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  1. #21
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    417
    Tractor
    08 Cub Ex3200

    Default Re: Getting gas out of car.

    Sounds like a lot of work especially when you knew the storm was on its way for at the very least a few days. If it was a survival thing I could see, but just to get fuel? Buy a few gas cans and be more prepared.

  2. #22
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    837
    Location
    sioux city, ia
    Tractor
    Oliver 1855, Case 1840, Cub 1550

    Default Re: Getting gas out of car.

    I use a fuel pressure test kit to drain fuel tanks, most have a pressure release valve and hose. Install a jumper wire in place of fuel pump relay. Do this outside or in a well vented area. It takes about 10 min to fill a 5 gal fuel jug.

    Dave

  3. #23
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,289
    Location
    Up State S.C.
    Tractor
    AC WD 34 hp/3500 lbs MF 261 60 hp/5380 lbs

    Default Re: Getting gas out of car.

    Now I know why I haven't been able to syphon gas from a car in a long, long time. There's probably a whole generation of adults by now who don't even know what gasoline tastes like.

  4. #24
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    657
    Location
    north shore MA.

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by puckgrinder85
    Sounds like a lot of work especially when you knew the storm was on its way for at the very least a few days. If it was a survival thing I could see, but just to get fuel? Buy a few gas cans and be more prepared.
    You're right, should have had more gas. But mom doesn't like having gas in the house. They have no land, outside what the house sits on. And no garage. I won't let them keep it in the furnace room, and she doesn't like it in the loggia. Not to mention that we haven't lost power for more than an hour since they got the generator about 10 years ago. And now they have a new rule at the gas station: Can't put gas cans in the car, unless you have a trunk, or pickup bed.
    Dan H.

  5. #25
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    657
    Location
    north shore MA.

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Fowler
    You guys kill me with your safety police, you blast the "idiot" with the electric drill that is in open air running an electric drill that produces sparks, but have no qualms about opening a vent in a running gasoline car engine to spray or potentially spray high pressure gas into the air. (it happened to one poster per his comment) At least with their system, if a fire did start, if could be contained outside the engine compartment of the car. I am not condoning the YouTube video but I think it is far safer than opening a fuel line off the injector rail of a running engine. Even if you have proper fitting on steel lines to do it. If you wanted to get fuel out from the fuel rail, why not just turn the key to on, the fuel pump will start to run at that time, no need to set up a potential spark producer.
    By the way, they do make hand crank pumps for fuel distillates that will do the same thing as the drill run pump. I think you would be OK using that type of set up especially since you may not have electrical power.
    But one of the problems I was having is not being able to get a tube onto the gas tank due to the roll over valve. If i could, I wouldn't need any pump at all. If I ever have the tank dropped for some reason, I might just get rid of the roll over valve.
    Dan H.

  6. #26
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    336

    Default Re: Getting gas out of car.

    You guys kill me with your safety police, you blast the "idiot" with the electric drill that is in open air running an electric drill that produces sparks, but have no qualms about opening a vent in a running gasoline car engine to spray or potentially spray high pressure gas into the air.
    I "blasted" them for a couple of reasons. First of all, drill motors with brushes DO produce sparks...unless you're talking about a fancy tool specifically designed for use in an explosive atmosphere. Secondly, the *star* in the video clip totally blew off the message on the pump he recommended using. I doubt if he even has enough smarts to know why the message was there. Was it entirely to point out that pumping fuel with such a pump was dangerous? No....it's also because the pump isn't suited for the job. What it's made of virtually guarantees it's going to fail. Fail might just mean it stops pumping. It could also mean it could stop pumping and leak all over the place while the operator is attempting to use it. I suppose I could have also "blasted" him for his attitude, because he was obviously trying to portray himself as some sort of bad@ss with his dropping of the f-bomb about the pump warning, but I thought that that was obvious.

    FWIW, the pressure gauge I use is made to be used with fuel. It's designed to stand up to the fluid it's testing and the pressure it has to deal with. They are designed to be operated with the engine either on or off....depending on what the diagnosis process requires. When I use mine to borrow fuel from one piece of equipment to put into another, the only thing I'm doing that's "outside the box" as far as the gauge manufacturer is concerned, is that I'm directing the fuel from the clear bleed-off hose into a container to use in something else....rather than just bleeding off the pressure to prevent spills when disconnecting the fitting.

    Here's a link to the instruction manual for the gauge I use. On page 10, it describes a typical pressure testing scenario in which the pressure is checked with the key on and engine off....as well as with the engine idling. The bleed-off hose on my gauge is about 3 feet long, which is plenty to reach outside of the engine compartment and direct the fuel and into a suitable container.

    http://www.equus.com/Content/Support..._20JUN2002.pdf

    I posted it what I've done, but also mentioned that I don't "advise it". I also mentioned to be careful and to have a working fire extinguisher handy...just in case.

    Did I spike my hair, put on some cool shades, and offer up some expletives while telling others to ignore warnings manufacturers put on an item I'm showing people how to use? Nope. I'll leave that to the YouTube instructors.


  7. #27
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    141
    Location
    N. IL
    Tractor
    Kioti CK 27 shuttle

    Default Re: Getting gas out of car.

    Quote Originally Posted by stuckmotor View Post
    Now I know why I haven't been able to syphon gas from a car in a long, long time. There's probably a whole generation of adults by now who don't even know what gasoline tastes like.
    It is funny just how true this is. I know for one I don't enjoy it but when you need some fuel and its sitting in another tractor or truck in your barn or around the yard. You do what you got to do. I've had it before when I couldn't get out but I had to get fuel. All you really need is a tube small enough to get into the neck of the tank. In the case of a rollover or other siphoning protection your somewhat out of luck for the low tech fix.

  8. #28
    Super Star Member Diamondpilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    13,837
    Location
    Daleville, IN
    Tractor
    Jinma 254/284 Ford 861 Powermaster at work

    Default

    I have pumped out tanks on fuel injected engines by making up a fitting for the fuel pressure check port on the fuel rail. Looks like a air valve on a tire.

    Chris

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