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  1. #1
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    50
    Location
    CT/NY

    Default New Guy, First Tractor

    Hello all, i picked up a "59" ford 801 for the main reason to use a brush hog and do some tilling. I have no experience running a tractor so there might be a few more questions later on. The fellow that sold it to me showed me the basic operations to use the pto and 3 point set up. I was looking it over and saw a small lever located just in front of the pto control shaft, looked it up in the manual that he gave me, and its for draft control. Can someone please explain what this is? I tryed doing a search but am not very familiar with this site yet, but i have heard of "draft control" here somewhere (wish i saved it)
    This is a great site with lots of info i have already stumbled upon, so please forgive me if my question/s are "silly".

  2. #2
    Veteran Member kevinj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    1,322
    Location
    West MI
    Tractor
    BX-1860, L3940HSTC, B7500, Farmall M, Farmall 560D

    Default Re: New Guy, First Tractor

    Quote Originally Posted by R-G
    Hello all, i picked up a "59" ford 801 for the main reason to use a brush hog and do some tilling. I have no experience running a tractor so there might be a few more questions later on. The fellow that sold it to me showed me the basic operations to use the pto and 3 point set up. I was looking it over and saw a small lever located just in front of the pto control shaft, looked it up in the manual that he gave me, and its for draft control. Can someone please explain what this is? I tryed doing a search but am not very familiar with this site yet, but i have heard of "draft control" here somewhere (wish i saved it)
    This is a great site with lots of info i have already stumbled upon, so please forgive me if my question/s are "silly".
    This was a search for "draft control"

    http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/s...earchid=674632
    Kevin

    BX1860, mower, snowblower - B7500HST, FEL, Bush Hog - Grand L3940 HSTC, FEL, snowblower, 6' Landpride brush hog, 6' King Kutter tiller, Corn Pro 18+5 Fifth Wheel, 1950 Farmall M, Farmall 560D

  3. #3
    Gold Member mboulais's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    448
    Location
    Palermo, NY
    Tractor
    Mahindra 4110

    Default Re: New Guy, First Tractor

    Draft control is used to maintain working depth on ground engaging equipment. ie.. 1 or 2 bottom plows, cultivators, subsoilers.

    It works by pulling up on the 3pt when drag increases (caused by soil pulling implement deeper). When drag is reduced (tractor going over small rise), it allows implement to drop some more. You will want it off for bush hoggin' and I think for tilling too.

    Good luck, and keep asking questions.
    Last edited by mboulais; 06-19-2007 at 09:24 PM.

  4. #4
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    1,128

    Default Re: New Guy, First Tractor

    When that lever is up, the tractors hydraulics are in "position" control, which is where they should be for most tasks, especially mowing. The lower link arms are kept in constant position relative to the tractor. Move that lever down and the hydraulics will be in "draft" control. This setting is reserved mainly for a plow and helps achieve constant depth plowing as the tractor moves over uneven terrain. In draft control the lower link arms are moved up or down automatically as the load on the upper link increases or decreases. To remember which position is which, just remember: Draft - D - Down. Until you hook that tractor to a plow, keep the lever up in position control at all times. Certain tractors, like old Fergusons, had only draft control, and when used for mowing, required chaining the lower links up to keep the mower from crashing into the ground whenever the load on the upper link got low. Many newer tractors, including most CUT's, have only position control, and when used on a plow, require frequent manual adjustment to maintain even depth as the tractor crosses uneven terrain. Fords were the first tractors to offer both draft and position control around 60 years ago, and to this day, that system has not been improved significantly.

  5. #5
    Veteran Member jbrumberg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    2,073
    Location
    Western MA
    Tractor
    New Holland TC29DA, John Deere 455D

    Default Re: New Guy, First Tractor

    R-G:

    Welcome to TBN ! There no silly questions. We all have had our own "learning curves" and some of our "curves" have been steeper than others . I have seen some really stupid answers to some honest questions on occassion. Keep the posts coming . Jay
    NH TC29DA with 14LA and HD QA 60" bucket, weighted R-1's, FOPS, CCM M-160 (58") Tiller, Tebben MD 60" Rotary Cutter, Woods LR 108 (96") Landscape Rake, FEL cutting edge and tooth bar, Woods GB60 (60") Box Blade, Wallenstein BXM32

    1995 John Deere 455 Diesel with 48" mower, MC 519 Cart with PowerVac

  6. #6
    Super Star Member RoyJackson's Avatar
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    Nov 2001
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    18,635
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    Bethel, Vermont
    Tractor
    John Deere 4400 MFWD, Deere 855D UTV, Z920A Zero Turn Mower and assorted implements

    Default Re: New Guy, First Tractor

    Biggest thing for a new operator is learning safety.
    Tractors can roll fairly easily under the right conditions. You old Ford doesn't have many of the safety additions the newer machines do, such as a ROPS (Roll Over Protective Structure).

