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  1. #11
    Super Member
    Rest in Peace
    frank_f15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    6,033
    Location
    BUFFALO ,NEW YORK AREA
    Tractor
    kubota b2400- R4 tires

    Default Re: Pulling a disk strain on tractor?

    ROBERT: great info on the HP needed per ft of disc used. i was wondering how to gauge that, thanks.

  2. #12
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    3,731
    Location
    Grayson County, TX
    Tractor
    Kubota B2710

    Default Re: Pulling a disk strain on tractor?

    <font color=blue>Is it a trailer disc or 3pt<font color=black>

    Its a 3-point.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    433
    Location
    Canton, Texas
    Tractor
    Deere 5520 MFWD

    Default Re: Pulling a disk strain on tractor?

    Robert,

    I really think that the tractor is putting out about the 75 HP it is rated for, I am just trying to disc in what is really too high a gear, as to get as much done in the limited time I have to get it done. If I am in any of the A range gears it is fine, and if I am in B 1 or 2 the tractor never loads up, but I have lately been running in B3, B4, and even occasionally C1 and C2 on the third and fourth passes over the ground. I know that this is really pushing it, but I have to get the discing done pretty quick so that I can get the grass planted before the dry season. I think that it is also the really agressive gang angle I am using too, since I did not notice it loading up before I changed it, even in C1 and C2. Please do not try this at home, not that I am a trained professional or anything, I would just hate to see someone else ruin their disc by hitting any rocks, pipes, etc. The area I am discing at this rapid pace is very flat, smooth, and there are not any rocks to be found anywhere.

  4. #14
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    798
    Location
    East Texas
    Tractor
    Kubota L4610 HSTC, International 2400, Hesston 1280,

    Default Re: Pulling a disk strain on tractor?

    If you are still concerned, you might try what I did, for whatever it is worth.
    I was warned that running a hydraulic motor might cause my oil to overheat, so I went to walmart, bought a indoor/oudoor thermometer, duct taped the outdoor sensor to the hst filter, insulated it, &amp; mounted the display in the cab so I could watch it.
    The max I saw last year using the hydraulic motor was 140 degrees or less. Recently when just mowing the lawn with my finish mower, I saw it climb to 160 degrees, so started looking. Found the radiator &amp; oil cooler fairly dirty, even though I had cleaned it 2/3 weeks before.
    If the info I receieved is correct, it seems around 140 degrees is good, 180/200 max, then oil starts breaking down.
    Hope this helps.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    433
    Location
    Canton, Texas
    Tractor
    Deere 5520 MFWD

    Default Re: Pulling a disk strain on tractor?

    ns, this sounds like a good device, but I would caution against using absolute numbers for the safe and or unsafe operating temperatures using such a setup. I think that a setup like you are describing would be great at measuring the relative temperature on a given machine over time, but differences in the thermal transfer of the materials making up the transmission, and the relative heat levels under the tractor itself, this number might not be very useful to compare one tractor to another or to a set numerical standard. If someone else has a more educated opinion on this one, please fill in the large holes in my theory. It seems that this method just would not be very accurate in terms of what the actual temp of the fluid would be.

  6. #16
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    798
    Location
    East Texas
    Tractor
    Kubota L4610 HSTC, International 2400, Hesston 1280,

    Default Re: Pulling a disk strain on tractor?

    I do not know how accurate this is. The reason for the insulation over the thermister is hopefully to read the temperature of the filter which has the oil passing inside.
    Got the idea because this is the way many heat pumps protect their compressors from overheating, along with using the thermisters to control defrost cycles, etc. I figured if it would work for them, should work for me.
    Strickly backyard engineering, or should I say, better than nothing (hopefully).

  7. #17
    Super Member Robert_in_NY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    8,512
    Location
    Silver Creek, NY
    Tractor
    Case-IH Farmall 45A, Kubota M8540 Narrow, New Holland TN 65, Bobcat 331, Ford 1920, 1952 John Deere M, Allis Chalmers B, Bombardier Traxter XT, Massey Harris 81RC and a John Deere 3300 combine, Cub Cadet GT1554

    Default Re: Pulling a disk strain on tractor?

    That would explain it then if you are running that fast. I have found you get a better finish while going slower but I understand while you are in a rush. I do have to thank you though as I was researching your disc and found out that they make a disc I am looking for in the TW5 series and my dealer is calling them Monday to get updated prices on a 8' and 9'-6" transport with 7.5" spacing. The prices he had were from 99' and the 9.5' was $4k minus hydraulics which they make you pay extra for. Either way it is cheaper then the $7k another dealer wanted for a Taylor-Pittsburg as they are the only companies around that I have seen make a good small disc. Take care.

  8. #18
    New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
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    0

    Default Re: Pulling a disk strain on tractor?



    <font color=blue>...Taylor-Pittsburg ...</font color=blue>

    Hi Robert...

    For many years TP has been the OEM for all Massey Ferguson and a number of AGCO implements...

    Guess who recently bought TP....?

    KingKutter Corp.... [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]


  9. #19
    Super Member Robert_in_NY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    8,512
    Location
    Silver Creek, NY
    Tractor
    Case-IH Farmall 45A, Kubota M8540 Narrow, New Holland TN 65, Bobcat 331, Ford 1920, 1952 John Deere M, Allis Chalmers B, Bombardier Traxter XT, Massey Harris 81RC and a John Deere 3300 combine, Cub Cadet GT1554

    Default Re: Pulling a disk strain on tractor?

    I didn't know KK bought them but I have an old Taylor-Way 6' disc that came with our current place along with a JD M. It is a nice disc as are the new Taylor-Pittsburg's but the cost was too much for me. Monroe Tuffline has a nice disc that reminds me of the International disc's of the 70's. Same basic design and simple to work on and it is also $3k less then T-P's.

    It is funny but there are a lot of companies that specialize in a few implements and they build them for a lot of the other companies. I do not think too many tractor companies make their own implements anymore and a lot of them don't make all their tractors either.

    Do you think KK will lower the prices on the T-P's implements or did they buy them just to expand their line.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Posts
    1,390
    Location
    South Central Oklahoma
    Tractor
    Kubota Grand L4610HSTC

    Default Re: Pulling a disk strain on tractor?

    ns-in-Texas.....Neal, For what it is worth, I have done a lot of instrumentation work and if you insulated the sensor well and this means the insulation covers an area significantly larger than the sensor and the insulation didn't get significantly compressed then you are getting about as good a reading as the thermometer is capable of giving provided their are no "unusual" circumstances. Unusual circumstances include: 1. filter body exposed to a lot of cooling wind (environmental or from engine fan), 2. sensor exposed to a lot of exhaust system heat, 3. other sources of instrumentaion error (heat or cooling sources "bothering" your sensor).

    In other applications, folks have engineered ways of getting a probe (sensor) closer to the source of heat. Take a simple example: tranny fluid in an automagic transmission auto gets heated by the torque converter's hydraulic slippage and gets cooled passing through the cooling coils in the radiator. Where do you put the sensor? I prefer up stream of the first cooler (air based after market goody or the tubing in the radiator whichever comes first. Why? I want to know how hot the oil got not how well the cooler is working. Both locations would be better but I don't want to have a second crew position in my truck for "flight engineer". I prefer to place the air based heat exchanger (aftermarket) between the tranny and the radiator to shed as much heat as possible before adding heat to the radiator.

    I'm not knocking your improv but if there is a convenient way to get at some tubing or whatever as close to the heat source as possible to place the thermometer sensor, you might get a "truer" reading.

    I am of the opinion that HST models should have an OEM standard equipment hydraulic oil temp gauge.

    Patrick

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