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  1. #1
    Silver Member yekrut's Avatar
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    May 2007
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    158
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    Paris, Ohio
    Tractor
    Bolens (Iseki Deisel) G214

    Default How are tires filled?

    I've read quite a few threads related to filling tires for ballast but don't recall the process being mentioned. I think it is probably something I need to do but have a few concerns related to it and wondered how difficult it would be to do it later? Can you do it you self? I'm finalizing a kubota L39 purchase and would like to know if this absolutelyshould be done at the dealer before it's delivered or can I wait and see if I need it and do it later?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Super Star Member RoyJackson's Avatar
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    Nov 2001
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    19,047
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    Bethel, Vermont
    Tractor
    John Deere 4520 MFWD, Deere 855D UTV, Z920A Zero Turn Mower and assorted implements

    Default Re: How are tires filled?

    There are a lot of posts describing how to do this and the tools required. Just do a search and spend a few hours learning more about filling tractor tires then you'll ever want to know.
    The attached picture is one of the tools you'll need.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Roy Jackson

    "Any government that does not trust its citizens with firearms is either a tyranny, or planning to become one."
    -Joseph P. Martino

  3. #3
    Silver Member yekrut's Avatar
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    May 2007
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    Paris, Ohio
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    Bolens (Iseki Deisel) G214

    Default Re: How are tires filled?

    Thanks Roy. Will do.

  4. #4
    Elite Member
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    MtnViewRanch's Avatar
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    Mar 2005
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    7,768
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    4000\' mountains of Southern California
    Tractor
    Mahindra 7520, Mahindra 3215HST, Case 580 extendahoe, Case 310 dozer, Parsons trencher, Cat D6,

    Default Re: How are tires filled?

    It took me 2 hours to fill my 4 tires using the tool that Roy posted, a hose and a funnel.


    Easy and cheap, good luck.
    Brian
    Top and Tilt Kits by Fit Rite Hydraulics

  5. #5
    Silver Member yekrut's Avatar
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    May 2007
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    158
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    Paris, Ohio
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    Bolens (Iseki Deisel) G214

    Default Re: How are tires filled?

    Thanks

  6. #6
    New Member shop_rat45's Avatar
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    Jun 2007
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    14
    Location
    Columbiaville, MI
    Tractor
    New Holland TC30

    Default Re: How are tires filled?

    What is the best thing to fill them with? I've heard of using salt, but that seems like bad juju for the wheels. Sorry about the noob questions, but my first tractor won't be here until Friday.
    Does anyone know where I left the keys to my tractor??

  7. #7
    Veteran Member
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    Jun 2004
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    1,368
    Location
    N.E. KY
    Tractor
    Century 3035

    Default Re: How are tires filled?

    You want to fill the tires with something that won't freeze if you live in an area that this can happen in. They use typically use calcium chloride. Not only does this prevent freezing it adds weight.

    On my tractors tires it took about 40 lbs of CaCl per 50 gallons of water. That's an extra 40 lbs. of weight over just water per tire. This added an additional 457 lbs of ballast per tire.

    There are other substances that can be used, some specifically marketed for this purpose, and others that aren't (windshield washer fluid). The drawback to CaCl is that it can be EXTREMELY corrosive to exposed steel. The advantage is it is generally less expnsive than other substances, and widely available.

    As far as waiting too get it done, this wouldn't be a problem. In my area there are at least 3 companies that will come to my farm and perform tire maintenance. I would guesstimate the cost somewhere around $75 per tire.
    Last edited by MicroPilot; 06-12-2007 at 03:09 AM.
    Century 3035, FEL, RC, RFM, Box Blade, Pond Scoop, Boom Pole, Hay Spear

  8. #8

    Default Re: How are tires filled?

    My dealer says they fill with beet juice.

  9. #9
    Gold Member Slacker's Avatar
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    Jun 2005
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    491
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Tractor
    Farmtrac 360 TLB

    Default Re: How are tires filled?

    Petsafe antifreeze, windshield washer fluid, plain water all work well. Keep in mind the freezing potential if your in a cold area.

  10. #10
    Super Member Farmwithjunk's Avatar
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    Mt Washington, Kentucky
    Tractor
    Where do I begin.....

    Default Re: How are tires filled?

    Quote Originally Posted by deanhedges
    My dealer says they fill with beet juice.
    Would that same dealer coincidentally SELL beet juice? (Rim Guard)
    It ain't cheap. It IS a good alternative, as it doesn't promote rusty rims or create a hazmat situation with a simple tire puncture.

    I log a LOT of hours in a typical "tractor year". With those hours comes more likelyhood of flats. With the cost of a tire repair service, it becomes cheaper in the long run to get your own equipment to handle the job. It isn't brain surgery. I've done dozens of my own tires. (3 last week alone....) Total cost involved in getting set up to do them (with long lasting equipment) is typically around $100 to $150, pump, hoses, bleeder valve, and a barrel. Fluid can even be gravity fed. (pump is MUCH faster) Same equipment can be used to remove fluid in the event of a flat. In that situation, you want the speed of a pump. (to save as much fluid as possible/prevent as much of the "spill" as possible)

    Any of the multiple choices of "fill" has it's advantages and disadvantages.

    Ca/cl is corrosive and will kill grass if spilled. You can get more pounds per gallon with CA/CL than any other option.

    Windshield washer fluid is a tad more expensive and not completely without environmental risk.

    Beet juice can be EXPENSIVE.

    Pure water is risky at best regarding freezing.

    I'd highly recommend using tubes. Tubeless tires can be filled, and with precautions, isn't a death knell to your rims (corrosion) but tubes offer more protection.

    My personal choice? I use ca/cl. I've seen my share of rotted out rims, but with my own tractors, I've made certain the rims are maintained and protected as much as humanly possible. I've got one tractor that's been with me since 1971, calcium chloride in the rear tires every since, and rims that look ALMOST new. The trick is to clean them up REAL good when you do get a puncture.

    Final alternative? Cast iron weights. They're non-corrosive for sure, but not nearly as cheap. Fluid is carried lower, having less of a negative effect on center of gravity of the tractor. (fluid may even provides MORE stability)
    There are three kinds of men;
    1.) The ones that learn by reading
    2.) The few who learn by observation
    3.) The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.

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