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  1. #1
    Veteran Member
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    South East Michigan
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    New Holland TC30 Hydro 4x4, Gravely Zero Turn Mower

    Default Storing fuel advice, comments requested

    I've been storing my gas, diesel, and kerosene in my barn. The barn is 24x40 and the gas is kept on a 4ft high shelf in the back-right corner. I also have multiple gas powered equipment in various places throughout the barn.
    I do a far amount of welding and grinding in the front-left corner of the barn. I've never had any problem with this arrangement, but I guess, when it comes to gas, you generally only get one accident per lifetime. So, I've been thinking about getting a plastic storage locker and putting it outside. I would then store my seven fuel containers in this locker.
    What I am wondering about is condensation. I never get any condensation in the barn, but I'm sure that will not be the case in the plastice locker. I'm concerned about water contaminating all my fuel.
    Any thoughts ?
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  2. #2
    Veteran Member
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    Sep 2001
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    Kansas
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    Kubota L3000DT

    Default Re: Storing fuel advice, comments requested

    Yeah. I think you've got a good idea. Condensation (if it even happens) is a lot easier to deal with than third-degree burns.

  3. #3
    Bronze Member
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    Maryland

    Default Re: Storing fuel advice, comments requested

    I wouldn't worry about condensation in the fuels since I assume the containers have closed tops. However, you also don't want fuel vapor accumulating from spills, leak and residue on containers. Add some vents to the locker, and since fuel vapors are heavier than air, be sure to have vents top and bottom. That will also help keep mold from formng.

  4. #4
    Veteran Member NY_Yankees_Fan's Avatar
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    Mar 2002
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    2,027
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    Warren County, NJ (60 miles from NYC)
    Tractor
    Kubota BX 2200

    Default Re: Storing fuel advice, comments requested

    Jerry,

    Another option is to store the combustible and flammable liquids inside of a flammable liquids cabinet inside of the barn, far away from welding, at least 30 feet by code.

    The following is from NFPA 30, 2003 Flammable & Combustible Liquids Code. As far as venting the cabinet is concerned see section 6.3.4 below, regardless of what you do. If you go with a plastic cabinet I would not put it next to the barn, but at least 10 feet away.

    Section 6.3.3

    Wooden cabinets constructed in the following manner shall be acceptable:
    (a) The bottom, sides, and top shall be constructed of exterior grade plywood that is at least 25 mm (1 in.) thick and of a type that will not break down or delaminate under fire conditions.
    (b) All joints shall be rabbetted and shall be fastened in two directions with wood screws. Where more than one door is used, there shall be a rabbetted overlap of not less than 25 mm (1 in.).
    (c) Doors shall be equipped with a means of latching and hinges shall be constructed and mounted in such a manner as to not lose their holding capacity when subjected to fire exposure.
    (d) A raised sill or pan capable of containing a 50 mm (2 in.) depth of liquid shall be provided at the bottom of the cabinet to retain spilled liquid within the cabinet.
    (4) Listed storage cabinets that have been constructed and tested in accordance with 6.3.3(1) shall be acceptable.
    6.3.4* The storage cabinet shall not be required by this code to be vented for fire protection purposes, and vent openings shall be sealed with the bungs supplied with the cabinet or with bungs specified by the cabinet manufacturer. However, if the storage cabinet is vented for any reason, the cabinet shall be vented directly to outdoors in such a manner that will not compromise the specified performance of the cabinet and in a manner that is acceptable to the authority having jurisdiction.

    A.6.3.4 Venting of storage cabinets has not been demonstrated to be necessary for fire protection purposes. Additionally, venting a cabinet could compromise the ability of the cabinet to adequately protect its contents from involvement in a fire because cabinets are not generally tested with any venting. Therefore, venting of storage cabinets is not recommended.

    However, it is recognized that some jurisdictions can require storage cabinets to be vented and that venting can also be desirable for other reasons, such as health and safety. In such cases, the venting system should be installed so as to not affect substantially the desired performance of the cabinet during a fire. Means of accomplishing this can include thermally actuated dampers on the vent openings or sufficiently insulating the vent piping system to prevent the internal temperature of the cabinet from rising above that specified. Any make-up air to the cabinet should also be arranged in a similar manner.

