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  1. #21
    Super Member
    Rest in Peace
    frank_f15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    6,033
    Location
    BUFFALO ,NEW YORK AREA
    Tractor
    kubota b2400- R4 tires

    Default Re: 4x4 power

    AGREE with u again bird. just use 4wd when necessary, for just mowing or doing odd jobs 2wd, no need to tear up any more ground than necessary.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    1,806
    Location
    Houston, TX.
    Tractor
    2001 TN65, 1951 8N Ford

    Default Re: 4x4 power

    I end up using FWD on pavement more than I should. On a lot of the jobs I do I have the fill dropped in the street and use the loader to move it where I want. It's easier to leave it in FWD than to shift it in and out. Time will tell if this is a bad idea or not. It lets me know if I forget to kick it out, the gears really howl when you get up to road speed.

  3. #23
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    296
    Location
    tulsa ok
    Tractor
    kubota l3010hst/ford 601 workhorse

    Default Re: 4x4 power

    You mean there is a 2wd setting for my tractor? it can't be too hard on the tractors since jeeps and lots of service vehicles have been 4x4 only since 1946. I admit to trying the 2wd mode out once but I just ended up stuck and had to shift right back to 4x4

  4. #24
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Posts
    681
    Location
    Valrico, FL
    Tractor
    No longer have :-(

    Default Re: 4x4 power

    <font color=blue>It's easier to leave it in FWD than to shift it in and out.</font color=blue>

    Not intending to stir anything up but just wanted to point out that this is one area that the Boomers have a slight advantage: the Sensi-trak feature. 4wd kicks in when wheel slippage starts, hence reducing unnecessary wear on tires and gears. Boomers have three settings: 2wd, sensi-trak, and full time 4wd. I usually end up leaving it in sensi-trak around 98% of the time.

  5. #25
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    1,134
    Location
    South Carolina
    Tractor
    Kubota B7500

    Default Re: 4x4 power

    Heck, I'm still having trouble adjusting to 4x4 trucks where you don't have to get out and manually lock the hubs![img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    Jeff

  6. #26
    Super Star Member RoyJackson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    18,351
    Location
    Bethel, Vermont
    Tractor
    John Deere 4400 MFWD, Deere 855D UTV and assorted implements

    Default Re: 4x4 power

    Heck, I'm still having trouble adjusting to 4x4 trucks where you don't have to get out and manually lock the hubs

    I know what ya mean...got one with auto-locking hubs, and a pick up with manual hubs...no wonder I can't get anywhere!

  7. #27
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    500
    Tractor
    L3410

    Default Re: 4x4 power

    Well, my kubota manual lists 2WD and 4WD at the same horsepower - no surprise there. So, it's traction. How much difference - 20-25% previously mentioned, maybe. I run in 2WD most of the time to minimize wear/tear. Heck, when the much smaller front tires are "light" (e.g. heavy brush cutter or box blade), the 4WD advantage is minimal. Also note that the front differential on most tractors does not lock, so in slippery conditions only the front tire with the greater traction is helping pull the load. 4WD drive is more helpful in compact tractors than it is for the larger, very heavy agricultural types (no FEL, just pulling tasks) - when one has a tractor that weighs over 4500 lbs, with rear duallies and a locking rear differential, the relative advantage of traction on 1 of the small front wheels is minimal.
    Yes, it sure is nice not to have to switch to 4WD at the hubs, especially during snow/sleet. Do most of you folks who normally use 2WD, when faced with a temporarily challenging traction problem, stomp on the rear differential lock-up lever (yes, after the lower traction tire stops spinning), or reach down for a yank on the 4WD knob?
    Listen, I love having 4WD drive whenever I need it, as it has saved my bacon on numerous occasions, &amp; when the rear tires are "light" (e.g., FEL load), it is sure makes driving less dicey.

  8. #28
    Super Member
    Rest in Peace
    frank_f15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    6,033
    Location
    BUFFALO ,NEW YORK AREA
    Tractor
    kubota b2400- R4 tires

    Default Re: 4x4 power

    you hit the nail right on the head!!! one of the things i had to get used to was the fel being able to lift front end up, when u do that your front drive wheels do nothing. was not used to a tractor that woud do that, but i learned! [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img] on the whole w4d is great.

  9. #29
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    211
    Location
    Prairie View, OK
    Tractor
    Yanmar 147, 1987 Model Made for USA (not a grey)

    Default Re: 4x4 power

    I thought the 5000 series deeres had a limited slip front axle? Do any of the brands have a center differential? If so full time 4wd would be fine, I would think. I don't know any that do tho.

    g

  10. #30

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    1,806
    Location
    Houston, TX.
    Tractor
    2001 TN65, 1951 8N Ford

    Default Re: 4x4 power

    They have it on the TNs, too. You have to order the power shuttle to get it.

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