    Never...repeat, never tow anything rigged to any part of the tractor except the draw bar. Rigging anywhere else is a receipe for a deady accident.
    Maintain a distance from you PTO when in operation. I strongly suggest you have your tractor key in your pocket (meaning engine off) when working around or rigging an implement to the PTO. If your Cutter or tractor does not have an over-running clutch, get one (cutters can push the tractor even if the clutch is disengaged).


    TBN has a good Safety Forum. You'll learn a lot if you read it.
    Roy Jackson

    "Any government that does not trust its citizens with firearms is either a tyranny, or planning to become one."
    -Joseph P. Martino

  7. #7
    Gold Member dtd24's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    406
    Location
    Schenectady, NY
    Tractor
    98 JD 1070

    Default Re: New Guy, First Tractor

    RG,
    Welcome to TBN. You should be able to find pretty much everything you will need on this forum. As far as draft control is concerned I think the above answers your question. I use the draft control on mine when using the box blade and even my landscape rake. It helps keep things on a level plane. I never used a tiller, but I would think draft control would be useful. Try it!!

    You should take a few minutes to browse through the saftey section as well as all the rest of the forum as well. You will learn alot by just looking!!! Good Luck. Always wear your seat belt!!
    98 JD 1070 (573 hrs), 440 JD Loader, 8B JD Back Hoe, 5' King Kutter Rotary Cutter, 6' King Kutter Landscape Rake, 7' King Kutter Back Blade, 6' Farm Force Box Blade, Custom Design/Built Grapple, Farm Force PHD w/ 9" & 12" Augers

  8. #8
    Super Star Member RoyJackson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
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    Bethel, Vermont
    Tractor
    John Deere 4400 MFWD, Deere 855D UTV, Z920A Zero Turn Mower and assorted implements

    Default Re: New Guy, First Tractor

    Quote Originally Posted by dtd24
    RG,
    EDITED BY ROY
    Always wear your seat belt!!
    Not in this case...his 801 is a 1959 or 1960 model (post states 1959). His tractor won't have a ROPS.
    No ROPS, no seatbelt...and with no ROPS, you want to get away from the tractor if it goes over...
    Roy Jackson

    "Any government that does not trust its citizens with firearms is either a tyranny, or planning to become one."
    -Joseph P. Martino

  9. #9
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Posts
    6,553

    Default Re: New Guy, First Tractor

    Quote Originally Posted by RoyJackson
    Biggest thing for a new operator is learning safety.
    Tractors can roll fairly easily under the right conditions. You old Ford doesn't have many of the safety additions the newer machines do, such as a ROPS (Roll Over Protective Structure).

    Never...repeat, never tow anything rigged to any part of the tractor except the draw bar. Rigging anywhere else is a receipe for a deady accident.
    Maintain a distance from you PTO when in operation. I strongly suggest you have your tractor key in your pocket (meaning engine off) when working around or rigging an implement to the PTO. If your Cutter or tractor does not have an over-running clutch, get one (cutters can push the tractor even if the clutch is disengaged).


    TBN has a good Safety Forum. You'll learn a lot if you read it.

    Mornin' Roy!

    You sure must be in a "red" mood today! I got a bit scared just reading your post... Still, the points were valid - if'n a bit too red for my tastes!


    One point that was missed so far. Old tractors in general will have a tendancy to rust up the clutch. If you won't be using it for a week or two (always over the winter) dog down the clutch peddle. On my old ford I use a C clamp, but anything that gets it all the way down is good.

    The old fords were and still are good basic machines. Change the fluids everywhere. Differential, hydraulic reservour, transmission, engine and radiator. Old fluid is the root of all evil when dealing with old tractors. It can have both water and dirt/grit in it - rusting and grinding away at the rotating parts.

    Post back on you model for more detailed input.

    jb

  10. #10
    Super Star Member RoyJackson's Avatar
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    Nov 2001
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    18,635
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    Bethel, Vermont
    Tractor
    John Deere 4400 MFWD, Deere 855D UTV, Z920A Zero Turn Mower and assorted implements

    Default Re: New Guy, First Tractor

    Quote Originally Posted by john_bud
    Mornin' Roy!

    You sure must be in a "red" mood today! I got a bit scared just reading your post... Still, the points were valid - if'n a bit too red for my tastes!


    One point that was missed so far. Old tractors in general will have a tendancy to rust up the clutch. If you won't be using it for a week or two (always over the winter) dog down the clutch peddle. On my old ford I use a C clamp, but anything that gets it all the way down is good.

    The old fords were and still are good basic machines. Change the fluids everywhere. Differential, hydraulic reservour, transmission, engine and radiator. Old fluid is the root of all evil when dealing with old tractors. It can have both water and dirt/grit in it - rusting and grinding away at the rotating parts.

    Post back on you model for more detailed input.

    jb
    Yeah, I like to emphasize some things...especially when it comes to safety.

    Just be glad I haven't discovered "smiley faces" yet...
    Roy Jackson

    "Any government that does not trust its citizens with firearms is either a tyranny, or planning to become one."
    -Joseph P. Martino

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