, but I've never used that setup.):

    Equus 3640 Professional Fuel Injection Pressure Tester : Amazon.com : Automotive

    The adapter fittings that have been linked to already in this thread will work as well to thread onto a fuel rail, but many of them don't have the pin in the center to depress the mating pin in the fuel rail fitting itself. You'll have to remove the Schrader valve core from the rail to get any fuel through the adapter fitting if it's just a straight-through fitting. If you're going to remove the Schrader valve core from the fuel rail anyway, then it's really not necessary to get the adapter fitting in the first place. Remove the Schrader valve core and slide a section of hose that fits snugly over the fuel rail fitting right on. On the Ford industrial EFI stuff I deal with, the rail's Schrader core comes out with a standard tire valve stem core removal tool.

    As always, be careful and have a working fire extinguisher handy when doing anything like this.

  5. #15
    Super Star Member
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    Default Re: Getting gas out of car.

    Quote Originally Posted by brokenot View Post
    The adapter fittings that have been linked to already in this thread will work as well to thread onto a fuel rail, but many of them don't have the pin in the center to depress the mating pin in the fuel rail fitting itself. You'll have to remove the Schrader valve core from the rail to get any fuel through the adapter fitting if it's just a straight-through fitting. If you're going to remove the Schrader valve core from the fuel rail anyway, then it's really not necessary to get the adapter fitting in the first place. Remove the Schrader valve core and slide a section of hose that fits snugly over the fuel rail fitting right on. On the Ford industrial EFI stuff I deal with, the rail's Schrader core comes out with a standard tire valve stem core removal tool.
    Good to know.

    Quote Originally Posted by brokenot View Post
    As always, be careful and have a working fire extinguisher handy when doing anything like this.
    Very important, I almost burned a car up once because I didn't have a fire extinguisher handy when checking injectors.

    Aaron Z
    A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
    Robert Heinlein, Time Enough for Love

  6. #16
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    Ontario
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    CT235

    Default Re: Getting gas out of car.

    If you've ever seen the fog of atomized fuel that comes out of an open fuel line in a modern car, you will get a cold chill even thinking about the fuel rail trick. Had it happen in an older RX7, where two of us were leaning over the fenders as the air was filled around us with fuel in an instant, and then the engine caught... I thought we were dead meat.
    Tim.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by tcartwri
    If you've ever seen the fog of atomized fuel that comes out of an open fuel line in a modern car, you will get a cold chill even thinking about the fuel rail trick. Had it happen in an older RX7.....
    I had two of those cars, both carbs, so I never had to deal with the leaky injectors and flooding problems.
    Dan H.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by brokenot
    Those two guys in the YouTube video aren't real bright. In addition to using a drill to power their drill pump, (chance of the fuel vapors igniting in the presence of the drill motor's sparks), that pump isn't suitable for pumping fuel anyway. Those pumps have rubber impellars that won't tolerate contact with fuel. There's a comment from someone that followed their "advice" saying that such a pump will work.....once. Then it's junk.
    Yah, no shortage of idiots on youtube.
    I've used my fuel pressure tester several times on jobsites to borrow fuel from one machine for another. The pushbutton pressure bleed-off built right into the gauge works fine as a valve to control fuel flow out the clear bleed-off hose attached to the gauge.
    I didn't know the gauge kits had a bleed off valve. That's just what I'm looking for.


    Not advising anyone to do this, but I do it myself: Leave the "donor" engine running, then there's no need to pull a relay to jumper it out, or to toggle the key off/on and pump fuel for a few seconds at a time. With the donor engine running, I just push the pressure relief button and pump fuel into a container. Pushing the button and holding it "wide open" will cause the pressure to the fuel rail to drop off enough to stall the engine. This certainly isn't the fastest way to transfer fuel, but it works.
    That should be fine. The jeep drinks a lot of gas, so the pump should have plenty of extra flow at idle.


    These Equus gauges cost about $30-35 at parts stores and usually come with GM, Ford, and Chrysler rail adapters. (They also come with a cheesy plastic adapter tee with hoses and clamps for use on imports, but I've never used that setup.):

    Equus 3640 Professional Fuel Injection Pressure Tester : Amazon.com : Automotive

    The adapter fittings that have been linked to already in this thread will work as well to thread onto a fuel rail, but many of them don't have the pin in the center to depress the mating pin in the fuel rail fitting itself. You'll have to remove the Schrader valve core from the rail to get any fuel through the adapter fitting if it's just a straight-through fitting. If you're going to remove the Schrader valve core from the fuel rail anyway, then it's really not necessary to get the adapter fitting in the first place. Remove the Schrader valve core and slide a section of hose that fits snugly over the fuel rail fitting right on. On the Ford industrial EFI stuff I deal with, the rail's Schrader core comes out with a standard tire valve stem core removal tool.
    I thought of pulling the valve core, but I would be afraid of dropping it.


    As always, be careful and have a working fire extinguisher handy when doing anything like this.
    That's good advice. Quick response in case of fire is important.
    And with a real fire extinguisher, not one of those plastic 'toys' from kiddie.
    Dan H.

  9. #19
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    Thanks for all the help everyone!
    I'm going to the auto parts store to see what they have.
    Nuts.... I just realized I left my car outside and we got 6 in. of snow overnight. And I left my snow brush in the car. Oh well, won't kill me.
    Dan H.

  10. #20
    Super Member Gary Fowler's Avatar
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    Bismarck Arkansas
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    2009 Kubota RTV 900, 2009 Kubota B26 TLB & 2010 model LS P7010

    Default Re: Getting gas out of car.

    Quote Originally Posted by CNC Dan View Post
    Yah, no shortage of idiots on youtube.

    I didn't know the gauge kits had a bleed off valve. That's just what I'm looking for.


    That should be fine. The jeep drinks a lot of gas, so the pump should have plenty of extra flow at idle.



    I thought of pulling the valve core, but I would be afraid of dropping it.



    That's good advice. Quick response in case of fire is important.
    And with a real fire extinguisher, not one of those plastic 'toys' from kiddie.
    You guys kill me with your safety police, you blast the "idiot" with the electric drill that is in open air running an electric drill that produces sparks, but have no qualms about opening a vent in a running gasoline car engine to spray or potentially spray high pressure gas into the air. (it happened to one poster per his comment) At least with their system, if a fire did start, if could be contained outside the engine compartment of the car. I am not condoning the YouTube video but I think it is far safer than opening a fuel line off the injector rail of a running engine. Even if you have proper fitting on steel lines to do it. If you wanted to get fuel out from the fuel rail, why not just turn the key to on, the fuel pump will start to run at that time, no need to set up a potential spark producer.
    By the way, they do make hand crank pumps for fuel distillates that will do the same thing as the drill run pump. I think you would be OK using that type of set up especially since you may not have electrical power.
    2010 LS P-7010C 20F/20R gear tractor & FEL, 2009 Kubota B 26 TLB, RTV 900 Kubota,17 foot Lund boat with 70HP motor, 2012-20 ft 12k GVW trailer, 2011- 52" Craftsman ZTR mower, 2013 Ferris Zero Turn, 3 weed whackers, pressure washer, leaf blowers, 7 foot bush hog, 8 foot landscape rake , 8 foot 3 PH disc, 2 row cultivator, 350 amp Miller AC/DC welding machine and all the tools needed to keep them all repaired and running.

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