    If vented, the cabinet should be vented from the bottom with make-up air supplied to the top. Also, mechanical exhaust ventilation is preferred and should comply with NFPA 91, Standard for Exhaust Systems for Air Conveying of Vapors, Gases, Mists, and Noncombustible Particulate Solids. Manifolding the vents of multiple storage cabinets should be avoided.

    6.3.5 Storage cabinets shall be marked in conspicuous lettering:
    FLAMMABLE KEEP FIRE AWAY.

  5. #5
    Super Star Member
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    Oct 2004
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    16,854
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    First organized permanent settlement in the northwest territory
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    2003 Kubota BX1500/2004 Kubota Bx23/2005 Kubota BX1500

    Default Re: Storing fuel advice, comments requested

    I never store gas or diesel inside a basement garage or pole building.
    I keep it <font color="red"> out side </font> in an old freezer which didn't cost me a cent .

  6. #6
    Super Star Member
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    2003 Kubota BX1500/2004 Kubota Bx23/2005 Kubota BX1500

    Default Re: Storing fuel advice, comments requested

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( I've been storing my gas, diesel, and kerosene in my barn. The barn is 24x40 and the gas is kept on a 4ft high shelf in the back-right corner. I also have multiple gas powered equipment in various places throughout the barn.
    I do a far amount of welding and grinding in the front-left corner of the barn. I've never had any problem with this arrangement, but I guess, when it comes to gas, you generally only get one accident per lifetime. So, I've been thinking about getting a plastic storage locker and putting it outside. I would then store my seven fuel containers in this locker.
    What I am wondering about is condensation. I never get any condensation in the barn, but I'm sure that will not be the case in the plastice locker. I'm concerned about water contaminating all my fuel.
    Any thoughts ? )</font>
    Rather than one of these I'm thinking of going with a small cheap metal shed storage building say around 8 x 10 or maybe a 10 x 12 and putting my fuels push mower weed eater chain saw etc in it.

  7. #7
    Super Member
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    Sep 2000
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    9,947
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    Triangle Of North Carolina
    Tractor
    JD 4700

    Default Re: Storing fuel advice, comments requested

    I don't keep much gas hanging around. Usually just a gallon with oil to run the Stihls. Now that I have the DR Mower, I might buy four gallons of gas that I put in two containers. The mower burns a gallon an hour and I can only handle about two hours at a time on the beast. So I the most I have on hand in the containers is 2-3 gallons.

    I store the gas in lockable truck boxes I keep on the north side of the barn. They boxes never get hit with direct sun. I had the boxes and don't want them in the truck any more and they are real handy for holding the gas, paints, oils, and other nasty stuff. And they are water tight.

    Later,
    Dan

  8. #8
    Elite Member
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    Mar 2006
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    Wisconsin
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    2003 NH TN70A

    Default Re: Storing fuel advice, comments requested

    I have a small shed, keep all my oil, gas, etc in that shed. I don't use the shed for anything but storing new oil, used oil and fuel. Just seems easier that way.
    Bob

  9. #9
    Super Star Member
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    Default Re: Storing fuel advice, comments requested

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( I have a small shed, keep all my oil, gas, etc in that shed. I don't use the shed for anything but storing new oil, used oil and fuel. <font color="red"> Just seems easier that way.
    </font> Just seems easier that way.
    Bob )</font>
    <font color="red">It's also a lot smarter than keeping it in the house or garage or in work shops and barns </font>

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    522
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Tractor
    Kubota B7800

    Default Re: Storing fuel advice, comments requested

    I keep gas and oil in a separate shed about 50' away from the barn where my tractor, implements and diesel fuel are stored. I do store diesel fuel and kerosene at the rear of the barn, about 30' away from the front where I do some welding. When I am welding, I rig fire resistant curtains between the welding and diesel storage areas.

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